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Library 

of the 

University of Toronto 



PLUMBtRS vamWENTION NUMBER. 



Copper, Tin, Antimony, Etc. 

LANGWELL S BABBITT 
Montreal. 



oJS 



m^ 




The Weekly Organ of the Hardware. Metal, Heating, Plumbing and Contracting Trades In Canada. 



VOL. XIII. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. JULY 6, 1901. 



NO. 27 



"TMDEM" ANTI-FRICTION METAL. 



'Tandem" Metals are better than 
any other lor their purpose, 
and are, therefore : 



The Most Economical. 
The Least Wearing. 
The Most Durable. 

Friction Preventing. 



Resistance Reducing. 
Journal Preserving. 
Power Increasing. 
Lubricant Saving. 

A QUALITY 

For Heaviest Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Heavy Pressure and High Speed, 

B QUALITY 

For Heavy Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Medium Pressure and High Speed. 

C QUALITY 

For Medium Pressure and High Speed 
or Low Pressure and Highest Speed. 

Sole Agents : 

LAMPLOUGH ft McNAUGHTON, 59 St. Sulpice Street, MONTREAL. 
THE TANDEM SMELTING SYNDICATE, LIMITED 

Tfu largest smelters of Ant i- Friction Queen Victoria St., London, E.C. 

Metals in Europe. 




POSITIVE PROOF. 



To test the respective values of brands of Galvanized 
Iron, Professor J. T. Donald, the well-known Montreal 
analyst, made several analyses of "Queen's Head," 
and one of the best competing brands, and reports 
that "Queen's Head" was not only more heavily 
coated, but that the galvanizing was much more evenly 
distributed. 

Result: It outlasts all other makes. 



JOHN LYSAOHT, Limited, Makers, 
BRISTOL. ENO. 



A. C. LESLIE * CO., MONTREAL, 
Managers Canadian Branch, 



GOOD POINTS. 

The Safford Radiator 

has a score of them, but there is one which success has accented — 
it's simplicity. Like all other great inventions, the "SAFFORD" 
is ingeniously simple. It is connected at the joints by patent 
screw nipples — that's what made the "SAFFORD" suc- 
cessful — no bolts, no packing. Just a plain screwed 
connection, but it means that the "SAFFORD" is posi- 
tively non leakable — positively durable. Of all Radiators 
the "SAFFORD" alone possesses this simple device. 

The "SAlO^D" is made in many designs and 
heights, and is always graceful in its lines and bulk. It 
is made to fit in corners, to circle pillars, and for bay 
windows. 

We will be pleased to give you any information you desire. Remember, we are the 
Largest Radiator Manufacturers under the British Flag. 

THE DOMINION RADIATOR COMPANY, Limited, TORONTO. 




RICE LEWIS <& SON 



LIMITED 



CALIPERS 


We 


SQUARES 


carry 


DIVIDERS 


a 


GAUGES 


full 


MICROMETERS 


stock 




E TOOLS 

Tools i. Supplies 



BLOCKS 

PEAVEYS 

SHOVELS 

etc. 



WRITE FOR PRICES 
NEW 

DRILLS s POLISHING HEADS 



CHAIN 
RIVETS 
BOLTS 
Etc. 



TORONTO. 



Black Sheets 

Common and Dead Flat. 



FROM STOCK OR FOR IMPORTATION. 



SAMUEL, SONS & BENJAMIN, - - LONDON AND LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND 

M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin & Co. 

General Importers and Exporters and Metal Merchants 

27 Wellington Street West, - - TORONTO, ONT. 



■ p 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE TIME TO INSURE IS 



NOW 



While you are WELL, STRONG and INSURABLE. 



THE 



V.\ 



Confederation 
Life 

ASSOCIATION issues policies on all approved plans 
of insurance, and is a prosperous and progressive 
Canadian Company. 

PROTECTION FOR YOUR FAMILY. 
PROFITABLE INVESTMENT FOR YOURSELF. 

Pamphlets and full information sent on application. 

Hon. Sir W. P. Howland, K.C.M.G., C.B., 

PRESIDENT. 

W. H. Beatty, Esq,, W. 0. Matthews, Esq., 

VICE-PRESIDENTS. 

W. C. MACDONALD, 

ACTUARY. 

HEAD OFFICE. 



J. K. MACDONALD, 

MANAGING DIRECTOR. 

TORONTO. 



HOSE... 






iag^pnSg 


| 


EHfi^HH^^HS^BiiiSF"^ 


-=- 


~ — — — — " — 


WATER 




SUCTION 


STEAM 




ACID 


AIR 




OIL 


FIRE 




SODA WATER 


BABCOCK 




HIGH-PRESSURE 


Our Patent Seamless Tube is, without doubt, 


the only 


pe 


•feet construction. 



The Canadian Rubber Co., 

CAPITAL --- $1,500,00000. 

Montreal. Toronto. Winnipeg. 



Lightning, Gem 
Blizzard . . . 



FREEZERS 





35iW 




ARE 



Well Advertised 
In Demand 
Easily Sold 
Satisfactory in Use 
Of Known Reputation 



HAVE 

Cedar Pails with Electric Welded Wire Hoops 
Cans of Heavy Tin with Drawn Steel Bottoms 
AUTOMATIC Twin Scrapers 
"The Ice Cream Freezer Book" tells all about 
these and our other Freezers, mailed free 



EXCEL IN 



Easy Running 
Quick Freezing 
Economy 
Convenience 
Practical Results 



North Bros. Mfg. Co., Phnade u'fi ia ' Pa ' 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




CUICK MIAL 

QUICK MEAL 

OUICK MEAU 

OWICK MKAU 

* S 3H- 

CUICK MEAL 
CUICK MEAU 
OUICK MEAL 
OlflCK MEAL 



it 



Quick Meal 



*> 






OUICK MEAL 



For Qasoime or Summer Stoves 2& 

Blue Flame Oil. — — 1 1 "*jL 

QUICK MEAL 
QUICK MEAL 
QUICK MEAL 
OUICK MEAL 



"Used Most-Valued Highest." 

They are popular favorites with Canadian housekeepers, because of their reliable trustworthiness, perfect 
adaptability for all kitchen needs, and simple ease of operation. 

The " Quick Meal " Wickless Stove is a marvel of perfect construction, made to please the 
popular demand, unique in its good points, an unfailing success. 

When the hot days coming, bring customers to your store, you're sure to satisfy their requirements 
from the splendid variety of sizes and styles in " Quick Meal " stoves — they are always "quick-sellers." 

The Gurney Foundry Co., Limited 

THE QURNEYJgASSEYOO., LIMITED, TORONTO, WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER 



Quick meal 




WE HAVE A COMPLETE STOCK. 

Bright Goods, Door Pulls and 
Hat and Coat Hooks. 

ALL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 




Our Mills are in full operation, and we are in 
position to handle any requirements the trade may have. 

YOUR ORDERS SOLICITED FOR 

Plain, Galvanized and Barb Wire, Wire Nails, 
Wood Screws, Copper and Brass Wire, Bright 
and Galvanized Fence Staples, Netting, Blind and 
Bed Staples, Jack Chain, Cotter Pins. 



Prices quoted on application. 

Dominion Wire Manufacturing Co. 

MONTREAL and TORONTO. 



THE MM BALDWIN"" 

DRY AIR CLEANABLE 

REFRIGERATOR. 

135 Modern Varieties. Ash, Oak and Soft-wood Finishes 

METAL, PORCELAIN, SPRUCE LININGS. 



i 
i 
I 
i 

! 

I 
I 

f 

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! 

! 

Handsome Trade Catalogue Ready. , 

! Baldwin Refrigerator Co., I 




BALDWIN 

Positive Circulation — 
Sanitary— Odorless. 
Latest Cleanable Fea- 
tures — The Strongest 
and Best System of 
Patent Removable 
Metal Air-Flues. 
Air-Tight Lever Locks 
Bali-Bearing Casters. 
Swing Base — in and 

out. 
Rubber around Doors 
and Lids, making 
them doubly air-tight. 
Handsome Designs. 
Moderate Prices. 



Built in the newest, largest and best equipped refrigerator plant in the East 
run all the year round on refrigerators exclusively ; stock goods ; special 
refrigerators and coolers in sections. 

Handsome Trade Catalogue Ready. 



BURLINGTON, VERMONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



LEWIS BROS. & CO. 



30 St. Sulpice St., 
379 St. Paul St., 



MONTREAL 



WHOLESALE HARDWARI 

A COMPLETE STOCK OF PLUMBERS' lOGiS ALWAY 




A Full Line of Taps, Reamers, etc. 



Mail orders shipped same day as received 
and billed at lowest prices. 



oe 



LEWIS BROS. & CO. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Henry Rogers, 
Sons & Co. 

Wolverhampton, England. 

Manufacturers of___^^^^ 

"Union Jack" Galvanized Sheets 

Canada and Tin Plates 

Black Sheets 

Sleigh Shoes and Tyre Steel 

Coil Chain, Hoop Iron 

Sheet and Pig Lead 

Sheet Zinc 



Quotations can be had from 

Canadian Office : 



6 St. Sacrament St., 



MONTREAL 



F. A. YORK, Manager. 




h 

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o 

h 
J 

< 

I 



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KNOX HENRY 

Heavy Hardware and Metal Broker 
Room 32, Canada Life Bldg., MONTREAL. 




Samples sent free on application. 

HORSE NAILS-" C" Brand Horse - Naila 
Canada Horse Nail Co. 

"BRASSITE" GOODS - Gunn Castor Co. 
Limited, Birmingham, Eng. 



THE MOWER 



If you keep the weeds cut so 
they* (i^ not go to seed, and cut 
your grass ^without breaking the 
small feeders of. roots, the grass 
will become thick' and weeds will 
disappear. The Clipper will do 

it. V, 



THA T W ILL KILL 
ALL THE WEEDS 
IN YOUR LAWNS. 



CANADIAN PATENT FOR SALE. 
SEND FOR CATALOGUE AND PRICES. 







Clipper Lawn Mower Co., 



NORRISTOWN. 
PA. 




This eight-foot Brake bends 22-gauge inon 
and lighter, straight and true. 

Price, $60 

Very handy header attachment, $15 extra 

if required. 

Send for circulars and testimonials to 

The Double Truss Cornice 
Brake Co. ™5Eg5i°2L 



The Latest and Best. 

H. & R. Automatic Ejecting 
Single Gun. 



Steel and Twist Barrels 
in 30 and 32-inch. 

12 Gauge. 



Model 
1900. 




Harrington & Richardson Arms Co. 

Worcester, Mass., U.S.A. 

Descriptive Catalogue on request. 




LONDON FENCE 
MACHINES 



Lead on Every Point. 



London Safety Tackle Blocks are equally efficient for 
stretching Coiled Spring Wire and for use as a Hoisting 
Block. They are Ai and rapid sellers. 

TOWNSEND (Lever) STRETCHERS 
BERNARD CUTTING PLIERS 

Only one agency for our machines in each town. Get 
our prices, terms and discounts. 

Coiled Spring and other Fence Wire at right prices to 
the trade. 



London Fence Machine Co., London, Can. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Some 
Specialties 



SHEET GLASS 

ORNAMENTAL GLASS 

PLATE GLASS 

OILS 

TURPENTINE 

VARNISHES 

JAPAN COLORS 

COLORS GROUND IN OIL 

DRY COLORS 

WHITE LEADS 

FINE BRUSHES 

CHAMOIS SKINS 

GOLD LEAF 

BRONZE POWDER 

RUBBING FELT 

METHYLATED SPIRIT 

ALABASTINE 

JELLSTONE 

BUG KILLER 

SULPH. OF COPPER 

BORAX 

GLUE 

EMERY 

STEEL WOOL 

SAND PAPER 

PLASTER PARIS 

PUTTY 
ROTTEN STONE 

BEESWAX 

PREPARED WAX 

MORTAR STAINS 

ALUM 

GUMS 

PINE TAR 

PITCH AND COAL TAR 

CHALK AND CHINA CLAY 

WHITING 

GRAPHITE 

ALKALI 

GLAZIERS' DIAMONDS 

PAINTERS' CUTLERY, ETC. 



You will find it to your advan- 
tage to consult us before purchas- 
ing elsewhere if you are in need 
of any of these lines : 




h 



WINDOW GLASS 
PURE PARIS GREEN 
BUG KILLER 
GENUINE RED LEAD 



Our House is headquarters always 
for the best . . . 

PURE PREPARED PAINTS. 



j 



SANDERSON PEARCY & CO. 



61-63-65 Adelaide St. West, 

TORONTO. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



"NOT IN THE TRUST." 



THE TORONTO SILVER PLATE CO., 






Limited 



Silversmiths and Manufacturers of 
Electro Silver Plate. 



i 




Illustration of a Sterling Silver Salver recently manufactured to order. 

Weight, 225 Ounces; Length, inclusive of Handles, 34 Inches. 

We have special facilities for manufacturing large pieces of this 
kind to advantage, which means that we are in a position to quote 
satisfactory prices. 

Factories and Salesrooms 



King Street West, 



Toronto, Canada. 



E. G. GOODERHAM, Managing Director. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ESTABLISHED I860. 



INCORPORATED 1895 



3 



1 90 1 Style 




PATENT 
APPLIED FOR 



"Empire" 
Stove Pipe 

Made in 5, 6 and 7 inches. 
Nested in Crates of 25 each. 

Simplest Stove Pipe to put together yet made — only tools 
required are a pair of hands. 

Where time is an object, we will guarantee that six of our 
"EMPIRE" STOVE PIPES can be put together in the 
same length of time as one of various other makes, and 
will stay put together. 



! 



THE THOS. DAVIDSON ^FG. CO., Limited, MONTREAL, QUE, 

Just the Weather 



The past week is the kind of weather that hustles people after Ice Cream Freezers. 
And when they are in a hurry they don't want to be bothered examining half a dozen makes. 
So they depend on their dealer's word, afterwards blaming him for a poor one or thanking 
him for a good one. 

Sell your cus omers the 

TRIPLE MOTION 
WHITE MOUNTAIN FREEZERS, 

and you are sure to win their thanks and future custom. 
Sold only in Canada by the 

THE McCLARY MANUFACTURING CO. 

London, Toronto, Montreal, Winnipeg, Vancouver, and St. John, N.B. 




Use Syracuse Babbitt Metal 



IT IS THE 
BEST MADE. 




For 
Paper and Pulp 
Mills, Saw and 
Wood Working 
Machinery, Cotton 
and Silk Mills, 
Dynamos, Marine 
Engines, and all 
kinds of 
Machinery 
Bearings. 



Wire, Triangular and Bar Solder, Pig Tin, Lead, Ingot Copper, Ingot Brass, Antimony, Aluminum, Bismuth, Zinc Spelter, 
Phosphor Tin, Phosphor Bronze, Nickle, etc., always in stock. 



Factories 



332 William St., MONTREAL, QUE. 
and SYRACUSE, N.Y. 



Syracuse Smelting Works 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



The 



Victor Mangle. 

Owing to the careful selection of all the material used, together 
with the accuracy ot JtiAtf all its parts, a pressure of 500 
lbs. can readil^M^/pbtained 

r(-^ »J*TVLE ROLLS are of special selected, well- 
seasoned Hard Maple, oil finished. 

THE TABLE is made of selected Hardwood, 
oil-finished. 

THE SPRINGS are made from Best Oast 
Steel, carefully tempered. 

Painted with durable, attractive colors. 




Manufactured by 



A. R. WOODYATT & CO., 

GUELPH, CANADA. 

SOLD ONLY THROUGH THE WHOLESALE TRADE. 




Kemp's Deluge Sprayers 



will give your 

customers 

perfect satisfaction. 

They are well made. 
They will last. 
They will do the work. 

They are supplied with galvanized or copper reservoir, accord- 
ing to the size of your customer's purse. 
We will be pleased to tell you how little they cost. 

Kemp Manufacturing Company, Toronto. 



IM 




VOL. XIII. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, JULY 6, 1901. 



NO. 27. 



• President, 

JOHN BAYNE MacLEAN, 
Montreal. 

THE MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO. 

Limited. 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which cir- 
culate in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. 
Island and Newfoundland. 

OFFIOKB 

MONTREAL 232 McQill Street, 

Telephone 1255. 

TORONTO 10 Front Street East, 

Telephone 2148, 
LONDON, ENG.- • - • tog Fleet Street, E.C.. 

W. H. Miln. 
MANCHESTER, ENG. ■ ■ - 18 St Ann Street. 

H. S. Ashburner. 
WINNIPEG .... Western Canada Block, 

J. J. Roberts. 
ST.JOHN.N.B. - - - No. 3 Market Wharf, 

I. Hunter White, 
NEW YORK. 176 E. 88th Street. 

Subscription, Canada and the United States, $2.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere ■ - ■ 12s. 

Published every Saturday. 
Cable Address {^"pV.craS.: 



•WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS 
PLEASE MENTION THAT YOU SAW 
THEIR ADVERTISEMENT IN THIS PAPER 



LOCAL MARKET DAYS. 

THE retail trade of Canada did not 
take long to recognize in the 
departmental stores, with their 
extensive newspaper and catalogue adver- 
tising, their cash system of business and 
their numerous "bargain" days, a new 
competitive force which was bound to cause 
a revolution in business, or drive dozens, if 
not hundreds, of merchants out of business. 
But, though the trade was quick to realize 
the danger, they were slow in meeting it. 
At first there was but an outcry against the 
power of the young giant, then time, 
thought, energy and influence were spent in 
endeavoring to cripple him or at least lessen 
his power by means of the excitement of 



public prejudices and by legislative enact- 
ment. 

Every trick of business, no matter how 
dishonorable, was ascribed to the depart- 
mental ; cunningly devised laws were 
prepared and introduced to compel it to 
pay special taxes because of its very size 
and strength ; and in various ways it was 
sought to prevent further encroachments on 
the fields of the '* natural distributors," the 
local retailers. 

The direct results of this agitating and 
legislating have been small, for the depart - 
mentals seem to be flourishing to-day "like 
a green bay tree " ; but the indirect results 
have been good, for the average buyer has 
received an education in the selection of 
goods, while everywhere throughout the 
country merchants have realized that the 
best way to meet the departmental is to beat 
him at his own game — to buy closely, so as 
to be able to sell at the smallest margin 
possible ; to make the store attractive, and, 
at the same time, keep the expense account 
down to the lowest possible figure ; and to 
sell so carefully that the loss from ' ' bad 
debts ' ' shall not necessitate an addition to 
the general selling price. It is safe to say 
that there is a greater proportion of close 
buyers, more attractive stores and more 
cautious sellers now than at any time in the 
history of Canadian retailing. 

Of late, retail merchants throughout the 
country have awakened to the fact that by 
uniting their energies in certain directions 
they are able to meet their big competitor 
in the open market, and buy just as cheaply, 
do business just as economically and to sell 
as cheaply and, at the same time, give better 
results to customers than can the depart- 
mental. 



Last month the Toronto Retail Grocers' 
Association united to make a purchase of 
paper bags. By buying 300,000 bags they 
secured a discount of 50 and 3 per cent., 
whereas the discount on 20,000 or less was 
but 40 and 3 per cent. Other purchases of 
a similar nature will probably be made. 

Now the proposal is made in some quar- 
ters that the old-fashioned, time-honored 
market day be revived under new century 
conditions. It is suggested that the mer- 
chants in a municipality agree to recognize 
one day each week or each fortnight as a 
special market day ; that the early part of 
the day be devoted to a short programme 
of amusement that will interest and attract 
buyers and that the afternoon and evening 
be devoted to business, or, as an alternative, 
that the day be devoted to business and the 
evening to pleasure. 

This proposition seems entirely practical. 
Many towns have already market days, 
cheese board days, live stock delivery 
days, etc. These, or such of them as are 
possible, might be combined, care being 
taken to secure the presence of buyers of 
standing for the different lines. Few towns 
have local wheat markets where the farmer 
could depend on competition securing to 
him the highest price for his product. But, 
if such a market is feasible in the large 
cities every business day the year round, it 
should be possible once every week or two 
in towns surrounded by good farming land. 
Unity on the part of merchants in any up- 
to-date town situated in the agricultural 
sections of Canada should be able to make 
a weekly or fortnightly market day a prac- 
tical and profitable business institution. 
Here is a suggestion for local boards of 
trade. 



10 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



CANADA MISSES A GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY. 

ONE of the defects of party Govern- of speech, he would have been placed at a 

ment as it is constituted to-day is great disadvantage on account of the way 

its lack of practical business in which he was sent forth. Had he been 

instinct. No matter which party is in the representative of a commercial concern 

power this defect is in evidence. In a busi- he scarcely could have gone forth in a more 

ness sense, the Government in power is penurious manner. 

repeatedly doing those things what it ought Canada is a democratic country, and we 

not to do and leaving the things undone have not 'much sympathy with fuss and 

that it should do. feathers, but a small body of men repre- 

lt is generally admitted that the Govern- sentative of the various arms of the Can- 

ment of Sir Mackenzie Bowell made a big adian militia should have accompanied him, 

mistake horn a commercial standpoint when not for the mere purpose of show, but for 

it rejected the terms upon which Newfound- the purpose of giving Canada due promiu- 

land was willing to enter Confederation. ence in the proceedings at Melbourne. It 

One of the best proofs of the mistake is was business common sense that demanded 

the "unlikelihood of anything like as favor- it; it was lack of business common sense 

able terms again being offered. Newfound- that denied it. 

land, at that time, was financially weak, ]£j g ht years ago the Dominion Government 

while now she is in a prosperous condition vo t e d a su bsidy for a steamship line 

and the richness of her natural resources between Canada and Australia. While the 

have come into greater prominence. tra( j e between the two countries has 

The present Government did a good stroke increased since 1893, yet it is still small and 

of business for Canada when it gave a disappointing, for during the last five years 

preference to British products. But it has our export trade with the Antipodes in 

made several blunders, eommercially speak- home products has been practically at a 

ing, since then. And now to its others standstill. The first steamer running 

must be added the Australian Common- between Canada and Australia arrived at 

wealth blunder, for which there can be no Vancouver on June 8. 1893. In that year 

possible excuse. the exports of Canadian products were 

The proceedings there at the opening of §350,061. Last year they were $1, (548,926. 

the first Parliament of the Australian Com- u ut w j RM1 it is remembered that the figures 

monwealth were such as were never experi- during the past four years have remained 

enced before and are never likely to be almost stationary, as will be seen from a 

experienced again for bringing the Dominion y] ance at the following table, the satisfac- 

of Canada into prominence before the people t i on t ] iafc ; s engendered from a comparison 

of the sister colony that was following in of the figures f 1893 and 1900 is somewhat 

the footsteps that Canada made thirty-four diminished : 

years ago. But the opportunity was not Ig ^ $i 413 75 1 

grasped. ,8 98 , 644So6 

When Canada was invited to participate in 1899 1,520,0115 

the auspicious ceremonies a unanimous 1900 1,6489^6 

demand went up that this country should The amount of the steamship subsidy paid 

be represented in a manner becoming to its last year was $121,666. 

importance. It was held, and properly so, T , a*. ^ ,.• c i.i 

' ' ' •> ' Lost — At the inauguration ot the 

that there was no man in the Dominion, A , ,• r> v , .1 , ,, , , 

Australian Parliament, through the lack ot 

on account ot his striking personality and , ■ , ■ , , ,, , , 

J business foresight, a golden opportunity ot 

eloquence ot speech, that was so well q'uali- . . .■ .1 , ,- e . , n 

1 attracting the attention ot the new Common- 
tied to represent this country at the ■,. , , ,, n • • , r , , X1 

J wealth toward the Dominion of Canada. No 

inaugural proceedings, as Sir Wilfrid , • .... , f ,., .1 •* ■ 

. b reward is ottered, tor, like yesterday, it is 

Laurier, tor we all had in mind his extra- 1 . 

irrecoverable, 

ordinary success 111 this respect at the mi ,, . , ,, 

T . 1 1 1 -i . 1 he Government was awake at the 

Diamond Jubilee celebration in London in lv , T , ., , , ,, 

,nn* i> , 1 • , . , , Diamond .Jubilee ; why was it asleep at the 

1897. But he ignored the wishes of the . . ,, . ., . ,.' ,, ,. . „ 

, birth ot the Australian Parliament I 
people. 

Hon. Wm. Mulock, who was sent to 

represent the Dominion, is one of the best THE PLUMBER AND SANITATION. 

Departmental administrators in the Laurier ' I MIK plumber as a factor in preserving 

Cabinet. And his administration of the the health of the community is 

Post Office Department has been attended £ gradually becoming more recognized, 

with signal success. He has been progres- In order to protect people from quackery 

sive, as the business men of this country in medicine stringent laws have been 

are aware. But he is lacking in the qual- enacted. But if it is important that those 

dies which are essential to the proper repre- who have the healing of people after they 

sentation of the Dominion of Canada at are sick should be controlled by legal 

such a function as that of launching a new enactments, it is certainly at least equally 

Commonwealth on its Parliamentary career. important that the proper legislative bodies 

Even, however, had he been a Sir Wilfrid should enact laws for the government of 

Laurier in striking personality and in gift those who, through carelessness or ignor- 



ance, have it in their power to breed dis- 
ease and create patients for the doctors. 

This fact is being recognized by the mas- 
ter plumbers of Canada, and at the annual 
conventions the importance of sanitary 
plumbing is attracting an increasing share 
of attention. But many of the master 
plumbers are in advance of the times. At 
any rate they are in advance of the views 
of the average legislator of the country. 
And the result is that while the master. 1 
plumbers, as seen through their local and 
national associations, are striving with 
might and main for the enactment of 
sanitary laws that will insure good plumb- 
ing, the necessary legislation is only doled 
out slowly and in small quantities. The 
friends of disease germs are at court, not 
in the plumber's workshop. 

Unfortunately, in the movement for better 
sanitary laws there are still a good many 
master plumbers who are not lendina as 
active co-operation to those who are cham- 
pioning the cause as the principles for 
which they are contending warrant. 

The National Association at its session 
last week decided on the organization of 
Provincial Associations and this should 
increase interest in the movement for more 
efficient sanitary laws. 



WHITE LEAD CORRODING WORKS. 

The quarterly meeting of the White Lead 
Association was held in Montreal on Friday, 
June 28. No change was made in the price 
of white lead. 

Some discussion took place upon the 
possibility of establishing a Canadian white 
lead corroding and red lead works, but it 
was found the matter was not ripe for 
action, pending the decision of the Govern- 
ment. 



He who keeps his eye on the markets is 
not usually the merchant who tries to hide 
from the eye of his creditors. 



MR. SYMONDS LEAVES FOR 
ENGLAND. 

Mr. A. H. Symonds, Toronto, who for 
several years has represented Geo. Butler & 
Co. and other English and American 
houses, sails to day from Montreal for Eng- 
land, where he intends to reside in future. 
He is accompanied by his family. 

During his residence in Canada, Mr. 
Symonds has become very popular, and it 
is with regreat that his many friends have 
learned of his departure. There is a linger- 
ing hope that some day Canada may again 
find him among her citizens. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



11 



CLASSIFIED LISTS VS. QUANTITY DISCOUNTS.^ 



HY THOS. W. FRITTS. 



OUANTITY discounts, special privi- 
leges to a special few, is the cause 
of over buying, under selling and 
demoralization of the market. It is a 
premium offered by the manufacturers' 
associations for the unsettling of prices. 
' v ue, it was not intended by them to be so, 
but once this mighty power of special favors 
is given into the hands of a favored few the 
producer ceases to control the price of his 
product. They have transferred that right 
to this favored child of fortune, and what 
he will do to them will be a plenty. He 
chuckles to himself and says : " I will use 
this special privilege not as a profit already 
made, but I will give it away. And why ? 
For the purpose of drawing trade from 
others, not in a fair business way and upon 
business principles, but having received this 
special favor I am enabled to sell my 
staples at what they cost many of my 
competitors, and by doing this I will be able 
to draw orders for shelf goods, cutlery, etc., 
that would naturally go elsewhere." 

Now we will follow this man of favors 
home and see what he does. In his private 
office at home, still pleased with what has 
been accomplished, he calls his men around 
him and explains what he has accomplished, 
and tells them "We are on the inside. We 
have been given a quantity discount on 
many lines of goods which amounts to as 
much as the profit usually made on these 
goods, and what I want you to do is to 
give this special discount away, thereby 
securing the orders of the country merchants 
for shelf goods, cutlery, &c, on which I 
shall expect a good profit." The men are 
delighted, for be it said to the credit o 
travelling men they do like to take orders. 
So out into the trade they go with the 

SHILLALAH OF DEMORALIZED PRICES 

in hand : and the way they do lay things 
out is a caution. 

The first round is successful ; orders are 
snatched from the competitors. But then a 
rallying all along the line by his competi- 
tors ; with or without profit, the less favored 
meet the cut, retake the lost ground and 
make a combined charge upon the manu- 
facturers for lower prices. This combined 
effort is of greater force than that of the 
favored few. The reduction is secured, not 
always directly, but it is secured just the 
same. 

The result: The manufacturer is damaged 
just the quantity discount. The man of 
many favors is damaged by a demoralized 
market. The fact is, all concerned have 

"Paper read at the convention of the Southern Hard- 
ware Jobbers' Association. 



been damaged. If we would follow this 
man of quantity discount favors we will find 
him back at the feet of the manufacturer 
begging for further favors and protection. 
Then, if the manufacturer would, with right- 
eous attempt, tell him " begone, you 
demoralizer of business, I have no specials 
for you," he could justly say as the Irish- 
man did when he attended a Methodist 
meeting. Before going he asked how he 
should conduct himself, and was told to sit 
down and be quiet. At the meeting services 
began and grew fast and furious. As of 
old, the exhorter pleaded for one more soul, 
as only an old-time Methodist exhorter 
could. Mr. Irishman, feeling an impulse 
to do his duty and restore order, moves 
quietly to the side of the exhorter, and, with 
a Sullivan thrust, lays him on the floor, 
saying : "Be quiet, you were the cause of 
all the trouble." And I say to you : "This 
quantity discount is the cause of all the 
trouble." 

For instance, you take the American 
Steel & Wire Company. In a spirit of fair- 
ness, they attempted as masters of the 
situation to make prices based upon quan- 
tity, and this will illustrate the whole ques- 
tion. Horse and mule shoes. 2,000 kegs, 
15 cents quantity rebate. On nails, one 
price to the wholesale buyer, another to the 
carload buyer and still another to the less 
than carload buyer. What is the result : 
The larger 2,000-keg concern does not 
intend to make the 15 cents, but gives it 
away to the buyer of any little quantity 
wanted. The same rule applies to nails 
and wire. So the favored one has defeated 
the object of his benefactor. 

THE CONCERNS THAT GAMBLE ON 
OVERBUYING 

know when they place the order that they 
intend to force the goods on the market at 
reduced prices. Then why continue the 
unsatisfactory plan ? 

It is a hard question to handle ; has 
never been satisfactorily handled, and may 
never be. But the horse swapper never 
keeps a stump sucker or a spavined horse. 
He swaps again, and I now advise a 
swapping of plans. Instead of quantity 
discount I would suggest classifying 
merchants. 

CLASSIFIED LISTS. 

I would classify all concerns employing 
one or more men for the specific purpose of 
traveling and soliciting orders, and who do 
not resort to net catalogues or net price lists, 
and who carry a stock to supply demands, 
" Wholesale No. I." I would classify net 
catalogue and price list concerns as No. 2- 



A concern that are entitled to wholesale 
prices are entitled to all there is in it. We 
have to compete with the same trade and 
conditions. Discrimination by the manu- 
facturer in favor of the strong is not right. 
Put all of a class on the same basis and let 
the best man take the business upon 
business principles. 

Why should we be at war with each 
other ? The prosperity of one is the pros- 
perity of the other. Why should I not 
rejoice to know that my competitor is mak- 
ing money ? For, so sure as he is, there is 
no reason why I am not. 

The truth is we ought to be a band of 
brothers, willing to do a brother's part to 
each other. Who among you, if in a dis- 
tant and strange city, does not instinctively 
turn his steps to a hardware store with the 
confidence of a friendly welcome and a 
God-speed- you on-your-way ? Then, why 
not in our business always remember that I 
have a fiiend and brother in this same 
business, and I will do no act that will 
damage him ? 



A BUSINESS MAN SHOULD BE 
APPOINTED; 

THE death of Senator J. Villeneuve 
removes a shrewd business man from 
our upper federal chamber. It is, 
then, to be hoped, that when the Governor - 
in Council is choosing an occupant for the 
position that he will let a business man have 
first call. 

The Senate should essentially be a body 
composed of business men, tried, tested and 
found successful, men who have stamina, 
who are of a sound and trained mind. It 
is a checking body, and who is more fit to 
be a member of it than an experienced 
business man ? Unfortunately, the number 
of such in the Senate is too small. 

And now that we have lost a man of this 
class the Government should see to it that 
his place is taken by one of the same class. 
Le Journal, of Montreal, has announced the 
following likely ones for the position : 
Thos. Brossoit, C. R. de Beauharnois, Dr. 
Lachapelle, M. R. Prefontaine, M. Wilfrid 
Mercier and L. E..Geoffrion, president of 
the Chambre de Commerce and manager of 
L. Chaput, Fils & Cie ; four lawyers, one 
doctor and one business man. It is to be 
hoped that the odds against the business 
man getting the position are not what they 
seem — 5 to 1. 

It would seem very fitting that Mr. 
Geoffrion should get the position, if he could 
be induced to accept it, for a wholesale 
grocer would then be succeeded by a whole- 
sale grocer. 



12 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



AN ILLUSTRATION OF A PERSONAL THEORY 

OF ACCOUNTS. 

BY JOSEPH HARDCASTLE, C. P. A. 



THK purchase of a commercial business 
is a common operation ; it is easier, 
more certain, and needs less knowl- 
edge than the purchase of a corporation. 

Let us suppose that an old merchant, 
whose business is in full prosperity, wishes 
to retire from commercial affairs and that 
he sells it to a young capitalist. At the 
moment of transfer the seller has disposed 
of his mercantile effects, and the buyer has 
assumed the payment of the liabilities, pay- 
ing for the equity of the old merchant, 
§16,000. The buyer purchases the good- 
will for an additional $4,000, making in all 
$20,000. 

The merchant desiring to withdraw from 
the business makes a fictitious liquidation, 
for, in spite of the transfer, the business 
continues its regular routine without inter- 
ruption. By a fictitious operation we 
mean an operation destroyed the instant 
after by an opposed operation, the merchan- 
dise is theoretically delivered to a person, 
who will give it back again immediately 
after, but between these two instants there 
will be passed an important act ; the busi- 
ness will have changed hands, and these two 
operations will have been made by different 
owners. 

Let the old merchant draw up his balance 
sheet, which, on the personalistic theory, 
we will suppose contains the following ele- 
ments, and it is in the following form : 

FINAL BALANCE SHEET OF A BUSI- 
NESS SOLD. 

ASSETS. 

Cash, amount in bank and bills received $ 4,600 

Merchandise 19,400 

Sundry debtors 21,000 

|45,0OO 
LIABILITIES. 

Capital |16,000 

Sundry creditors 26,000 

Bills payable 3,010 

$45,000 

In this balance sheet the assets and the 
liabilities, being equal, amount to $45,000 ; 
it is then easy to suppose that the old mer- 
chant sells his merchandise fictitiously, and 
that he causes to be paid by his debtors, 
banker, bills receivable, certain amounts to 
the purchaser, since he pays fictitiously his 
creditors and his bills payable ; the rest, 
his merchandise, representing his investment, 
$16,000, is sold to his successor, who takes 
it fictitiously to himself, and gives a ficti- 
tious discharge to all his employes, keeping 
only in his possession his books. 

The business is thus liquidated, all the 
debts are paid, the merchandise sold and 
taken away, the employes dismissed, there 
remains nothing, neither values active 
(assets), nor passive (liabilities), nor 
individuals — there is an entire void. But 
the business is not destroyed for all that ; 
it is indeed reduced to a oondition for 
which the purchaser pays, under the name 
of good-will, $4,000. 

What does the capitalist then buy ? 

A legal right upon the effects, exists by 
an act ; 

A name advantageously known, a trade- 
mark, a sign ; 



An acquaintance with purchasers and sell- 
ers ; 

The secrets of the business ; 

An assemblage of tried employes, etc.; 

Finally, the power of making money from 
the start. These are the advantages and 
these the lights, which do not exist, when 
one founds a business, for which the buyer 
pays $4,000, but which may be worth more 
or less. 

Some define a business : A merchant sur- 
rounded by his effects, his merchandise, his 
employes. these forming an indivisible 
whole, an entity. 

But then the buyer would buy the 
employes of his predecessors at the same 
time as the rights and merchandise. The 
unexpected consequence shows clearly that 
the point of view is inadmissible ; the busi- 
ness capable of being bought and sold is a 
value transferable, which cannot include liv- 
ing persons. Empiricism creates a being of 
two different characters, which is opposed 
to reason. If the business represents the 
proprietor, how shall the relations between 
them be established ? The capital enters 
into business at the same time as the mer- 
chant enters into his store. He cannot then 
deliver it, and to credit the capital does not 
represent any delivery ; it is an empty 
amount, being neither an asset nor a lia- 
bility, placed to bring about an equilibrium 
of the assets and liabilities. 

From the definition arise some accounts, 
which arc neither assets ( active accounts ) 
nor liabilities (passive accounts V some 
debtors who will never pay anything 
(expense account), some creditors who will 
never reclaim the amount to their credit 
( reserve account ) . 

Separate, on the other hand, the pro- 
prietor from the business, shareholders from 
their company, leave to each the proper 
function, the proprietor has the exclusive 
right of purchasing and selling and possess- 
ing the effects of the business, and these 
effects are objects to which he bears rela- 
tions, while other accounts not assets and 
liabilities merely record the condition and 
progress of the business. Under this view 
the proprietor becomes a manager, whose 
duty it is to receive and turn in the equiv- 
alent as regularly as an ordinary agent, 
and to pay out proper claims made against 
the business. With this view all the 
accounting becomes perfectly lucid, and all 
the deductions of the personal theory of 
accounts become mathematical varieties. 

The business is represented by a manager 
carrying on the business, a superior 
employe, who has not an accounting exist- 
tence, who does not possess any of the mer- 
chandise deposited in the stoteroom, but 
who disposes of it, and the proprietor 
becomes a correspondent who delivers and 
receives as others do, and " Credit Capital" 
says that the proprietor, under the pseu- 
donym of Mr. Capital, has delivered some 
values to the business ; then all these 
accounts are an incumbent in flesh and 
blood, who can be designated by this name: 
all the debtors will pay, and all the 
accounts, without exception, become per- 
sonal, for the proprietor formerly delivered 
into the business an amount called capital, 
which is still found in the assets, and has 
allowed sums called profits accumulating by 
the operations of business either to remain 
in the assets or has withdrawn them from 



the business for his own use and others of 
these profits he has allowed to remain in 
the assets under the name of reserves, for 
all of which he has taken credit. 

Certain accountants say that a business 
under a proprietor and one under a man- 
ager differ. It is certain that a proprietor 
can add to his function, those of the man- 
ager who carries on the business, but of 
how little importance the business may be, 
the distinction is forcibly realized. A pro- 
prietor cannot do everything and be always 
present. He causes many things to be doijp , 
by his principal employe, who becomes a 
sharer of his labors. If the proprietor is 
sick, travelling, detained by any cause what- 
ever, the employe takes his place and 
becomes the manager of the business, for a 
business can not remain without a director. 
But the proprietor, although absent, con- 
serves the ownership of the business, the 
right to the profits and losses, the right of 
giving orders to his manager, who is 
accountable for his acts, and the proprietor 
on his return resumes his functions which 
he had lor a time abandoned. 

In companies by shares, the separation of 
these powers is imposed ; the shareholders, 
very numerous, cannot direct all of their 
enterprises themselves. They name a man- 
ager, but in their general meetings the* 
exercise their right of ownership in con- 
firining or replacing the manager ; in 
approving or disapproving his acts, in 
impressing on the affairs a progress con- 
formable to their wishes, or in repressing 
while there is stiil time, the vagaries of the 
manager who deviates from the way laid 
out in the by-laws, articles of association, 
and the statutes. 

The entries by double entry separate 
always the business accounts, by some called 
nominal accounts ; by some fictitious 
accounts ; by some representative accounts, 
and by others economic accounts, from those 
of the proprietor, sometimes called assets 
and liabilities, active and passive accounts, 
real accounts, and specific accounts. If the 
accountant confounds them in his imagina- 
tion he does not proceed in accord with the 
science, and further, does not comprehend 
it. 

After this digression we return to the 
purchase. 

The seller has liquidated his business, the 
purchaser recomposes it on the same basis. 
The fictitious operations are annulled by the 
opposite operations, each debtor, each cred- 
itor, retakes his first position, and the new 
proprietor who has received the merchandise 
from his predecessor, . contributes it as his 
capita] in the business ; all the employes 
refine! their desks as if nothing had occur- 
red, and the accounts retake their place by 
journal entry along with the good-will. 
The good-will is a merchandise, since it was 
bought, but a merchandise impalpable, 
immaterial, and nevertheless susceptible of 
being placed in an imaginary storage. 

WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 



WIRE 



Prompt Shipmenti 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited 

HAMILTON, ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



13 



BALANCE SHEET OF NEW BUSINESS. 

ASSETS. 

Good-will | 4,000 

Cash In bank and bills receiva* le 4,600 

Merchandise 19,400 

Sundry debtors 21,000 



LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL. 



Sundry creditors . 
Bills payable 



Proprietor's capital.. 



|49,000 

$•28,000 
3,000 

f29,000 
20 000 
**■ |49,000 

The entries in the journal will be as follows : 

Sundries, debtor to capital f49,000 

Good-will I 4,000 

Cash in bank and bills receivable 4,600 

Merchandise 19,400 

Sundry debtors 21.0CO 

Capital to Sundries 29,000 

Sundry creditors. 26,000 

Bills payable 3,000 

(Showing the net capital to be fiO.'VO.) 

Each of these accounts is open in the new 
ledger, the corresponding sums are carried 
to the debits or credits, as the case mav 
l>e, and the journal and the ledger arc 
ready to receive the entries of the business 
which may be transacted by the propri- 
etor. 

The empiric school defines the capital tin 
excess of the assets over the liabilities ( the 
balance of the situation ). It attributes to 
this excess the power of distributing the 
debts and the credits, a power which it 
will not even be possible to practically con- 
fer on a man. 

Is. then, the capital a liability ? No. 
For we have seen that the assets and liabil- 
ities are proprietor's accounts, for the 
former show those values from outside of 
himself, due to him, or belonging' to him, 
whether in his possession or not. and the 
latter the obligations under which he is 
placed to others. What is it, then ? It is 
credited to him because it shows the pro- 
prietor delivered that value into the busi- 
ness, and it is entered anion" the accounts 
not only to show his contribution to the 
business, but to put the accounts in equili- 
brium. — Business, New York. 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS, COMPROMISES. 

THE LEADER MFG. CO., manufac- 
turers of bicycles, etc., Toronto, have 
assigned to Henry Bennett, Toronto, 
and a meeting of their creditors will be held 
on July io. 

G. Charette, general merchant, St. Marie 
de Blandford, Que., has assigned. 

John Parker, general merchant, Dunbar- 
ton, Ont., has assigned to D. H. Ward. 

C. J. Belanger, general merchant, Port- 
neuf (Saguenay), Que., is offering 40c. on 
the dollar. 

A meeting of the creditors of A. Wagner 
& Co., hardware dealers, Vancouver, has 
been held. 

J. M. Phillips, dealer in hardware, tin- 
ware, etc., Morris, Man., has assigned to 
F. J. C. Cox, Winnipeg. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND DISSOLVED. 

Fair & Naien, general merchants, Wat- 
son's Corners, Ont., have dissolved, each 
continuing alone. 



No Competition 

can bother you if you're selling 

The Sherwin-Williams Paint 

You can show actual superiority over any other paint 
material offered. You can show greater durability, greater 
covering capacity, greater economy, easier working quali- 
ties, greater uniformity, and greater beauty of finish. 

No paint on the market can beat you out in a single 
point. 

This fact alone is sufficient to give you a constantly 
growing paint business, and when you add to it the adver- 
tising push and methods we can give you, it is easy to see 
why S.-W.P. dealers are the leaders in their towns. 

Let us explain more fully to you. Send for the 
"B-13" booklet. 

The Sherwin-Williams Co. 

PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 

CLEVELAND. 
CHICAGO. NEWARK, BOSTON, SAN FRANCISCO. 

NEW YORK, MONTREAL, TORONTO, KANSAS CITY. 





SALES MADE AND PENDING. 

R. J. Riddell, general merchant, Hynd- 
ford, Ont., has sold out. 

Geo. P. Leitch, general merchant, Spry, 
Ont., is advertising his business for sale. 

The assets of Pierre Dauplais, sawmiller, 
St. Cyrille de Wendover, Que., have been 
sold. 

A. Cote & Fils, general merchants, St. 
Fabien, Que., have sold their stock to 
Bellevance & Frere at 62c. on the dollar. 

CHANGES. 

The St. Lawrence Wagon Co. have 
registered to do business in Montreal. 

Keeler & Constance, general merchants, 
Mount Sicker, B.C., are out of business. 

Robert Gardner, blacksmith, Valetta, 
Ont., has been succeeded by A. Graham. 

J. W. Robinson, general merchant, Os- 
pringe, Ont., has been succeeded by A. J. 
Currie. 

Wm. Laidlaw, general merchant, Dur- 
ham, Ont., has been succeeded by James 
Ireland. 

FIRES. 

A. Marchildon, sawmiller, Sturgeon Falls, 
Ont., has suffered loss by fire. 

The premises of T. F. Moore & Co., 
coal and wood dealers, Montreal, have 
been damaged by fire ; insured. 

The factories of the Montreal Car Wheel 
Co. and the Montreal Pipe and Foundry 



Co. , Limited, Montreal, have been damaged 
by fire ; insured. 

DEATHS. 

Salmon Willard, sawmiller, Dudswell 
Centre, Que., is dead. 



DON'T CUT. 



Some business men fall into the error of 
making high prices on their goods, so that 
there may be plenty of reduction when it is 
asked, says The Storekeeper. When a 
merchant becomes known as a " cutter ' ' 
the customers who are aware of his propen- 
sities in price-making will invariably ask 
for a lower figure because they know they 
will obtain it. The old method of barter, 
where every sale was preceded by long 
negotiations concerning the price, is still 
used among semi-civilized countries, but 
is sadly out of place in modern America, 
where the quick despatch of all business 
has become proverbial. A fixed price that 
allows for a working profit is a much better 
rule in all cases than is a sliding scale of 
values. The customer will not allow the 
merchant to cheapen his dollar, nor should 
the merchant allow the customer to cheapen 
his goods, it being a poor rule that doesn't 
work both ways. As for the merchant who 
permits himself to be advertised as one who 
will take less for his goods than the price at 
which they are first offered, it may not be 
out of place to remark that he mainly suc- 
ceeds in cheapening himself. 



14 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



GOOD TASTE. 

MANY people have an idea that busi- 
ness enterprise and refined taste are 
essentially opposed to each other ; 
therefore, regulate the latter to the domain 
of showman, wealthy idlers and longhaired 
artists, writes C. H. Loomis, in Advertising 
World. This is a great mistake, for good 
taste is a factor, the commercial value of 
which is inestimable. 

Good taste, should, first of all, be exer- 
cised at the store itself. Neatness, order, 
harmony, an attractive display of goods — 
all these leave favorable impressions that 
strengthen your hold upon trade. Good 
taste includes good taste on the part of your 
salespeople. 

A giddy maiden, with loud voice, and 
louder tie, airing her own distinct, if dis- 
agreeable, personality behind your counter 
will drive more people away from your 
place of business than a whole lot of good 
newspaper or circular advertising will attract. 
People take pleasure in visiting a store 
whose employes show themselves to be 
courteous. 

Good taste is also very essential in dealing 
with customers. Humor their fancies, but 
at the same time retain your own self- 
respect; the fawning sycophant's part is 
always in bad taste. Be courteous ; don't 
try to force goods upon any one ; this 
particular exhibition of bad taste is ruinous 
to your future. Neither participate in 
heated discussions yourself, nor encourage 
them in your place of business ; loud talk 
is a store nuisance. Keep gossip quiet ; 
the store which is known as a political forum 
or as a gossiping place is getting bad adver- 
tising and plenty of it. 

Good taste in the goods you carry is also 
of vital importance. The best reputation 
to have is the reputation for handling the 
best goods. Educate your customers to a 
desire for higher qualities. The recognized 
masters of department store advertising to 
day back their advertising by strictly high- 
grade goods. 

Don't let your advertising violate the 
laws of good taste. Many a man whose 
store is well and tastefully kept, whose 
clerks are uniformly polite and whose per- 
sonality is attractive, labors under the 
delusion that exaggeration is a prime 
requisite of good advertising. Boastful 
bombast and insidious reflections on com- 
petitors are out of place in any legitimate 
advertising campaign. 

Good taste is good advertising. It gives 
a business publicity of the right sort. It 
brings good taste — the trade that is worth 
striving for and brings in the golden gains. 



We get the price that we challenge for our- 
selves. The best is none too good. 



HAMILTON BOARD OF TRADE. 

The following officers were elected by 
acclamation by the Hamilton, Ont., Board 
of Trade on Tuesday : 



President — John Bruce. 

Vice-President— F. C. Fearman. 

Secretary-Treasurer — Chas. Stiff. 

Council — J. B. Fairgrieve, William Hendrie, 
James Turnbull, John Proctor, Senator A. T. 
Wood, George E. Bristol and W. D. Long. 

Board of Arbitration — J. M. Young, R. T. Steele, 
George Hope and Aid. C. K. Domville. 



that mark the difference between the best 
Single Gun and others: _ j 



DISTINGUISHING FEATURES 

Semi-Hammerless. 

Trigger Action (neither side nor top snap). 
Automatic Ejector or Non-Ejector (at option of user). 
Flush Head Locking Bolt (positive and simple). 
Absolutely safe (accidental discharge impossible). 
Metal Tipped Fore End. 

Features that are found only In the 



IVER JOHNSON 



The World's Single Gun Standard of Excellence. 




Iver Johnson's Arms & Cycle Works, 



Branches— New York- 99 Chambers St. 
Boston— 165 Washington St. 
Worcester- 364 Main St. 



FITCHBURG, Mass. 



KELSEY 



Corrugated 
Warm Air 



GENERATORS 



■(Patented) 




Note Particularly 

How Kire-Pot is formed. Long Fire Travel. 
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Better Quality of Air. 
Good Ventilation ; Cool Cellars. 
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All Rooms Warmed at all times. 



Over 1.600 Kelseys 

IN USE In Its home city, Syracuse, N.Y. 



KELSEYS are especially adapted 
to the proper and economical warming and 
ventilating of schools, churches and large 
residences. 

KELSEY printed matter tells all 
about them and gives interesting experiences 
of users. 



If you visit the Pan-American 
look up the "Kelsey" Exhibit. 



THE JAMES SMART MFG. CO., Limited, BROCKVILLE. ONT. 

EXCLUSIVE MAKERS FOR CANADA. 

When writing mention "Canadian Hardware and Metal-" 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



15 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO. 



ONLY 
WHOLESALE 



37-39 Front Street West, Toronto. 

HARVEST TOOLS 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY 




Lawn, Grass, and Cradle Scythes. 





Snaths. 



jjUZ £+ #.$- 



/^thtC* 



±-% * *~ 






Hay Forks 
Manure Forks 
Spading Forks 





Hay Forks 
Straw Forks 
Barley Forks 



May Rakes. 

Wood and Iron Bows. 



Grain Cradles. 

With and without Scythes. 




Emery Knife 
Sharpeners. 





A 



iTTiitfiiff°° li * : " 1 ' 11 ' 111 ■'■""' ll " ll " , " l ^- — 



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mery Stones. Scythe Stones 

We have a full stock of Harvest Tools. 

H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., Toronto 

Graham Wire and Cnt Nails are the Best. 

Factory: Dufferin Street, Toronto. 



OUR PRICES 

ARE RIGHT 



16 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Headquarters Plumbers' Supplies. 

ONTARIO LEAD & WIRE CO., u. M , 




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CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



17 



The Master Plumbers and Steamfitters of Canada 

The National Association Molds its Sixth Annual Convention in Toronto- An Enthusiastic 
and Harmonious Gathering— Halifax the Next Place of Meeting. 




OliONTO was for 
four days last 
week in posses- 
sion of the mas- 
ter plumbers of 
Canada. It was 
tlif occasion" of 
the sixth annual 
convention of The 
National Associa- 
tion of Master 
Plumbers and 
S t e a m f itters, 
which opened its 
first session on 
Wednesday, June 
-2t\. And while the plumbers came and 
saw and conquered, there is a general hope 
that ere long they may again grace the 
"Queen City " with their presence. 

The press of business kept several master 
plumbers away, whose faces were familiar 
at previous National Conventions, but there 
were a number of new faces present, and 
while, during- the first session, the atten- 
dance was rather slim, there was an 
improvement at subsequent ones and the 
convention was, taking it all round, the 
most successful in the history of the asso- 
ciation. 

Running through the business sessions 
and the social functions were decided evi- 
dences of harmony and enthusiasm, which 
must have made it evident to the most 
casual observer that the National Associa- 
tion has reached a stage when substantial 
development may be looked for. 

The work of the convention began on Wed- 
nesday morning when the Executive Com- 
mittee me^, to consider various matters and 
to prepare business for the regular meetings 
of the Association. The place of the con- 
vention was the large, spacious and well 
ventilated hall of the I.O.F., in the Temple 
Building, Bay street. And as the weather 
was decidedly hot, the fact that the local 
association had secured such a suitable 
place for the meetings was much appreci- 
ated. 

The convention proper opened at 3 o'clock. 
" This convention was called at 2.30 p.m.," 
remarked President W. H. Meredith as he 
ascended the dais, " and it is therefore 
time we started." 

The president's first duty was the 
appointment of a sergeant-at-arms, and he 
named Mr. George Cooper, of Toronto, for 
the position. 

The president noticing a number of mem- 
bers smoking in spite of the placards pro- 



hibiting the same, remarked that the mem- 
bers need not fear to smoke as a special 
dispensation had been secured to allow them 
to do so.' " But," said he, " be moderate 
in all things." 

Secretary Mansell — Is it a pipe-smoke 
test ? 

I' resident Meredith— 1 believe it is a cigar 
test. ( Laughter ). 

COMMITTEE ON CREDENTIALS. 

President Meredith — It is now in order to 
appoint a conmiittee on credentials, and 1 
have much pleasure in nominating Messrs. 
John McKinley, Ottawa ; Frank Powers, 
Lunenburg, N.S., and J. H. Wilson, Tor- 
onto. The delegates will now kindly coiiie 
forward and inform the secretary by whose 
authority they are here." 

During a lull in the proceedings, the' 
president said he regretted to say that the" 
convention would not be graced with the' 
presence of Mr, Joseph Wright, one of the^ 
past presidents of the association. He 
is," he explained, " away on the Contin-^f 1 ' 
He has been away six weeks and will 



George Cooper, Toronto 

Alex. Fiides, 

J.H.Wilson, 

R. Ross, 

Alex. Purdy, 

J.J. McKittridge, 

F. G. Johnston, Ottawa. 

John McKinley, 

H. A. Knox, 

H. Mahoney, Guelph, Ont. 

John H Neelands, Barrie, Ont, 

Frank Powers, Lunenburg, N.S. 

James Boxall, Lindsay, Ont. 

Adam Clark, Hamilton. 

J. Wallace, " 

A. Rogers. " 

Peter Shiells, Kincardine, Ont. 

George Ross, Brockville, Ont. 

S. King, Ingersoll, Ont. 

James Pennington, Windsor, Ont. 

W. Sievewright, Petrolia, Ont. 

James Williams, St. Thomas, Ont. 

Charles T. Bull, 



ent. 

probably be away six weeks longer. Before' 
he left he took a note of the dates and 
hours of meetings. No doubt he is think-' 
ing of you now. And if he is a praying 
man is probably praying for the success of 
this convention." (Laughter). 

After an absence of a few minutes ihdg 
Committee on Credentials returned and llr*. 
John McKinley presented the report, sIiqw*?. 
ing the following delegates to be present : 

Montreal — Thomas Moll, T. Christy, John 
Watson. 

Toronto— H. Hogarth, W. J. McGuire, J. B. 
Fitzsimons. 

Ottawa — F. G. Johnston, H. A. Knox. 

Guelph— H. Mahoney. 

Windsor — M. B. Squires. 

Barrie — John N. Neelands. 

Halifax — A . Fiddes and A. Purdy, Toronto. 

On motion of Messrs. Hogarth and Joseph 
Pennington, the report was received. 

This list was supplemented during the 
day, and among the master plumbers who 
were present at the convention during one 
or more days, were the following : 



RESOLUTION COMMITTEE. 

On motion of Messrs. Pemin^ton and 
on, it was decided ty^JniiioiAt a com- 
mittee on resolutions. In/jiur>i|nice of this 



report Messrs. 
Thomas Moll an 
ed by the pres 
resolutions. * 

A commui 
ter Plumljis ASbI 




rsifrlici 
GT I 



Hogarth, 
\i|(5/ were appoint- 
•JK committee on 

ofl* 

from The Mas- 
f Vancouver, 



Thomas Moll, 

Aid. Lam arch e, 

Capt. Joseph A. Giroux 

Thomas Christie, 

John Watson, 

H. Hogarth, 

W. Mansell, 

W. H. Meredith, 

J, B. Fitzsimons, 

K. J. Allison, 



Montreal 



Toronto 




President McKinley, Ottawa. 

B.C-, showing that the Association there 
was stronger than ever, all but one mem- 
ber being affiliated with it. 

The Executive Committee recommended 
that, in the absence of Mr. Joseph Wright, 



18 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Mr. R. Ross, Toronto, be the representa- 
tive of British Columbia. This was con- 
curred in. 

RECEPTION OF THE SUPPLY MEN. 

The President : I will now ask Mr. 
Hogarth, chairman of the Reception Com- 
mittee, to introduce the representatives of 
the supply men. 

Mr. Hogarth procured a box in which were 
kept the badges worn by the delegates and 
remarked : " 1 suppose, Mr. Chairman, I 
must bring them in in regalia." 

The President : " Yes, of course." 
( Laughter ) . 

The following gentlemen, representing the 
different supply houses, were then brought 
in and introduced by Mr. Hogarth : 

Fred. Somerville, Ontario Lead & Wire 
Company ; 

W. C. Allen, Ontario Lead & Wire Com- 
pany ; 

Alex. Fleming, Ontario Lead & Wire 
Company ; 

Chas. W. Chandler, Ontario Lead & Wire 
Company ; 

Chas. J. Brittain, James Morrison Brass 
Manufacturing Company ; 

E. A. Rogers, The James Robertson Com- 
pany ; 

W. L. Helliwell 
Company ; 

T. B. Alcock, The Gurney Foundry Com 
pany ; 

E. J. Brewer, The Gurney Foundry C 
pany ; 

Andrew Mann, -lames Robertson Com 
pany, Limited ; 

W. Taylor, Dominion Radiator Company", 
Limited. 

After welcdmiife' the representatives of the 
supply houses he called upon Mr..-.Hooarth. 
chairman of the locacfjReception Committee, ^ 
who made a few reirfSrks. speaking "^J* 
follows : >» 

"On behalf of the Reception Comfcittee of 
The Toronto Master Plumbers' Association 
we bid you a hearty welcome on your again 
meeting here in convention, and as we look 
around the room we see a number of 
familiar faces of gentlemen who were pres- 
ent at' the last convention held here, others 
again, who were with us then in full vigor 
of health have since passed away and are 
sadly missed. 

"We hope that our deliberations will be 
wise and just and result in the lifting up 
and improving of our trade relations, not 
only amongst ourselves, but with the manu- 
facturers who are so closely identified with 



transact I will not take up any more of 
your time but again wish you a pleasant 
meeting and safe return to your respective 
homes." 

President Meredith called on Mr. Frank 
Powers, of Lunenburg, N.S., for a few 
remarks. 

Mr. Powers said he was quite taken by 
surprise. " I am, however, very much 
pleased to be with you. It is the first 
time I have ever been in your city, but I 
see an occasional face among the supply 
men that gets down my way. I am well 
pleased with everything I have seen and 
with everyone I have met in your city. I 
am not able to make a speech and I think, 
therefore, you have called upon the wrong 
man. But this reminds me of a story. An 
Irishman named Pat, had given notice to 
the hotel clerk to have him called at a cer- 
tain, hour. During the night someone got 
Pat's room and blackened his face 
he slept. When Pat was called in 



The Gurney Foundry 




Vice-President Powers, Lunenburg, N.s. 



"And allow me to inform you that, believ- 
ing in the old maxim, that all work and 
no play makes Jack a dull boy, we have 
prepared a few social features in connection 
with the convention as you will see by the 
programme, and would earnestly request 
that all of you, including your good ladies 
and friends, will avail yourselves of it. And 
now. as y r ou have business of importance to 



the morning and looked in the mirror, he 
exclaimed with a tone of surprise, ' Sure, 
and 1 think you have called the wrong 
man.' ' ( Laughter ). 

President Meredith : Mr. James Wilson, of 
The Toronto Association has now something 
in saj to us. 

Mr. Wilson spoke briefly, as follows : 
" At this, the sixth annual convention of 
The National Master Plumbers' Association 
and as President of The Toronto Master 
Plumbers, it gives me much pleasure to 
welcome you, gentlemen, members of our 
association, coming from all over the 
Dominion with the object of promoting the 
interests of our association as well as that 
of the general public. It will be our duty 
and pleasure while you are with us here to 
make your stay interesting and beneficial 
as possible. 

"1 have no doubt there will be many mat- 
ters of interest brought up and discussed at 
this convention which will require your most 



serious consideration and I trust that all 
our deliberations will be brought to a com- 
pletion in such a matter as will further the 
best interests of our future welfare as an 
association. 

"I will not trespass further on your time 
but conclude with again hoping that you 
will all have a pleasant time while in our 
city." 

Mr. John Watson, Montreal, on being 
called upon by the president, declared he 
would only be too happy to make a speech 
provided he could do so, but in well chosen 
words he expressed his pleasure at being 
present at the convention and to meet with 
the members of the association, the faces of 
many of whom were quite familiar to him. 

" Now," said the president, " we would 
like to hear from some of the supply men." 

Mr. W. C. Allen, of The Ontario Lead & 
Wire Company, was the first to speak for 
the supply men. who jocularly remarked 
that sometimes it was not well to say too 
much. His line of thought was the neces- 
sity of such organizations as that of the 
Master Plumbers. He cited Windsor, Ont., 
as an example and only wished he could say 
the same thing for London. 

Mr. Chas. J. Brittain was glad the sup- 
fly men had been called in, for he thought 
it was well that if there were any griev- 
ances they should be ventilated. 

Mr. F. B. Alcock, secretary of The 
Gurney Foundry Company, Limited, 
extended a hearty welcome to the Queen 
City and stated personally he would be 
glad to do all he could to make the stay of 
the i lelegates pleasant. 

Mr. E. A. Rogers, of The James Mor- 
rison Co., also expressed words of welcome 
and invited the delegates to visit the sam- 
ple rooms of his firm. 

" J hope," said Mr. Fred. Somerville, of 
The Ontario Lead & Wire Co., " that the 
business you have got to do will be bene- 
ficial to your association and you can count 
on our hearty co-operation. 

Mr. W. Helliwell. of The Gurney Foundry 
Co., who believed he was the youngest 
representative of the supply trade present, 
declared that while he appreciated being- 
called upon for a speech, he thought Mr. 
Alcott had said all that was necessary to 
be said on behalf of his firm. 

Mr. Alex. Fleming, of The Ontario Lead 
& Wire Co., also declared that he thought 
enough had already been heard from his 
firm. 

Mr. E. J. Brewer, of The Gurney Foun- 
dry Co,, expressed his sympathy with the 
objects of The Master Plumbers' Associa- 
tion. 

President Meredith, addressing the supply 
men, said : " We are glad to see you here. 
We are not here in our interest alone ; we 
are here in your interest as well. Yes ;. and 
in your interest more than our own. If the 
master plumber gets more for his work he 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



19 



can afford to pay you better prices and to 
pay you more promptly. .( Hear. hear). 
Our interests are mutual. The mistakes 
you have made are not of the" neart : they 
are of the head. Get your heads right. 
(Laughter). I thank you. gentlemen, for 
your kind words of greeting." 

Secretary Mansell : " I can only thank 
the supply men for their friendly feeling 
towards our association. 1 do not think the 
9 relations between the supply men and the 
master plumbers have ever been as friendly 
as during the past year. ( Applause ). And 
our grievances have been few and far be- 
tween." 

Air. H. A. Knox, secretary of The Ottawa 
Association of Master Plumbers, considered 
that it was essential that the plumbers and 
supply men should meet together occasion- 
ally. 

President Meredith : " And now, we would 
like to hear Mr. Thomas Moll, of Mont 
real, address us in French." 

Mr. Moll declared that as he could not 
make a good speech even in French he would 
speak a few words in English and prove 
that how unfitted he was to make a speec 
of any kind. One thing that impress 
him was the good feeling that existed 
among the master plumbers in Toronto. H( 
was glad to see it and hoped the good worl 
would go on. 

Vice-President McKinley said it w 
sixth annual event of the kind in whi 
had participated, and he hoped the delibera 
tions of the present convention woulc 
profitable to master plumbers and s 
men alike. 

Mr. Joseph Pennington, Windsor. Out" 
vice-president for Ontario, expressed the*- 
opinion that the representatives of the ,^i» 
ply houses could do a great deal whil\ oiN 
their travels throughout the country if t 
would endeavor to. induce master plumber, 
to take greater interest hi the association 
. Mr. A. Fiddes, of Toronto, one of the 
first treasurers of The National Associa- 
tion, uttered words of welcome and hoped 
all would have a good time. 

Mr. J.* J. McKittriek, of The Toronto 
Association, estimated that there were 15(1 
plumbers in Toronto. If all these were 
members of the local association he felt there 
were many evils now existing that might 
lie remedied. He thought The National 
Association might spend some of its energy 
in that direction. The supply men and the 
master plumbers might, he thought, with 
mutual advantage, meet and consider ways 
and means of helping each other. He 
referred to the importance of sanitary 
science and held the association would be 
doing a great deal of good along that line 
by drawing up a by-law that might be a 
guide for the different municipalities 
throughout the country. " As a member 
of the local association, and as a young mem- 
ber, I am enthusiastic and am willing to do 
all 1 can to further the interests of the 
MBOciation," he concluded amid applause. 



WELCOME FROM THE CITY. 

Aldermen E. S. Cox and Loudon, of the 
Reception Committee of the Toronto City 
Council were introduced. 



Aid. Cox, on behalf of the City Council, 
extended a hearty welcome to the delegates 
and referred in sympathetic words to the 
good work that hail been done by the mas- 
ter plumbers along the lines of sanitary 
plumbing. 

Aid. Loudon, after expressing hope that 

the deliberations of the association would be 

advantageous to the plumbing trade, said 

he had much pleasure on behalf of the mayor 

and corporation, of extending the freedom 

of the city to the delegates. ( Applause ). 

President Meredith : " We thank you for 

your words of welcome and particularly for 

Mom of the city which you have 

Then addressing himself to the 

he jocularly remarked : "I may 

»u, gentlemen, we have a curfew bell 




in loronto. 
o'clock, am 
of the city 
found on 
( Laughter 1 



Secretary Knox, Ottawa. 

It is rung every night at nine 
unless you possess the freedom 
you are liable to be run in if 
the streets after that hour." 



THE OTTAWA ASSOCIATION. 

H. A. Knox, secretary of the Ottawa Asso- 
ciation, wiote. reporting the payment of a per 
capita tax for twelve members, being an 
increase of one over the previous year. "Our 
branch." said the report. " has been very 
busy during the year. The work and its 
results proved the necessity of the benefits 
of the co-operation of the individual plum- 
bers." 

GOOD WISHES FROM MR. WIGGS. 
The following telegram was read from 
Mr. W. H. Wiggs. of The Mechanics Sup- 
ply Company, Quebec : " May the delibera- 
tions of your convention now in session 
result in greater benefactions both to the 



general public and to the members of your 

honorable craft. With the kindest remem 

brances." 

REPORT OF APPRENIICESHIP COMMITTEE. 

5Tour Apprenticeship Committee beg to 
report on some of the evils regarding 
apprentices : 

We are obliged to engage boys when 
trade is good only to discharge them when 
the rush is over. In most cases, the boy, 
the employer, and the public suffer, but 
why should this be so when we have the 
remedy within ourselves, and that is by 
selecting boys of good habits and insist on 
them serving a full apprenticeship of three 
years, commencing on his first, year as an 
assistant, before entering on his apprentice 
terms. After he has so served his full 

time he would go on as an improver lor one 
year. We feel confident that the apprentice 
would be greatly benefited by such condi- 
tions, and each master plumber would feel 
proud to issue a, certificate of competence 
and honesty to such as would merit the 
same. All respectfully submitted. 

F. (J. JOHNSON. 

11. A. KNOX. 

■J. H1GMAN, 

E. B. HUTTEUWOUTH. 

LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE'S REPORT. 

Your Legislative Committee regret that 
they cannot report much progress in the 
way of actual legislation, neither the 
Dominion ;i Provincial Parliaments having 
a direct bearing on the practice ui our art, 
but the year just closed has not been alto- 
Liether barren of results. Several of our 
cities and towns have introduced new or 
revised existing plumbing laws, and the 
trend of public opinion is towards legisla- 
tion of this kind. We are of the opinion 
that as our part of the general health law. 
there should be on the statute books of 
the Dominion a law dealing with the gen- 
eral and basic principles of modern plum- 
bing, leaving to the different Provinces I 

nniiiK'ipabtus ths working out ot details m 
a manner suitable to special requirements of 
the different localiies. There is as much 
reason and necessity of a law for the pre- 
venting of contaminations of the air of our 
dwellings as there is for a law to prevent 
the adulteration and contaminations of food. 
The people take into their system a greater 
quantity of air by actual weight than by- 
food, either liquid or solid, then why should 
not our legislators, as far as in them lies, 
do what they can to insure purity ? A law- 
covering such questions as public and pri- 
vate sewerage, specifying briefly certain 
principles as to practice, and prohibiting 
the employment of certain materials, such, 
for instance, as wooden drains. Questions 
of ventilation and light, questions of the 
number of feet space of air per inmate in 
dwellings, and so on. should not be left as 
at present to the caprice of the ignorant 
or avaricious. A special committee might 
be appointed to outline the proposed 
scheme. This should be forwarded to the 
Parliament, backed by a petition, which, if 
taken in charge by the members of our 
association throughout the Dominion, will 
certainh be signed by a large number of 
influential citizens. Such a scheme and 
petition placed in the hands of so. capable 
a legislator as Dr. Roddick, who has inter- 
ested himself actively in Parliament in such 
matters, and who fully understands the 
importance of them, could not fail in the 
results productive of general good to the 
inhabitants of the Dominion, but public 
opinion must first be formed, and your com- 
mittee feel, that largely owing to the efforts 



20 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



mi our association, there has been a great 
change in public opinion in these matters 
since the formation of our association. The 
public is a Large mass to leaven, and in all 
mailers affecting long established customs 
and practice, verj conservative, but the 
influence of our association and kindred 
bodies is leavening the mass slowly but 
surely. Lei anyone connected with the 
plumbiny business look back and consider 
the methods and they will be astonished 
with the change. The whole respectfullj 

submitted. 

J. W. HARRIS. 

Chairman of the Legislative Committee. 

Montreal, dune, 1901. 

MORE SUPPLY MEN. 

The sergeaht-at-anns announced that still 
another deputation from The Wholesale Sup- 
ply Association wen' without. Soon it was 
within. It comprised Messrs. A. A. Mc- 
Michael, of The James Robertson Company, 
chairman : H. W. Anthes, of The Toronto 
Foundry Company, vice-chairman, and Adam 
Taylor, of The Dominion Radiator Com 
pain. All. of course, were compelled to 
make speeches. 

•' 1 have very much pleasure in welcom- 
ing you," said Mr. McMichael, " and I 
trust that while here you will have a good 
and profitable time. ! am glad," he added, 
in a quiet insinuating tone, " that you have 
up grievances with the supply men."' 
( Laughter |. 

Mr. Anthes expressed regret, that the 
attendance was not larger. " But." he 
added. " you are a good crowd and 1 hope 
you will have a good time." (Applause). 

Mr. Taylor expressed the hope that the 
association would become even stronger and 
more influential than ever. 

PRESIDENT MEREDITH'S REPORT. 

Another year has come and gone since we 
and the time has again arrived when you 
met in convention in the city of Montreal, 
ask of your officers an account of their 
stewardship during the intervening time. 
While we cannot claim any great thing 
accomplished we are glad to lie alVle to 
report the existence of a good feeling be- 
tween the manufacturers, jobbers and our- 
selves. There is vet great room for im- 
provement along this line ; these gentlemen 
have nol yet "rasped the idea of the aims 
and objects of our association, and we 
believe it is the vague or mistaken idea that 
they have of us that causes any friction 
that may, from time to time, exist . Let us 
bi' generous enough to grant that any 
wrongs that have been done are rather of 
the head than the heart. T venture to make 
this assertion that if we only had more 
unity amongst ourselves, more confidence in 
each other, if we more thoroughly under- 
stood our own purpose, that we would com- 
mand greater respect and greater attention 
from the manufacturers and jobbers. It 
appears to me that it would he in their 
interest as well as our own for us to have 
a good strong association. 

One of the greatest evils of our eallin? 
to-day is the over-keen desire to underbid 
each other in soliciting custom. 

We have been in the habit in the past of 
blamiii" the manufacturers and jobbers for 
our not accomplishing greater success. Let 
us chanare our view and burn the search- 
light lather upon ourselves and sec if the 



greater defects are not there. Do we not 
find to-day rather more difficulty to per- 
suade master plumbers outside our associa- 
tion to join us than to get the supply 
houses to concede to our requests ''. These 
tire problems to my mind we should try to 
solve. The man among us who can solve 
them will do more good in six months than 
we have done in that many years. I am 
not a pessimist by anj means, rather of the 
optimistic class, rather look for the silver 
lining on the other side of the clouds than 
in;.< ts on the 6un, but I do believe 

that unless this matter is overcome that the 
future of our association is not of the 
brightest. 

Just along this line let me point out one 
great need we feel, that is systematic organ- 
ization, and 1 fear the only remedy for this 
is the securing of a secretary who will 
receive such a remuneration for his services 
that he can devote his time to organizing. 
How we can best provide the funds is the 
question. I very much regret having to 
report so little done along this liile dwring 
the past year. In accepting officeyrt your 
hands last year it was my intension to 
devote my time to this branch of ourjjvqik. 
but circumstances over which 1 had 



President, and while 1 have not accom- 
plished all that I would have liked, I have 
done what I could. 

W. H. MEREDITH, 



irJvaxK, 

nd eft- 




Treasurer Lainarchc, Montreal. 



trol prevented my making a success ot it. 
Unofficially I have visited a few of our 
western towns. 
] must not weary you by too lengthj a 

report, but before I close let me bid you a 
hearty welcome to this, our sixth annual 
convention. While we look forward to these 
annual reunions with a great deal of pleas- 
ure in the anticipation of renewing old 
acquaintanceship, still, if this is all our 
meetings are for we certainly meet in vain. 
I take it that the main object of our 
assembling ourselves together in these 
annual sessions is to exchange thoughts 
and ideas along' the line of the most up- 
to-date and scientific sanitation ; to elevate 
our profession in our own minds, knowing 
that our customers will not have any higher 
opinion of us and our business than we have 
ourselves. Let us educate our members to 
rather endeavor to do first-class work at a 
fair price than to contract at such a price 
ili;il scaup work is the result. 

I trust, when this convention adjourns and 
we each assume the duties of our business 
again, we shall feel that we have been 
greatly benefited by the ideas advanced. 

1 thank you, gentlemen, for the honor you 
did me a vear ago in electing me your 



VICE-PRESIDENT McKINLEV'S REPORT. 

Vice-President John McKinlcy reported as 
follows : 

I have the honor to submit the following 
report as Vice-President of The National 
Association of Master Plumbers. 

It affords me great pleasure to meet 
with you again and I regret that I am*'' 
unable to report any great work having 
been accomplished, but I trust that in my 
humble sphere I have done some little good 
for our association. My duties have been 
very light, the reason for this being the 
great distance that separates me from the 
rest of your executive. 

J am happy to say that in out local 
association the best of feeling exists, and 
that all arc busy. 

1 regret to have to report that a great 
number of the supply houses are not liv 
up to their agreement with us and I think 
that some action should be taken at this 
convention to protect our interests. 

Another matter which 1 wish to draw 
your attention to, is the impossibility of 
getting the city councils of Ontario to 
frame pioper plumbing and sanitary by- 
laws, owing to the defective law of the 
■ e Province. J would suggest that a commit- 
\ tee be formed in each Province to see that 
i er legislation is passed to protect our 
. /-ailing, as at present anyone can engage in 
plumbing work. 

A practical plumber, one who is con- 
cerned about elevating his profession, finds 
It exceedingly difficult in cities where no 
wMBUch by-laws exist, to compete with the 
jpinillith and hardware men. He not only 
yhas this kind of competition, but he has 
also to deal with a class of people that have 
f never given the sanitary question a thought. 
A system of laws emanating from the Legis- 
latures and applying to all localities would 
obviate till such trouble and secure for the 
plumber a protection which he has not at 
uresent. Until this is accomplished the 
practical plumber with all his skill and 
ability must suffer. 

JOHN McKINLEY. 

Ottawa, June 25, 1901. 

REPORT FOR NEW BRUNSWICK AND 
NOVA SCOTIA. 



In accordance with the usual custom, I 
respectfulh submit my report, as vice-presi- 
dent for Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, 
for the year ending June 26, 1901 : 

The past vear, taken as a whole, has been 
a very prosperous one for the plumbing 
fraternity in the Maritime Provinces, and 
the trade outlook at the present time is 
very promising. 

I am happy to state that the strike of the 
Halifax journeymen plumbers, mentioned in 
my report of 1900, has been arranged to the 
satisfaction of all concerned. 

Several complaints have been made against 
the supply houses for selling to consumers, 
contrary to the regulations of our associa- 
tion, and I am sorry to say that in every 
instance, the complaints were founded upon 
facts. In view of the above I would sug- 
gest that the association take the matter 
up at the present session, and devise ways 
and means for dealing promptly with cases 
of this kind, and as a means to this end I 
would advise the forming of Provincial 
associations as recommended by ex-Presi- 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



21 



dent Smith, in whose, hands the matter was 
left for report at our last annual meeting. 

The formation of Provincial Associations 
will he di' service in three ways: — 

First— In tin- benefits which would accrue 
to The National Association by the 
increased membership ; 

Second — In the benefits to the country 
plumber himself, enabling him to become a 
member and attend the quarterly meeting's ; 
and 
.Jf Third— and securing increased sanitary 
legislation, which is needed in the country 
towns as well as in the great cities. 

Most large cities have their own local 
rides and laws which regulate all work 
done within their jurisdiction, but. when 
the citj plumber goes to the country to do 
a job he is very apt to leave this rule 
behind : thus causing loss to the customers 
and discredit to the fraternity generally. 

In the matter of organization, I have 
found some trilling jealously existing be- 
tween the city and country master plum- 
bers, and 1 am satisfied that the forming 
of Provincial Associations will help to allay 
all existing irritation, and all become inter- 
ested on one common platform. 

I submit, herewith, lor your considera- 
tion, copies of the Plumbers' Estimate 
Books, which I trust will be to your satis- 
faction. 

The Halifax Association is in a prosperous 
condition, but, unfortunately, the secreta 
Mr. .1. <;. Crump (of Crump & Perrier). 
one of tin' leading spirits, has been ill for 
some time, and most of the master plum- 
bers being busy at this time of the year, 
i he business qf the association has lagged a 
trifle. And if we have not a large delega 
lion from Nova Scotia, 1 can assure you 
that we have their best wishes and t hev 
aie with us to a man. 

On my visits to St. .John, N.B., I was 
kindlv received by the plumbing fraternity, 
and although interest in the association's 
affairs lias lagged somewhat during the past 

two years, I have great hopes of the St. 
John Association renewing its old-time vigor, 
and sending a large delegation to our next 
annual meeting. The plumbers in New 
Brunswick (outside of St. John), are 
anxious to connect themselves with us, but 
are not strong enough at any one point to 
form a local association ; hence the need of 
a Provincial Association in New Bruns- 
w ick. 

I have not been able to visit the eastern 
part of No\ii Scotia during the year, but 
have had .some correspondence with plum- 
bers in that section, and we may expect a 
local association in Sydney at an curl) 
date. 

FRANK POWERS. 

Vice-President N. 13. and N. S. 
SECRETARY'S REPORT. 

I beg herewith to present my report as 
secretary for the year ending June 27, 1901, 
and must apologize for its brevity and for 
which an explanation is necessary. 

Upon assuming the office of secretary for 
the year 1898, | did so with the determina- 
tion to do as well in that capacity as the 
former secretary, T. W. Hughes, who so 
cheerfully devoted so much of his time to 
the arduous duties 'of that year. To not 
be behind my honored friend I spared 
neither time nor energy in my endeavors, 
and at the end of that year closed up my 
book with a clear conscience, only to find 
myself selected as secretary pro-tem, until 
the newly elected President, W. Smith, of 
London, could get my successor in office 
appointed in that city in the bush. But 



I was destined to fill the position for an- 
other year as acting secretary, much against 
(In grain, and did so with a poor grace, 
but faithfully under the adverse circum- 
stances, the secretary pro-tem living in Tor- 
onto, and the president in London. 

At the Ottawa convention in 1899, P. C. 
Ogilvie, of Montreal, was elected to the 
office, which he successfully filled. 

At the termination of his year your hum- 
ble servant was extremely surprised and 
dumfounded by being elected to the office 
again. This I considered was imposing too 
much on one who had clone faithful work 
in office, and without complaint, but gen- 
tlemen, to have it rubbed in is more than 
some can stand, and the result has been 
lack of interest and a low pressure of 
energy and ambition. I am extremely 
-mix to have to embody this in my report 
and do hope you will be guarded in the 
future of spoiling the good work by expect- 
ing anyone to continue an office and per- 
form the duties of secretary from year to 
year. 

I am glad to be able to report that good 
news has been received from the Atlantic 
and Pacific Coasts, and also from the inter- 
ior, that our association locals are in such 
flourishing condition. We hear from some 




YV. Mansell, Vice-President for Ontario. 

localities that some members are delin- 
quent, but many localities speak highly of 
their thorough organizations, and the per- 
sonal benefits derived by being connected 
with our Master Plumbers' Association. 

Wherever dissatisfaction exists, the cause 
of such is traced to the small and suspi- 
cious nature, unsociability and narrow 
mindedness of some, who in their ignorance 
cannot practice the golden rule of doing to 
others as they would be done by, but con- 
tinue others at all times and expect others 
to give away to their demands. This is a 
serious point and a great hindrance to the 
success of our national and local associa- 
tions. T am also glad to report to this 
meeting the friendly feeling at present, 
existing between the master plumbers and 
the supply houses and manufacturers 
throughout the Dominion. Only one direct 
complaint has been received for the con- 
sideration of the sub-executive, and that 
from a non-member in Manitoba. This is 
gratifying to report when you consider the 
com | let it ion for trade, the ambition to ex- 
tend their connections and to increase their 
yearly business. It shows that our friends, 
the manufacturers and jobbers, are doing, 
as far as possible, their business in a man- 



ner that is satisfactory to our wishes. In 
closing this report I beg to remind the 
delegates to consider well the report of W. 
Smith, our ex- President, on the proposal for 
Provincial Associations. That, in my 

mind, is a problem to the success of our 
national association in this respect. Within 
the Province of Ontario there are scores of 
small towns -where one or two master 
plumbers are in business, lar distant from 
an\ local association, who could be induced 
to connect themselves with a Provincial 
Association at a small yearly fee, and ktiow 
thev had the united friendship and assist 
ance of their colleagues throughout the 
land. 

The following are the names and places of 
meetings of local associations of master 
plumbers : 

Halifax 21 members. 

Sydney, C.B 12 

St. John 

Fredericton 

Quebec 

Montreal 34 

Ottawa 12 " 

Kingston 

Toronto 23 

Hamilton 12 

St. Catharines 

Windsor 9 

London 

St. Thomas . 2 

Ouelph. in affiliation with 

Toronto 1 

Sarnia, in affiliation with 

Windsor 

Chatham, in affiliation with 

Windsor 

\\ limit, i 8 

Vancouver II 

Harrie. in affiliation with 

Ceneral 1 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. L. MANSELL. 

Toronto. June 27. 1901. 

REPORT FOR ONTARIO. 

In a few brief words I beg to subrilit, as 
Vice-President of Ontario, nry annual report 
respecting the affairs of The National 
Plumbers' Association in this Province 
during my term of office. Personally, I 
found it difficult and not at all practical 
to visit the various cities and towns in 
t )ntario, both those which have a branch i 
this association and those which have no 
To advance the interest of the craft I have 
written to a number of the cities and 
towns, and the replies received have not 
been very favorable, for various reasons. A 
letter from the Windsor association might 
be favorably looked upon in that it is sug- 
gested the work might be divided into dis- 
tricts of, say, four or six .cities and towns, 
would probably interest the present mem- 
bership, and they in turn may induce non- 
members to join our association, and this 
would be a smaller field for officers and 
may be more practical for them to work up 
an interest in the affairs relating td theusso 
eiation in general. The discontinuance of 
the bulletin, to my mind, was not to the 
interests of the association. Probably from 
a financial standpoint this could not be 
avoided. Would it not be possible to 
charge, say, $1 per year der member ? This 
revenue, with reasonable charges for adver- 
tising space, would, I think, make the 
bulletin a financial as well as an interest- 
ing success to the members. I would sug- 
gest to your honorable body, the co-opera- 
tion of the manufacturers and jobbers, 
through their agent's, in their travels 
throughout our country, fortified wit 1 
literature furnished bv the association, 



22 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



inviting all tion-rnembers to join the asso- 
ciation, to better the standard of plumbing 
throughout this country. Would it not I" 
a better idea to suggest a standard specifi- 
cation to be adopted by the Federal Gov- 
ernment for use throughout Canada? 

In conclusion. I may state that the asso 
ciation in Windsor is flourishing, perhaps 
not all that one expects in a financial 
standpoint, bul every member takes' an 
interest in the welfare, not onlj of Windsor, 
but of tlic National Association, and it 
would I o well if souH.' of your cities and 




J. H. Wilson, President oi tin 
Toronto Association. 



towns could show as good a record as the 
Windsor branch can. Every man in good 
standing for five years past, and every mas- 
ter plumber in the citj is a member of the 
association. I desire to thank the mem- 
bers for the honor conferred upon mo in 
selecting me as Vice-President for Ontario 
for the past term, and I remain, 

JAMES PENNINGTON. 

President Meredith: " Now-, gentlemen, 
you have heard the different reports. What 
is your pleasure in regard to them? 

On motion, the different reports were 
referred to the Committee on Resolutions. 

At the convention held in Ottawa in 1899. 
the retiring president of that year, Mr. W. 
Smith. London. Out., introduced the sub- 
ject of the formation of Provincial Associa- 
tions, hut action was deferred. At the 
Montreal convention last year, Mr. Smith 

was not present and a resolution was 

adopted again deferring the question in the 
hope that Mr. Smith would take the mat- 
tei up. At this year's convention Mr. 
Smith was again absent, but he wrote at 
some length regarding the subject and 
regretted his inability to be present. After 
the letter had been read, these were 
appointed a committee to consider the ques- 
t ion : 

F. Powers ( convener ) : Joseph Penning- 
ton, F. (1. Johnston, John Watson, W. 
.Mansell and John McKinley, with power to 
add to their number, which was hardlv 

necessary seeing they had Mr. Powers a- 
convener. 

A WISE INNOVATION. 

• President Meredith : " In order to get a 
strong convention here we have sent out 
notices to the plumbers in the various 

towns and cities throughout the Dominion. 
stating that, if they were without a loca: 



association, any member of the trade who 
presented himself at the convention and 
paid the per capita tax would have a voice 
in the proceedings:'"' 

The convention adjourned shortly after 
six o'clock. 

EVENING >ESSION. 

The attendance showed a large increase 
over the morning session, the seats on 
either side of the hall being fairly well 
filled. President Meredith was in the 
chair. 

REPORT ON RESOLUTIONS. 

The report of the Resolution Committee 
was presented by Mr. H. A. Knox an i 
induced quite a little discussion. 

The report reconunended that the ques- 
tion of appointing a permanent secretary 
be referred to a select committee. The 
report of Vice-President McKinley. recom- 
mending that certain grievances be referred 
to a select committee was concurred in. 
It also supported his recommendation re- 
garding Provincial Associations anil siimitarv 
laws. Secretary Mansell's report came in 
for warm eulogiuniv The report of the 
Vice-President of Nova Scotia was recom- 
mended for adoption, and coupled with the 
recommendation was an expression of regret 
at the illness of T. P. Cramp. It was sue, 
jested that the recommendation regarding 
Provincial Associations should be referred to 
a select committee. The report of the Com- 
mittee on Legislation was recommended for 

acceptance. The report of the Vice-Presi- 
dent for Ontario. Mr. Pennington, was also 
recommended for consideration for a select 
committee. The report of the Apprentice- 
ship Committee was referred to as follows: 

This committee is of the opinion that five years 
is the least term that an apprentice should serve 
before being recognized by the Nati >nal Associa- 
tion of Master Plumbers as a journeyman, and that 
all present and future apprentices shall have at 
their maturity a certificate of the National Associa- 
tion of Master Plumbers from their employer as a 
proof of their ability ; and that the matter of their 
wages be refeired to the local associations for 
adjustment. 

The report was received and then dis- 
cussed. The discussion largely centred 
around (lie apprenticeship question. 

THE APPRENTICESHIP QUESTION. 

Ms. floss explained that in Toronto 
before an apprentice could secure employ- 
ment with another master' he had to pre- 
sent a certificate from his former' employer. 

We have never," he said. " had any 
trouble over the matter. Five years is the 
term." 

In replj to a question from Mr. Powers. 
Mr. lioss said : " If 1 went out of busi- 
ness I would tiy to get an apprentice a 
position and would also give him a cert i 
licate showing the time he had served." 

Doubt being expressed by some of the 
members as to the number 01 years an 
apprentice should serve, it was explained by 
Mr. Knox that it was the intention of the 
committee that he should serve five years. 

Mr. J. B. Fitzsimons thought that in 
order- that the principles of the report lie 
carried out it would be necessary to have 



a uniform rate of wages. If there was not 
a uniform rate of wages, apprentices would 
naturally be inclined to seek employment in 
the shops where the best wages were paid. 

Mr. McKinlej said the trouble with Mr. 
Fitzsimons' suggestion was that it would 
not be practical to fix a rate of wages for 
apprentices that would be uniform the 
Dominion over, as the conditions in all 
towns were not the same. 

Mr. Iritzsimons : " I do not mean thatV 
uniform rate should be fixed tor the Domin- 
ion. What I meant was it should be for 
certain districts." 

Mr, McKinley : " If you want to fix the 
rate of wages leave it to the local associa- 
tions, and embody such a recommendation 
in the report." 

Secretary Mansell : "As 1 understand it. 
bv this report, a bov leaving one place and 
seeking employment in another must show 
a certificate before he can be employed. In 
our last agreement with the employes this 
matter of apprentices' wages was fixed." 

Mr. Neelands declared that it was not 
likely one master plumber would employ a 
bov who. on leaving another- shop could not 
gv i a cert ificate. 

President Meredith : " This is a large 
question and it is almost impossible to go 
into it fully. You can only take the spirit 
of it : you cannot go into the letter of it." 

The report was finally adopted. 
SANITARY LAWS. 

A member asked if it. was proposed to do 
anything in regard to sanitary laws as 
referred to in Vice-President McKinley- 
report '! 

Mr. McKinley said the question of propel 
sanitary laws was an important one. At 
present the laws were deficient. In Ottawa. 




A. Fiddes, Father of the 
Toronto Association. 



for instance, a committee had been appoint- 
ed by the city council to prepare a plum- 
bing I iv - law. This committee was com 
posed of City Engineer Gait, Architect 
llarwood and himself (McKinley). Thoj 
had taken a great deal of pains in the pre- 
paration of the by-law. But when it came 

before the council for acceptance the city 
solicitor declared it unconstitutional, hold- 



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ing that the municipality had not the power 
to issue licenses to plumbers. 

Mr. Powers said the question was one 
that required a great ileal of consideration. 
He suggested, therefore, that a committee 
consisting of three from each Province 
should be appointed to consider the ques- 
tion and try and induce their respective 
legislators to enact laws empowering muni- 
cipalities to pass the desired sanitary laws. 
He moved a motion to that effect. 

.Mr. F. G. Johnston declared that 
although it was a matter that would cost 
money an effort should be made to secure 
power from the House of Commons. 

Mr. McKinley : "I think the matter 
should be dealt with by each Province for 
the simple reason that the requirements of 
ail Provinces are not the same." 

Mr. J. Pennington: "If you are going 
to form Provincial Associations, why not 
leave the matter with them ? " 

Mr. John Watson pointed out that the 
Montreal City Council had but recently 
passed a by-law licensing plumbers, but it 
had only been able to do so after the city 
had received a charter from the Provincial 
Legislature. 

Mi-. Wilson also favored the matter being 
left to the Provincial Associations should 
they be formed. 

After some further discussion the [notion 
of Mr. Powers' was adopted. 

PERMANENT SECRETARYSHIP. 

On the question of a permanent secretary 
being- brought up. President Meredith 
declared that it was not a new thing. It 
had been talked about at every convention 
and yet nothing practical had been (lone. 
" J may say," he continued, " that it is a 
mistake to change the secretary from year 
to year, but a secretary appointed from the 
ranks of the trade cannot be expected to 
pay that attention to the office which it 
deserves. "' He thought that possibly some- 
one could be appointed, who, for a Fair 
remuneration, would give the office part of 
his time. 

Mr. •). Pennington: "Would a paid 
secretary look after the affairs of the Pro- 
vincial Associations as well as those of the 
National Association. if we appointed 
him V I think we should have a practical 
plumber occupying the position. He would 
be able to go into each town and talk 
intelligently to plumbers of the advantages 
of the association. His duty should be to 
organize." 

Mi-. Powers : "I have given the matter 
some thought, and in mv opinion, we 
should, to-night, appoint a committee to 
consider the question of a paid secretary, 
and report to-morrow as to cost, etc, I 
would, therefore, move that a committee of 
three be appointed to report not later than 
1 1 o'clock to-morrow." 

Mr. Neelahds approved of Mr. Powers' 
motion by seconding it. 

Mi. Watson ventured the opinion that the 



work of organization should lie left with 
the Provincial Associations. 

Mr. Pennington said that in the wax of 
organization more could be done by an out- 
side than by a local man. When Mr. 
Smith visited Windsor we had not the 
slightest idea cl terming an association 
declared Mr. Pennington, " but within an 
hour after his arrival we had one formed. 1 
think we should have a practical man who 
can go on the ground and talk business." 
Before taking his seat, he seconded Mr. 
Powers' motion, which was then carried. 

President Meredith : " I will name as the 
committee, Messrs. K. J. Allison, J. B. 
Fitzsimons and Mahoney." 

The convention adjourned at Id. 1(1 p.m. 
And as soon as the door was opened in 
walked Mr. A. A. McMichael, H. W. 
Anthes and other members of the supph 
trade. Mr. McMichael, amid much applause, 
ascended the chairman's dais and in a 
wittv speech reprimanded the delegates for 
sitting so late, particularly, as the suppU 
men were desirous of entertaining tlfeni. 

THURSDAY'S PROCEEDINGS. 

The convention opened on Thursday morn- 
ing short l\ before HI o'clock with President 
Meredith in the chair. Among the new 
arrivals present were: Aid. Lamarche and 
Capt. Giroux, of Montreal, and warmlv 
were they welcomed. 

" I think." remarked the president, "that 
we should have a lew words from our old 
friend, Aid. Lamarche, of Montreal." The 
applause which greeted the proposal showed 
how popular it was. 

ALD. LAMARCHE ON MONTREAL'S PLUMB- 
ING BY-LAW. 

Aid. Lamarche : " It affords me a great 
deal of pleasure to come to Toronto, and I 
am glad to have the opportunity of telling 
vou that we have been doing something in 
Montreal in the way of trying to improve 
the trade. After two years of hard work 
we have at last got a plumbing by-law, 
which 1 really consider, although J do not 
know whether it is pride for me to say so. 
a model by-law. This by-law will insure 
good plumbing and protection to the lives 
of our citizens. For instance, we have one 
clause which says that no person, firm or 
corporation shall engage in the plumbing 
work unless such person, firm or corpora- 
tion has received a qualifying certificate. 
We have in Montreal a business tax. and at 
one time it was a question whether or not 
whether we could lew a license to plumbers 
besides. There is now no danger of plum- 
bing work being done bv shoemakers if t hi' 
inspectors do their duty." I Laughter ). 

He explained that the examining board con- 
sisted of a sanitary engineer, a master 
plumber of l'2 years' experience. These 
examiners will hold office for two years and 
will be paid for their services. 

He said there was a clause which pro- 
dded that master plumbers must be prac- 
tical men. ' This does not, however," he 



explained, " mean that we want to restrain 
capitalists' from investing their money in 
firms engaged in the plumbing business. 
Such men have only to get as partners 
those who are practical plumbers. Another 
clause in the by-law makes the master 
plumber responsible for the acts of his 
agents, and it is therefore possible to take 
his license away from him should any of his 
agents violate the by-law. We endeavored to 
have embodied in the by-law a clause pra ,• 
viding that none but heavy cast-iron pipe 
should be used in drains, but did not suc- 
ceed. In Montreal we have suburbs latelv 
annexed in which there are a number of 
poor people whose houses are small. It was 
held, therefore, that the proposed clause 
would be unfair to them, those who so 
held forgetting that the object of such a 
by-law was the protection of the health of 
the poor people. The rich people have the 
means to protect themselves. Those 

opposed to the clause wanted tile drains, 
and' we compromised the matter by allow- 
ing the use of tile drains provided they 
were embedded in four inches of cement. 1 
believe this method will be as expensive as 
if cast-iron pipe was used." The proper 
ventilation of vents was also provided for 
in the by-law. 

'The Montreal delegation," continued 
Mr. Lamarche, " is not as numerous as we 
would have wished. Hut circumstances 
over which they had no contiol prevented 
many of our people from coming up. The 
dangerous illness of his son. prevented Mr. 
Sadler, our president, from being present ; 
ami press of business kept Messrs. Harris 
and Thibault away. They all desired us to 
convev to you their good will." (Ap- 
plause ). 

President Meredith : " We are more 
pleased to hear such words fall from the 
lips of Aid. Lamarche than he is even to 
utter them. We look upon him as being one 
of the fathers of our organization. 

" I have here." said the president, "a 
telegram from the Halifax Association 
announcing that they have 21 members. 
Not so bad for Halifax. What say vou ? 
And tin- applause which greeted the an- 
nouncement showed what the delegates 
t hought. 

Messrs. W. Sievevvright, Petrolia : dames 
Williams. St. Thomas, and Chas. T. Hall. 
St. Thomas, were introduced as visitors, 
and President Meredith announced that Mr. 
Sievewright wanted to affiliate with the 
plumbers in some other Western Ontario 
town in the formation of an association. 
His preference was for Samia. At a later 
stage in the meeting, Mr. Boxall. of bind 
say, ()n(., was also introduced. 

Mr. Frank Powers, on behalf of the com- 
mittee appointed to consider the question 
of Provincial Associations, submitted a - 
draft constitution, but after a few clauses 
had been read and adopted, further con- 
sideration of the matter was deferred until 
t In- following morning. 

Aid. Lamarche, at the request of Presi- 



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A full stock of Linseed 0i\ Pure Spirits of Turpentine, and Castor 
Oil always on hand. We a-e direct importers from the producers, and 
sell each of the above mentioned articles subject to a chemical analysis. 
Estimates and prices cheerfully submitted. Samples mailed upon request. 



j-Sfcfli 1 * fiffi _ 




Jarvis and 
Esplanade Sts., 



26 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



il''iit Meredith, took the chair and presided 
during the rehiairider of the morning 



A PERMANENT SECRETARY. 

Mr. K. -J. Allison, convener of the com- 
mit u-r appointed the previous evening 
regarding the appointment of a permanent 
secretary, reported they were ready to 
report. The report read as follows : 

1. That a pennanent secretary be appoint- 
ed at a salaiv ol $2.00 fcr the lust year. 

2. His duties to be to furnish the mem- 
bers of the association in good standing 
with the names of the supply men in sym- 
pathy with the association, and \ ice versa. 

15. To attend all executive meetings. 
■1. To do all work possible by correspoii- 
ill nee. tO 8a\ e e\| icn-e. 

5. To reeord all acts and transactions for 
the good of the association, and to have the 
reports printed and mailed to the members 

i if I lie association. 

We would also suggest that a COpj of the 

report of this convention be mailed to all 

master plumbers', not members of the aSSO- 

ciat ion. 

On motion of Messrs. Neelands and 
Christie, the report was received. 

Chairman Lamarche : " The report is now 
open for discussion." 

Secretary hansel I : " Having had some 
experience in the work of secretary of this 
organization, I can personally say that no 
man in business, can. at the same time, 
properly attend to the duties of the office 
without interfering with his own private 
affairs. 1 do not think we should call 
upon any man to look after our business 
when it interferes with his own. There are 
days and weeks at a time when the work of 
this association requires the whole of a 
man's time. 

"The only difficulty 1 see in the way of 
appointing a permanent secretarj is this : 
As soon as you appoint him he is separated 
in all probability from the Executive Com- 
mittee. You may, for instance, have the 
president in Ottawa and the secretary in 
Toronto. Under such conditions the presi- 
dent would almost necessarily be compelled 
(o have an assistant secretary in his own 
town." 

Mr. F. O. Johnston: " It is too much to 
ask the secretary to do the work free, but 
1 would like to see the committee look a 
little more into the matter and let us know 
where the money is coming from to meet 

the additional expense. At present, we 
have, I believe, a balance of about $321, 
but it must be borne in mind that the last 
convention held in Montreal was probably 
one of the most economical we have ever 
had. There is talk of going to Halifax next, 
year, which would mean a large increase in 
i he expendit ure." 

Mr. Malioliey : " As a member of that 

committee let me say that we did not con- 



sider where the money was to come from. 
We felt it woidd have to come from some- 
where. I would not like to see the report 
referred back for the simple reason that it, 
would prolong tin- session.-' 

Mr. II. A. Knox said that his idea was 
that with a paid secretary would come 

increased revenue. 

Mr. U. Ross suggested that the remunera- 
tion lor a paid secretary might be raised 
by making a special lew on the members. 

Aid. Lamarche ; " To my mind the 
remuneration is too low. (Hear, hear I. 
\1 \ idea of a permanent secretary is one 
that can uo out amone the plumbers with 
a view to organization. I think, however, 

we mi'dit carry out the suggestion of the 
committee for one year and in the mean- 
time we would be getting experience." 

Secretary Man sell : " I have been think- 
ing over a scheme, and it is that we may 
permit the secretary to draw on the funds 
of the association for clerical assistance. 
That could be done for the next year, and 
all the secretary would have to do would 
be to look after the correspondence." 

Mr. Knox : " The point we should keep 
before us is organization. Mr. ManseH's 
suggestion would divide the labor. The 
point we aim at is to organize." 

Mi-. A. Fiddes : " If we are eoinj in For 
organization, $200 is nothing for- the pur- 
pose." 

Secretary Mansell : " I understand there 
is a feeling among the members that some- 
thing should be allowed the vice-president 
for organization. That would overcome the 
difficult} ." 

On motion of Messrs. Johnston and Man 
sell it was imallv decided to adjourn fur- 
ther discussion on the subject till Friday 
morning. 

These telegrams were read by Secretary 

Mansell : 

Impossible to come. If committee is appointed 
for formation of the Provincial Association will 
gladly be with you at a later date. Success to all. 

W. Smith. 

London, Ont., June 27. 

Regret that it will be impossible to be present. 

Parnell & Bald. 
St. Catharines, Ont., June 27. 

The convention adjourned at 1.40 p.m. 
SIGHT-SEEING ABOUT TOWN. 

Friday afternoon was given up to sight 
seeing under the guidance of Aid. Woods, 
of Toronto, who had been deputed to repre- 
sent the City Council, whose guests the 
delegates were for the afternoon. Twenty- 
three carriages were required to convey the 
party to the different points of interest in 
the city, and although the thermometer 
registered '.17 degrees in the shade, the 
hottest dune day since 1854, everyone had 
a good as well as a hot time. 



THE BANQUET. 

Nearly 150 Guests Participate in a Highly 
Successful Affair. 

Banquets under the auspices of The 
National Association of Master Plumbers 
and Steamfitters of Canada are always 
successful, but that which was held at Mc- 
Conkoy's on Thursday evening was one of 
the best, if not the best of the six, which 
has been held in the lifetime of the organ- 
ization. It was hot. frightfully hot. in-: 
spite of the electric fans and the wide open 
windows, but nearly 151) guests were pres- 
ent, and although they perspired freely the 
inspiration of the occasion exercised such an 
inspiration over them that it was almost 
two o'clock in the morning before the last 
toast had been honored and "Cod Save 
t lie King " sung. 

Mr. ■). H. Wilson, manager of The Ritchie 
Heating and Plumbing Co.. Limited, and 
President ol' the local association, occupied 
the chair. On his right, was President 
Meredith. Aid. Woods. Aid. Lamarche and 
H. W. Anthes. and on his left. Mr. A. L. 
Kemp. M.P.. Mr. I'.dward Ourney. Mr. J. 
11. Patterson, Mr. Andrew Mann and Mr. 
Aleck Saunders. It was 9.50 o'clock when 
the discussion of the toast list began. One 
of the most important toasts was " Our 
Country and Its Manufacturing Indus 
tries.'' coupled with which were the names 
of Air. A. K. Kemp. M.P.. and Mr. Edward 
Ourncy . 

A VOICE FROM THE MANUFACTURERS. 

" I am surprised," began Mr. Kemp, " at 
the splendid organization you have in this 
day of organizations. This thing of modern 
ideas ; this thing that did not exist 10 or 
2(1 years ago. Only good can result from 
this kind of thing. For many years I have 
considered the plumber a very much abused 
citizen. I Applause and hear, hear |. I 

considered that plumbers' bills were not 
exorbitant. I Applause, and a voice : ' I 
would like to do work for you.' ) Some 
years ago, on receiving a bill from a plum- 
ber 1 would carefully look over the one item 
and if the profit was 1(111 per cent. 1 did 
not even then think it exorbitant. 
( Laughter ). But I used to wish 1 could 
make a profit like that. ( Renewed laugh- 
ter ). 1 came to the conclusion that the 
plumber should, in making out his bills, 
do as the doctor docs, merely say, ' to pro 
fessional services.' so much. ( Laughter I. 

• The plumber is doing a great service 
to the community. As I understand it. 
\ou are striving for better sanitary laws. 
You are not satisfied with the present laws. 
which are in some instances of a verj erode 
character. I am sure, therefore, you should 
lie proud of your association and its aims." 
( Hear. hear ). 

Speaking of Canada, he said in part : 
" We have one of the greatest countries in 
the world. We have an intelligent and 
progressive people, and we have almost 
everything in this country that we require. 
The opinion is often expressed that we are 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



27 




THE NATIONAL CONVENTION OF MASTER PLUMBERS. 
A Group of Plumbers, Supply Men and Ladies. 



keeping more of our people in this country 
than we ever did before. Thia is because of 
our manufacturing industries. And we hope 
that those manufacturing industries will so 
develop in the future that we shall be able 
to continue this policy." 

Loud and long applause greeted Mr. Kemp 
as he took his seal . 

THE DEVELOPMENT OF MANUFACTURING. 

Mr. Gumey, who was greeted with "He's 
a jollj good fellow," when he arose to 
speak, began with a little pleasantry at 
Air. Kemp's expense, whom he considered 
magnanimous in paying his plumbers' bill 
when he knew they were earning profits of 
400 per cent. The warmth of the atmos- 
phere, he declared, must have been largely 
due to the warmth of the reception given 
to the out-of-town delegates. 

Touching upon the aims and objects of the 
association, he said it seemed necessarj 
under the modern system of competition to 
bring on some ameliorating conditions. 

Speaking of the manufacturers, he said : 
"One ol' the daily papers used to call us 
rObber barons. (Laughter). This was a 
new order of nobility. I am glad to say 
that the Canadian manufacturer has come 
to stay. When my grandfather came to 
this country they had to manufacture goods 
from start to finish. The goods they 



manufactured they had to turn into maple 
sugar and fish, which they would bring 
into Hamilton and turn over to the grocers, 
while their workmen would be paid with 
orders on the grocer. It was a great sys- 
tem of barter. The manufacturer has now 
a reasonable amount of protection. And 
you have in Canada a great banking sys- 
tem. You have social conditions better 
than any in the world : you have in Can- 
ada a country where law is observed and 
where one man stands before the law, no 
matter how wealthy he may be, just the 
same as any other man. We have to-day, 
in Canada, a degree of freedom of trade 
which can only exist where the individual 
trader can maintain himseh against Uiosc 
consolidations which are taking mace ii the 
United States and in other countries." 

Me expressed his approval of i he aims 
and objects of the association, and added : 
" I would say to the young men hue: if 
this association does not make you better 
fellows, then you had better get into tome 
other association." (Applause). 

In a witty speech, Mr. H. W. Anthes pro- 
posed the next toast. " Our guests of The 
National Association." 

THE ASSOCIATIONS DEVELOPMENT. 

President Meredith, of The National 
Association, was the first to respond. He 
said that what seemed to be a mountain of 



obstacles five years ago, when the National 
Association was formed in Montreal, had 
turned out to be only a ' bluff.' I Hear. 
hear). " And by,-and-bye our association 
will be on Pisgah's Height," he added, 
amid applause. This National Association 
has grown so large that to-day we have 
been discussing the question of forming 
Provincial Associations. We shall have six 
Provincial Associations, and we trust that 
before another year has passed over our 
heads this will be an accomplished fact. 
( Applause ). To-day we are stronger than 
ever before. And we believe that the 

stronger we are and the more we organize; 
the better it will be for the master plumb- 
er and for the manufacturer of supplies. 
Mr. Kemp, in his address, placed us next 
to the dot-tors. I would place the plumb- 
er before the doctor, for we keep the peo- 
ple well while the doctor keeps the people 
sick as long as you have money in your 
pocket." ( Laughter ). 

Aid. Lamarche was greeted with " He's a 
Daisy." when he arose to speak. After 
thanking those present for the heart} man 
ner in which they had drunk the toast, he 
said that when the National Association 
was formed in Montreal six years ago they 
never thought it would have attracted so 
much attention as it now does. " We 

wanted simply," he continued, " to ask the 



28 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



manufacturers to do unto us as they would 
that we should do unto them. Thej were 
wit 1 1 us in Montreal ; they are with us 
in Toronto. What we want in our associa- 
tion is sinipb to live and let live. We 
want to see that good work is done. We 
do not want, as our chairman has said, the 
doctor to get all the money. (Laughter). 
Ihe best thing we can do is to prevent 
disease b.\ having good plumbing laws 
enacted." (Hear, hear). He explained 
that the object sought in forming' Provin- 
cial Associations was the promotion of this 
good work. 

He spoke of the absence of racial feeling 
in the association. " i have," he said, 
" the honor of being of French descent, but 
1 had also the honor of being the first 
president of the National Association. 
I Applause I. So long as we in this coun- 
try work hand in hand the better it will 
be tor us. He have here with us to-night, 
(apt. Giroux, than whom there is no bel 
ter Canadian. He has fought for his 

Country. Onlj one nationality should 

exist in this country. i believe that the 
English mother is as good as the French 
mother and the French as good as the 
tinglish. The Canadian mother cannot I" 
surpassed by any mother in the world. 
( Loud applause J. 

Before taking his scat, he said that 
although that da\ was his 17th birthday 
and his family would have preferred to have 
him at home, yet he felt it was his duty 
to attend the convention. (Loud ap- 

plause ). 

Mayor Howland just then entered the hall 
and was warmly received. 

Telegrams of regret were read from 
Henry Dunbrack, of St. John ; VV. Smith, 
of London ; .) . H. Doody and 1'. Me 
Michael, of St. Colin, N.B. 

Mr. Frank Powers, of Lunenburg, N.S., 
also replied to the toast. " Our Guests," 
and he was warmlj applauded on rising to 
his tret. " I feel verj highLj honored," 
he said, " in being called upon to reply to 
this toast, but as i ho evening has advanced 
and as other speakers ate to follow, 1 shall 
speak but verj briefly. 1 wish to thank 
\ou on behalf of the Nova Scotia Associa- 
tion for the warm waj in which you have 
received mo. i am much pleased with 
your beautiful city. I hope to come here 
again and I think you will do well !>\ try- 
in- to bring up moil- people from the 
Lower Provinces. I wish to differ with 
Aid. Lamarche as to Montreal being the 
best place in which to hold tic next meet 
ing. I ask you to come down to God's 
own country — Nova Scotia. We cannot 
show you as beautiful a city as Toronto, 
lint we can show you the salt water, the 
ships of the British navy, and we will 
i n a1 you we'll. I Applause I. 

Mr. Patterson, of The Toronto Foundiw 
Co., proposed the toast : " The Mayor and 
( 'oipo ration." 



A STIRRING INCIDENT. 

His Worship was happy in his remarks. 
Alter a few Iiit md u< t or\ remarks, he spoke 
in French, the following of which is a 
translation: " We speak in French as we 
are always pleased to meet people from the 
Province of Quebec, and whenever we have 
an opportunity of meeting them we receive 
them as Canadians, as all classes should be 
received all over Canada." After the loud 
and long applause had subsided. His Wor- 
ship added in English: " 1 must apolo- 
gize for the polyglot way in which 1 spoke. 
But it would be a good thing for us to 
-peak the two languages of the two peo- 
ples that inhabit this country. " 

in the midst of the loud applause which 
greeted this remark. Aid. Lamarche, of 
Montreal, jumped to his feet. 

Mr. Chairman," he said. " I must 
apologize for interrupting, but it would 
give us French-Canadians a great deal of 
pleasure to give three cheers for the Mayor 
of Toronto. It is the first tune that a 
Mayor of the city of Toronto has addressed 
a public meeting in French. It shows that 
a much better EeeKng is growing up between 
the two people and I am sure 1 onl\ express 
(he toolings of tin- people of the Province 
of Quel ^r when we say. that we wish to 
have tin opportunity "of having some gentle- 
man in a position similar to his to return 
(he compliment." 

Then, not only the French-Canadians, but 
every guest in the room joined in loud- and 
long applause. 

\ld. Woods declared that the citj of 
Toronto was proud of its master plumbers 
ami was proud of its plumbing by-law, 
which was largelj the work of the master 
plumbers. 

HONORS FOR MR. A. FIDDES. 

After the last speaker had taken his seat 
there was a brief and mysterious consulta- 
tion between Chairman Wilson and a few of 
his confreres, which was followed b\ Mr. 
Wilson remarking: ''.lust at this point 
we have an important matter to perform, 
and I will call upon Mr. Meredith to per- 
form it." 

Mr. Meredith : " As I cannot perform it 
alone I must ask Messrs. Fiddes and Purdj 
to come forward." 

When I hose "-c nl lemen had complied, Mr. 
Meredith added : " Aid. Lamarche is (he 
father of The National Association but our 
friend Mr. Fiddes is the father of the Tor- 
onto Association, and was wiping .i::nts 
when the most of us here were in em 1 rvo 
When our funds were low and our accounts 
pressing we would appeal to " Papa," and 
they would be paid. (Laughter). On 
behalf of The Master Plumbers' Association. 
I render unto this gentleman the dues that 
are his. and we have selected this ring' 
because it is a circle and because, as you 
know, a circle has no ending. I once 
thought (hat the grey hairs that crown t lie 
head of Mr. Fiddes were due to age, but I 
Learned to-day that they were due to the 



fact that Mr. Alex. Purely was once his 
hel| or— ( laughter ) — and took so long to go 
to the shop for tools, as to cause our old 
friend's hair to turn grey. ( Renewed 
laughter'). 1 have now much pleasure in 
asking Mr. Purdy to present this ring to 
.Mr. Fiddes." 

Mr. Purdy : " Before I put this ring on 
Mr. Fiddes' finger allow me to say that he 
is the first man for whom I carried tools, 
and 1 thank tin- members of the association y 
for giving me the honor of placing this ring 
on iiis finuer." 

As the ring, a broad gold band with 
Masonic emblem and diamond setting, was 
placed on the recipient's finger, cheers and 
counter cheers, long and loud, went tip from 
the assembled guests, and after these had 
subsided, deeply touched foj the war.m 
appreciation of his friends. Mr. Fiddes 
thanked them in fitting terms for the wax 
in which they had honored him. 

The toast list was again taken up. by 
Mr. -J. B. Fitzsimons proposing the " Manu- 
facturers and Supply Men." The gentle- 
men who replied to the toast were Mes'srs. 
J. H. Patterson, of The Toronto Foundry 
Co.; Adam Taylor, of The Dominion Radiator 
Co.; II. W. Anthes, of The Toronto Foun- 
dry Co. : Alex. Saunders, "of The Goderieh 
Organ Co. ; Alex. Fleming, of The Ontario 
l..ad & Wire Co. | T. B. Alcock. of The 

Gurriey Foundry Co., Limited : Chas. Mor- 
rison, of The .lames Morrison Co. ; 

Stevens, of 'The Stevens' Manufacturing 
Co. ; Andrew Mann, of The James Robert- 
son Co., Limited. 

"Sister Associations," proposed by Mr. 
W. Mansell, brought speeches from Mi'. 
(bant Helliweil, President of the Ontario 
Soeiet.v of Architects, and Mr. Robert Har- 
rison. President of The Journeyman 
Plumbers' Association. 

" Local Master Plumbers Association," 
proposed by Mr. Frank Powers, of Lunen- 




A Supply Man's Easy Position. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



29 



burg, N.S.. was responded to by Messrs. 
J. J. McKittriok, of The Toronto Furnace 
(',.. ; J, II. Wilson, President of The Tor- 
onto Master Plumbers' Association, and K. 
J. Allison, Secretary of The Toronto Mas- 
ter Plumbers' Association. 

"The Ladies," brought ('apt. Giroux, of 
Montreal, to his feet. 

The toast list was liberally interspersed 
with songs, the quality of which may lie 
gathered from the fact that those who con- 
tributed were Messrs. Bert. Barvey, James 
Fax, Wainwright, Fulton, and J. Fiddes, 
F- — 

FRIDAY'S SESSION. 

The morning session was called for 9. 3(1 
o'clock, but it was after It) before the 
thread of business was taken up. 

" 1 was in the chair at 9.40," remarked 
President Meredith as he called the met 
ing to order, " but as the delegates were 
not present 1 had to vacate it again." 

After routine, the first order (if bu<ines- 
was the appointment of auditors, and these 
gentlemen were named by the president 
and accepted by the meeting! Messrs. R. 
[loss, II. Malone and H. A. Knox. 

These were appointed a Nominating Com- 
mittee; Messrs. John Watson, Montreal ; 
Frank Powers, Lunenburg, N.S. ; and J. (j. 
.Johnston, Ottawa. 

THE NEXT PLACE OF MEETING. 

Presidenl Meredith : " T think the next 
biiMinss tu discuss in the place of meeting 
fur 1902. It, may have some influence on 
the Nominating Committee.'' 

Mr. Watson: " You appointed a special 
committee to consider the probable cost of 
meeting in Halifax. The committee is now- 
able to report." 

President .Meredith : " Is it your pleasure 
that the committee now report? Just before 
the committee reports J ma\ state that 
Halifax has got one of the strongest asso- 
ciations in the Dominion. Thej have urged 
us foi- three years to come down there with 
oin convention. They believe it would put 
a ^n;it deal of life into both the National 
.Association and the plumbers of the Mail 
time Provinces. At the last session in 
Montreal, had the Nova Scotia representa- 
tives pushed their claims we would now be 
down by the salt water sniffing the sea 
breezes. Bui they did not press their 
claim on conditions that a special commit- 
tee was appointed to consider the matter 
and report at this year's convention." 

Mr. John Watson presented the Following 
report : 

The cost of holding the next convention in Hali- 
fax, your committee estimate as follows : 
Railroad fare, including meals and sleeper 

for 7 officers #315 

Printing and reporting proceedings. 125 

Total $440 

Your committee, however, are of opinion that 
we shall be able to get lower railway fares than 
those upon which we now base the cost. 

John Watson, 
J. Pennington, 
Frank Powers. 

Mr. Frank Towers said he was positive 
lower rates could be obtained provided the 



E. W. B. Snider, Pres. W. W. Snider, Vice-Pres. 

H. W. Anthes, Manager. Secy, and Treas. 

Toronto Foundry Co. 

^ LIMITED. 

i^ flanufacturers of J 

i Soil Pipe and Fittings '£ 
-i Sinks and Boiler Stands ■► 

■41 & 

0\ *^ *j» ♦> »> *jk ♦> •?*ij k *** *** *»* *» % *»* •#* *»* •$* *s* *i* *i* *j fe •** #t 



Telephone 5335. 



T ORONTO. 




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Manufacturer oi 

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PRESTON, 



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Canada. 



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Ask your Wholesale House for 
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Write for Prices. 



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NEW BRITAIN, CONN., U.S.A. 



IMPROVED CARPENTERS' 
TOOLS 



SOLD BY AL L HARDWARE 
DEALEPS. 



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I If you want the hest cheap rifle ever made we have it in the Stevens-Maynard Jr. It k 
will he a great seller this year. Better place order now. 

■ The leading Jobbers handle Stevens products. 



f J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co., p °i,? ox Chicopee Falls, Mass., U.S.A. k 



30 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



National Association was properly brought 
to the attention of the railway authorities. 

President Meredith : " What the Execu- 
tive Committee has done is to find out the 
cost over the I. (J. R.. from Montreal to 
Halifax. If there are ten or more dele- 
gates attending the convention we are 
charged single fare to Halifax, but knowing 
that we will lie anxious to gel back to a 
more congenial spot they will take us back 
to .Montreal for nothing. (Laughter). 'The 

lair i i Montreal to points in Ontario 

will I ne third of the regular fare." 

The report was received. 

' Now," said Mr. Powers, who last \ ea i 
moved a similar resolution. " i would move 
that the next plaee of meeting lie Halifax. 
1 guarantee to treat you well and to keep 
xnii cool while you are there. 

Secretary Mansell ( jocularly ) : " 1 would 
move that the next plaee of meeting be 
Toronto. 1 do not want to go down to 

Halifax to keep COol. 1 want to stay heir 
and have a hot old time." 

Mr. Powers : " We will give you a hot 
old time." 

Mr. Mansell : " Oh. that makes it differ 
ent. Why diil you not say sii before? 

After some further pleasantries, it was. 
by a unanimous vote, final 1 \ decided to 
bold next year's convention in Halifax, and 
the cheering- which followed was led by 
Secretary Mansell. 

PROVINCIAL ASSOCIATIONS. 

Wl.cn President Meredith announced that 
the next order of business would he the 
consideration of the question of the forma- 
tion of Provincial Associations, he said that 

some of the delegates seemed to lie under 

the impression that they were amending 
the constitution of The National Associa- 
tion. "This." he continued. " we air 
not doing. We are simply making a con 
st it ut ion for the proposed Provincial Asso- 
ciations. We an' not changing the consti- 
tution of The National Association one iota. 
The constitution oi The National Associa- 
tion cannot lie changed at this meeting. It 
would require a notice of motion for next 
year's meeting." 

After some discussion the constitution as 
reported by the special committee was 
adopted with the proviso that the chair- 
man of the special committee, after altering 
such portions of the constitution as had 
been taken from the constitution of The 
National Association ill order to make it 
applicable to the Provincial organizations, 
should submit the same to the new Execu- 
tive Committee for endorsation. With a 

few possible clerical changes, the constitu- 
tion for the proposed Provincial Associa- 
tions will read as follows : 

1. The Dominion shall be divided into six Pro- 
vinces, as follows : 

(a) Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and 
Cape Breton. 

(b) New Brunswick. 

(c) Quebec. 

(d) Ontario. 

(e) Manitoba and the Territories, 
(f! British Columbia. 



2. The Provincial Association shall consist of 
master plumbers, gas, steam and hot water fitters 
residents of the different Provinces aforenamed. 

3. Wherever local associations are formed all 
master plumbers must be members of the local 
association in the town. Wherever there is no 
local association formed, a master plumber may 
affiliate with the nearest local association or may 
become a member of the Provincial Association. 

4. Representation to Provincial Associations 
shall be 1 in 5 or fraction thereof. 

5 The meetings shall be held not less than twice 
a year, date of mi eting to be left in the hands of 
the Executive Committee of the Provincial Associ- 
ations, such dates not to conflict with the annual 
meeting of the National Association. 

6. T his Association shall be known as The 
National Association of Master Plumbers, Gas, 
Steam and Hot Water Fitte s of the Province 
of 

7. This Association is organized for sanitary, 
commercial and social purposes, and has for its 
special object the advancement of the trade in all 
the latest discoveries of science appertaining to 
sanitary laws ; to promote and combine the inter- 
ests and influence of members for the protection of 
the trade against imposition, injustice or encroach- 
ment upon our common rights or interests, en- 
couraging iiiventions and improvements in sani- 
tary appliances; fostering an interchange tf 
thought, and eliciting and communica'ing for the 
benefit cf each member the best talent and result 
of the experience and ability of all; to promote 
amicable relations with employes on the basis of 
mutual interest and equitable justice to both 
journeymen and master plumber ; to encourage 
Dominion and Provincial legislation Or the further- 
ance of the interest of sanitary laws ; to secure for 
the members of the trade equitable treatment in 
their dealings with manufacturers and dealers in 
supplies; to regulate the system of apprenticeship 
and employment, so as to prevent as far as practi- 
cable the evil growing out of deficient training in 
the responsible duties of selecting, arranging and 
fitting up materials relating to the hydraulic and 
sanitary condition of dwellings, public and private 
institutions; to create and maintain a sanitary code 
at as high a standard as the progress of science 
(chemical, philosophical and mechanical know- 
ledge) teaches. And we agree to carry forward, 
with tireless zeal, the great work to which the 
above language relates. 

8. Its officers shall consist of a President, Vice- 
President, Financial and Recording Secretary, 
Treasurer and Executive Committee. 

The Executive Committee shall consist ot the 
President, Vice-President, Financial and Record- 
ing Secretary, Treasurer, retiring President and a 
delegate from each Province represented in the 
Association, who shall be elected at the annual 
meeting, said elected delegate to be known and 
designated Vice-President of the Province he repre- 
sents. The President shall be chairman of the Ex- 
ecutive Committee. 

9. Provincial Associations composed of Local 
Associations and individual members not recognized 
by the National Association, as associations or indi- 
viduals, but as a Provincial Association, shall have 
the same representation, and shall elect delegates 
at their Provincial Conventions previous to the 
meeting of the National Convention. 

10. The officers of the Association, and the dele- 
gates elected by the Provincial or Local Associa- 
tions, when in convention shall constitute the 
National Association. 

Where less than five master plumbers are located 
in one city or town, they must become members cf 



the nearest Local Association in order to be repre- 
sented at the Provincial Association. 

No individual member or members will be ad- 
mitted to members* ip from cities where Associa- 
tions are organized and in affiliation with the 
National Association, nor from Provinces where 
Provincial Associations are organized and repre- 
sented as prescribed in Article IV., second clause. 

All Local Associations in any Province must be 
Affiliated with their respective Provincial Associa- 
tions, if such exist, in order to be recognized and 
have membership in the National Association of the 
Dominion. 

Only one Association will be recognized in any 
one city or town. 

11. Religious and political questions shall be 
utterly excluded from the debates and other exer- 
cises of this Association. 

12. The annual election of officers for the ensuing 
year shall be held at annual Conventions convened 
at the time and place declared b» the Association 
at the preceding Convention, the term of office to 
begin immediately upon the election to and accept- 
ance of the office. 

13. The officers of this Association shall be 
elected by ballot, and each officer elected shall 
have a majority of the votes cast. 

14. A constitut : ona! quorum of the Association 
shall consis' of 10 membeis. in good standing. 

15. This Association shall be governed by the 
Parliamentary law as laid down in Cushing's 
Manual, when it does not conflict with the Consti- 
tution and By-laws. 

16. All Associations in arrears with their dues 
shall be dealt with by the Provincial Association, 
annually, as in its wisdom it may deem best. 

17. All Local Associations when organized will 
at once notify the Secreiary of the Provincial Asso- 
ciation, giving the names of its officers and mem- 
bers; a'so any change in officers from time to time 
and furnish the Secretary of the Provincial Associa- 
tion twice a year with a list of the members in good 
standing. 

18. The duties of the officers of this Association 
shall be the same as in all civic societies, unless 
otherwise specified by the Constiiution and By- 
laws, the Vice-President taking the chair in the 
absence of the President ; and should both of these 
officers be absent the officer next in order of men- 
tion in the Constitution will call the Association to 
order, and the members shall elect a temporary 
chairman. 

19. All Local Associations and Conventions shall 
be subordinate to the National Association, and 
obey its Constitution and By-laws. 

20. All amendments to the Constitution shall be 
proposed in writing, and must be in the hands of 
the Secretary 30 days before the annual meeting of 
the Association, and two-thirds majority shall be 
required for their adoption. 

21. Nothing in Article XV. shall prevent a 
change in the Constitution, provided the same 
meets with the unanimous consent of the National 
Association. 

22. The Dominion Supply Association shall be 
asked to furnish a list of supply houses in sympathy 
with the Association quarterly, which list shall be 
endorsed by the President and Secretary of the 
National Association. The Secretary of each 
Provincial shall be asked to furnish each supply 
house in the list furnished as above with a list of 
ma.ter plumbers in good standing at the last 
regular meeting. No member's name shall be 
furnished who shall refuse to pay sight draft for 
arrears in dues. 

23. Each Provincial Association shall assess and 
collect such quarterly dues as shall be required for 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



31 



general expenses, including per capita tax to 
National Association. Dues shall be paid in 
advance quarterly, and it shall be the duty of the 
Treasurer to make sight drafts on all members 
(with exchange) three months in arrears at the 
regular time of meeting. Members refusing to 
pay such drafts shall be suspended and dealt with 
at the next regular meeting. 

PERMANENT SECRETARY. 

The question of appointing a permanent 
secretary, deferred from the morning ses- 
sion of the previous} day, was again taken 
up. and after some discussion it was finally 
decided to leave the matter with the morn- 
ing executive committee, the idea being i" 
allow the incoming secretary to employ 
what clerical assistance might be found 
necessary. 

Votes "t thanks were tendered to the 

press, to the local Association of Master 

Plumbers, and to the City Council. 
THE TREASURER'S SURPLUS. 

Treasurer Lamarehe presented his report. 
It showed receipts to lie 8303.21 and expen- 
ditures, $226.61; while the balance in hand. 
taking into account what was carried over 
in mi last yearj was $293.22. 

THE NEW OFFICERS. 

The election of officers resulted as fol- 
low - . 

Past- President — W. H. Meredith, Toronto. 

President — John McKinley, Ottawa. 

Vice-President — Frank Powers, Lunenburg, N.S. 

Secretary — H. A. Knox, Ottawa. 

Treasurer— Aid. Lamarehe, Montreal. 

Vice-President for Ontario— W. Manseli, 
Toronto. 

Vice-President for Quebec— John Watson. 

Vice-President for Nova Scotia— G. A. Perrier, 
Halifax. 

Vice-President for New Brunswick — James 
Walker, St. John. 

Vice-President for British Columbia— J. H. 
Wilson, Toronto. 

Vice-President for Manitoba— Capt. J. A. 
Giroux, Montreal, 

Chairmen of Committes — Apprenticeship, R. 
Ross, Toronto ; Legislative, E. B. Butterworth, 
Ottawa ; Sanitary, J. W. Hughes, Montreal ; Essay, 
George Morton, Yarmouth, N.S. 

Sub-Executive— President McKinley, Aid. La- 
marehe, H. A. Knox, John Watson, F. G. John- 
ston. 

Speeches were made by the new officers 
and by retiring President Meredith, who 
was nominated, but would not stand for 

IV elect inn. 

The Auditing Committee reported the 
treasurer's books were, correct, and urged 
that a vote of thanks be tendered Treasurer 
Lamarehe for the faithful and excellent ser- 
vices he had rendered. The suggestion was 
henrtih concurred in. 

Hearty votes of thanks were also ten- 
dered retiring President Meredith and retir- 
ing Secretary Manseli. 

At the suggestion of the president, the 
president was instructed to recognize in a 
special manner the telegram of Mr. Wi^s. 
of The Mechanics Supply Co.. Quebec. 

On motion of Messrs. Allison and Ross, 



accounts aggregating $221.86 were ordered 

to be paid. 

DEFINITION OF A PLUMBER. 

Aid. Lamarehe said that there appealed 
to be some misunderstanding in regard to 
the definition of a master plumber when 
local organizations were being formed. He 
held a master plumber to be one who works 
in the plumbing, steamfitting and gas- 
fitting lines, roofing, tinsmithing. and is a 
member of any local association. He 

moved a motion to that effect. He further 
explained that what he wanted to get at 
was that a plumber should not be debarred 
from joining a local association because he 
also encaged in steamfitting or roofing. 

Mr. Pennington said he had great 
pleasure in seconding the resolution. 

Mr. Manseli declared that it was a local 
matter. 

The subject was finally dropped. 

Aid. Lamarehe, of Montreal, expressed 
regret that since the last annual meeting 
of The National Association, death had 
removed Her Majesty Queen Victoria, and 
it was only fitting that the delegates 
should sing " God Save the King." This 
was done, and then followed by " Anld 
Lane Syne." This was at 9.15 p.m., and 
the business of the convention was closed. 



AN AFTERNOON AT LONG BRANCH. 

Friday afternoon, with the business of 
the convention closed, the delegates and 
their friends gave themselves up to pleasure. 
At 3.30 the delegates, the representa- 
tives of the supply houses and a fair sprink- 
ling of ladies assembled on the lawn of the 
Government House, where, with a green 
bank for a background and spacious elm 
trees for a shade, an excellent group picture 
was taken, a cut of which we print else- 
where. 

After the picture was taken, electric cars 
were boarded at York and King streets, and 
a trip was made around the belt line and 
along King street to Sunnyside, where light 
refreshments were served. Electric cars 
were then taken for Long Branch. There it 
was delightfully cool, and most of the party 
were satisfied to stroll around the grounds 
or sit beneath the magnificent shade trees 
that abounded. A few, however, went to 
see a three-inning baseball match between 
teams representing the master plumbers 
and the manufacturers, the result being a 
victory for the latter by 4 to 3. The manu- 
facturers' nine consisted of Adam Taydor, 
W. Taylor, J. Foster, C. World, C. Brittain, 
J. Taylor, R. Morrison, E. A. Rogers, Aleck. 
Saunders. That of the plumbers' was as 
follows: Geo. Cooper, McCollough, Mc- 
Mullen, Bates, Richardson, Fulton, Clapper- 
ton, Pickard. 

At 7 o'clock p.m. dinner was announced, 
and, as an appetizing and ample menu had 
been provided, the couple of hundred ladies 
and gentlemen who were present were able to 



satisfy an appetite which had been made 
keen by the afternoon's enjoyment. Dinner 
over, a concert was held in the pavilion, and 
after that came dancing, which only ceased 
when it was necessary to catch the last car 
for home. 

JOINT ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE. 

One of the most pleasing features of the 
convention was the hearty manner in which 
the manufacturers and supply houses and 
the local master plumbers cooperated in 
entertaining the visiting delegates. And 
their efforts were so successful that one could 
not conceive of its being more so. The joint 
committee was made up as follows : 

A. A. McMichael, Jas. Robertson Co., 
Limited, chairman ; H. W. Anthes, Toronto 
Foundry Co., vice-chairman; J. H. Wilson, 
John Ritchie Plumbing Co., treasurer; A. G. 
Booth, Booth Copper Co., Limited, secre- 
tary ; Adam Taylor, Dominion Radiator 
Co.; T. B. Alcock, Gurney Foundry Co., 
Limited; Alex. Fleming, Ontario Lead Co.; 
Chas. J. Brittain, Jas. Morrison Brass 
Manufacturing Co., Limited ; Wm. H. Mere- 
dith, R. H. Lear & Co.; H. Hogarth, Fiddes 
& Hogarth; J. E. Fullerton, Fullerton & 
McMullen; Alex. Purdy, Purdy, Manseli & 
Co.; Kenneth J. Allison. 

CONVENTION NOTES. 

Well, well ! 

On to Halifax ! 

Hurrah for McKinley and expansion! 

Mr. Joseph Wright was absent, but not 
forgotten. 

The convention could not resist the 
Powers that be, and had to consent to go 
to Halifax. 

The National Association of Master 
Plumbers of Canada has, like the United 
States, a McKinley for president. 

The banquet menu card was unique and 
elaborate and well worthy of being pre- 
served as a souvenir. 

Each convention brings the French and 
English-speaking delegates closer together, 
and it is to be hoped the joints are being so 
well wiped that they will never sever. 

There were no less than four Taylors 
looking after the welfare of the plumbers, 
and the stitches of friendship they put in 
are likely to hold. 

The new secretary of the National Asso- 
ciation is one of a family of five boys, three 
of whom are plumbers. He came to Ottawa 
from London, Eng., in 1889, and until start- 
ing in business in 1891 was employed by 
local firms. 



PERSONAL MENTION. 

Mr. Wm. H. Evans, of The Canada 
Paint Co., Limited, Montreal, has left for 
a io weeks' trip to Europe. 

Mr. A. E. Domville, of The St. Thomas, 
Ont., Car Wheel Co., Limited, arrived home 
this week after a visit of io months in Great 
Britain and Ireland. While away he 
superintended the construction of a large 
plant which his company has erected at 
Barrow-in Furness. 

Mr. Milton Carr, general storekeeper, 
Powassan, and Liberal candidate for the 
Legislature to represent Parry Sound 
district, was in Toronto a few days ago. 

Mr. R. J. Walkem, hardware merchant, 
Tottenham, Ont., was in Toronto this week. 
He said that building operations, particu- 
larly in regard to barn construction, were 
good in his part of the country, while the 
crop outlook was excellent. 



32 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



PACKING GOODS FOR FOREIGN MARKETS. 



OWING to the distance and the 
change from land to water haul 
and back again to land haul, the 
use of proper packages for goods exported 
from America to European countries has 
become of vital importance. The matter 
has received so much attention of late, on 
both sides of the Atlantic, that United States 
Consul Fleming, of Edinburgh, in his annual 
report to the Department of State, goes into 
the subject comprehensively. The report, 
though prepared for United States shippers, 
is of equal importance to Canadian ex- 
porters. 

In his introductory remarks Consul Flem- 
ing points out that severe criticism is heard 
regarding the style and quality of cheese 
boxes used. Hams, tobacco, and several 
other articles are also sent from this side of 
the Atlantic in inferior packages. 

In the following paragraphs taken from 
the report, the words following the figure 
(i) denote the more important forms in 
which an article is shipped, the most com- 
mon form being stated first. The matter 
following the figure (2) describes or indi- 
cates the method of packing considered by 
shippers and importers to be the best, or 
gives the opinion commonly held here 
regarding the way packing is now done. 
Where there is practically only one form of 
package or only one way in which an article 
is prepared for shipment, the figures aie 
omitted, and the matter relates to the best 
method of packing or some feature of it, 
or comments on present methods. I should 
add that, although the export case univers- 
ally recognized as the best for all goods 
requiring special protection from moisture is 
a tin-lined or zinc-lined case, where the 
word case is used in these pages, the ordin- 
ary wooden case is meant, unless otherwise 
stated. 

Brooms — 1. Bales, bundles, cases. 2. The im- 
portance of stoutly binding bales and bundles must 
not be overlooked ; otherwise, the best handling 
will not save them from damage, 
be rendered secure enough to withstand very care- 
less usage. 

Handles — 1. Cases, crates, bags, bundles. 2. 
Handles in any sound case are always secure 
enough, as are short handles in bags. To put in 
bundles is poor packing, unless the ends are very 
firmly bound. Those from America are cased and 
come in first-rate condition. 

Bicycles — As a rule, the material of which Am- 
erican crates are made lacks the proper strength. 
The same is true of the cases in which bicycle parts 
are shipped. Solid cases and crates are required, 
as rough handling is always to be expected. 

Bolts and Nuts — 1. Boxes, bags, packages. 2. 
Extra strong cases and tight packing neceesary, 
owing to the weight. Bolts shipped in bags are 
sometimes damaged by water and dampness and 
otherwise. 



Copper ware — Extra strong cases are required, 
and they should be of moderate size. 

Cordage — 1. Bales, bundles, cases. 2. Bales 
bound with the same material and hooped with 
iron. 

Fishing rods — Tightly bound at the ends and in 
the middle with cord and packed in a strong wooden 
box the length of the rods. 

Furniture — Finished furniture of value, such as 
desks and bookcases, reaches its destination in the 
best condition when covered with paper and then 
with matting, or some other soft material, before 
being crated or cased. 

Hardware — 1. Cases, barrels, crates, packages. 
2. Cases from the United States are notably strong. 
The best material is used in making them. 

Ironware — 1. Cases, blooms, bundles, crates, 
barrels. 2. As with general hardware, the cases 
must be strongly made and secured with iron bands. 
They are now. as a rule, quite satisfactory, especi- 
ally those coming to this market from the United 
States. 

Machinery — 1. Cases, crates, pieces. 2. The best 
practice in packing machinery — heavy or light — is 
to firmly fix every piece to the case, either by bolts 
going through the case, or by battens arranged 
inside to securely lock the various pieces in position. 
With heavy machinery, no loose material should be 
used in any case. The American, as well as the 
Scotch, packing of machinery in general has been 
on this plan, and is everywhere commended. 

Nails — 1. Bags, kegs, packages, boxes. 2. Of 
course, kegs are a better protection from dampness 
than bags, but bags are more easily handled and 
are almost universally used, not for this reason 
only, but for the more practical one of economy. 
Bags of nails for Gieat Britain should always con- 
tain 112 lb. each. 

Netting (wire) — 1. Rolls, packs, bundles. 2. 
Mostly in moderate-sized rolls. It is impoitait that 
these be firmly and smoothly fastened at the outer 
edge. 

Paint— 1. Cases, barrels, cans. 2. Principally in 
cans packed in cases. The matter of importance 
is to make the tops of the cans secure. This done, 
any ordinary case is sufficient. 

Tools — 1. In cardboard boxes, packed in strong 
cases of convenient size bound with hoop iron. 

Wire — I. Reels, bundles. 2. The obvious re- 
quirement is to perfectly secure the ends of the 
wire. Yet this is not always done. 



TORONTO SILVERPLATE WINS. 

A very interesting game of baseball was 
played on Saturday afternoon on the North 
Toronto grounds, The Toronto Silverplate 
Co. demonstrating their ability to still con- 
tinue to win their games. This game was 
of unusual interest on account of the keen 
rivalry of the opposing teams. The Toron- 
tos excelled in their stick work ; also their 
work on bases and in tight places deserves 
special commendation, they being steady at 
all stages of the game except the third inning, 
when the Standards gained a comfortable 
lead, which they failed to hold. The To- 
rontos worked consistently, gradually over- 
coming their opponents' lead by their 
superior batting and the excellent work of 



Pitcher Walker, who deserves credit for his 
all round work. The score ; 

T. S.P. Co 16 20 4 

S. S. P. Co 14 10 5 

Battel ies— Walker and Wilk'S ; Charlton, Story and 
Brown ; umpire, Downs. 

The standing of the Silverware Mfg. Co. 
League is as follows : 

Won. Lost. Dr. 

Toronto S P. Co 600 

Standard S. P. Co :... 3 2 1 

Roden Bros 140 

Eckhart Casket Co 1 5 1 



AN ATTRACTIVE HARDWARE 
WINDOW. 

One of the best hardware window dis- 
plays that have been made in Rat Portage, 
Ont., for some time has been in the window 
of the Rat Portage Hardware Co. for over a 
week. By clever arrangement, an excellent 
representation of a railroad locomotive and 
freight train has been made of kitchen ware. 
It has attracted much attention. 



CANADIAN VS. UNITED STATES 
PAINTS. 

Editor Hardware and Metal, —With 
reference to a letter in your last issue signed 
by Mr. Walter H. Cottingham, I find the 
remarks of your reporter, to which he refers, 
are about right. The Canadians can and 
do give points to their United States con- 
freres, and Mr. Cottingham might get his 
practical man to study with advantage the 
object lesson from Canada named in the 
article to which he takes exception. 

As to the quality of American paints. 
Canadians have not forgotten the expose 
made by the Lead Company, of New York, 
some time ago, and any amount of tall talk 
will not wipe that out. 

I may mention that quite recently a 
wealthy United States house sent an expert 
to a Canadian factory for help to solve an 
important difficulty, and he returned en- 
lightened. Even this morning another 
extensive maker inquires on a technical 
matter in which his own laboratory experts 
are in doubt. Nor are these all the 
instances within a year when our experts 
have been invited to cooperate with 
respected friends across the line. 

As to the dollar's worth, it is non pos- 
sumus ; what with the lead trust, zinc trust, 
linseed oil trust, Canadians can afford to 
let them talk. 

Robt. Munro. 
Montreal, July 2, 1901. 



Among the exports to the United States 
last week were 15,260 lb. of " Salada " 
Ceylon tea. 

Inspector W. Wilson, of Victoria, con- 
demned as unfit for use 150 cases of 
imported fruits, principally peaches. They 
were seized and sent back to the shippers. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



33 



BURMAN & SONS' clippers 



Established 1871. 



■% ■ ■«■■ inik •> m -- _ _. _ f° r Horsemen 

BIRMINGHAM, ENG. and Barb " s 




NO. 297. 



NO. 3— POWER CLIPPER, with "Wrist Joint. 

(The Czar of Russia. 
As supplied to-^ ihe King of Denmark. 
(Earl Roberts, Etc., Etc. 





THE "LEOPOLD" TOILET. 



THE "WARWICK" 

CLIPPER. 

Cuts over three teeth. 

As supplied to 

His Majesty's 
War Department. 



SEND FOR PRICE LIST AND TERMS. 

DELORME BROS., Agents, ^Ve"'" Montreal 



BUTLER'S 



FAMOUS 



Sheffield Cutlery. 



Fish and Dessert Knives ; Spoons and Forks ; 
Cabinets and Cases of Cutlery and Plate. 



"UTTTf Eft" was registered a; 
DUlLClV Trade Mai k, A.D 



as a 
1768. 



Sole Makers of the celebrated 

"KEEN" Razors, "CAVENDISH" 

brand of Table Knives and Carvers. 

HIGHEST AWARDS. 



SPECIAL MENTION. 



—Full Line of Samples and stock at— 

George Butler & Co.'s 

k^TooM: 62 HOLBORN VIADUCT, E.C. 

(Over Snow Hill Station.! 
MANUFACTORY : 

Trinity Works, SHEFFIELD, ENG. 



/VvyB 



CLiEARING SEMM 



a 








1st 



Wellington 
Bicycles * * 



£*?7«il5£S5"»l l 












fiS 



«Srw5!3Pw5! 



BBSS 



'Ai 



Lamps, Bells, Cyclometers, 

Saddles, Toe Clips, Wrenches, 

Cements, Oils, Lubricants. 

Caverhill, Learmont & Co., Montreal 

Wholesale Hardware Merchants. 



34 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




QUEBEC MARKETS 

Montreal, July 5, 1901. 
HARDWARE. 

MONTREAL houses have been doing 
a very satisfactory business this 
week, the sorting orders coming to 
hand in large numbers. The demand for 
wires continues fairly good, while nails are 
almost brisk. Horse nails have been 
shipped in some quantities this week. 
Screens and screen wire cloth have been 
in heavy request, while binder twine is 
moving freely. Railway supplies and 
structural material are selling well. The 
local plumbing trade is reported rather 
quiet, and the supply houses are only 
moderately busy. 

Barb Wire— Supplies are none too 
plentiful in the face of a steady demand. 
The price is unchanged at 53 05 per 100 lb. 
f.o.b. Montreal. 

Galvanized Wire — All orders are said 
to have been filled, and shipments can 
be made from stock next week. We 
quote as follows : No. 5, 54- 2 5 '< Nos - 



6, 7 and 8 gauge, $3.55; No. 9, $3.10; 
No. 10, 53.75 ; No. 11, 53.85 ; No. 12, 
S3. 25; No. 13, 53.35; No - H. 54-25; No. 
15, 54.75; No - l6 « *S- 

Smooth Steel Wire — A good deal of 
business has been done this week, but 
orders are not now heavy. We quote 
oiled and annealed as follows : No. 
9, 52.80; No. 10, 52.87; No. ii, 52.90; No. 
12, 52.95; No. 13, 53 T 5 pc 100 lb. f.o.b. 
Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton, London, St. 
John and Halifax. 

Fine Steel Wire — There is nothing 
unusual to report. The discount is un- 
changed at 17^ per cent. 

Brass and Copper Wire — Several 
parcels have been sold this week. The 
discounts are 55 and 1% per cent, on brass, 
and 50 and 2^ per cent, on copper. 

Fence Staples — A sorting trade is being 
done. Wequote: 5325 for bright, and 53.75 
for galvanized, per keg of 100 lb. 

Wire Nails — The wire nail market is 
extremely healthy. A good demand con- 



tinues to be reported, while certain sizes are 
still very scarce. We quote as follows : 
52.85 for small lots and 52.77 «^ for carlots, 
f.o.b. Montreal, London, Toronto, Hamilton 
and Gananoque. 

Cut Nails — Cut nails are 10c. per keg 
higher. The demand is somewhat better 
than that of last year. Shingle nails are in 
good request. We quote : 52 45 for small 
and 52.35 for carlots ; flour barrel nails, 25 
per cent, discount ; coopers' nails, 30 per 
cent, discount. 

Horse Nails — A fairly good trade is 
reported in this line. Discounts are un- 
changed from a week ago. " C " 
brand is held at a discount of 50 
and 7% per cent, off the new list. 
" M " brand is quoted at 60 per cent, 
off old list on oval and city head and 66--. 
per cent, off countersunk head. Monarch's 
discount is 66% per cent., and 70 per cent, 
in 25 box lots. 

Horseshoes — There is a moderate trade 
being done. We quote as follows : Iron 
shoes, light and medium pattern, No. 




Fairy Queen 



Burns coal or wood. 

Has large fire door, and is fitted with 
ash chute. 

Rods are on the outside, insuring 
durability. 

Made in six sizes, giving a large range 
to choose from. 

Full nickeled, making it an attractive 
and cheerful parlor stove. 

The Fairy Queen is a modern stove at 
a low price. 



M 



LONDON, 



TORONTO, 



WINNIPEG, 



VANCOUVER 



AND 



ST. JOHN, N.B. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



35 



THE PAGE-HER8EY 
IRON & TUBE CO. 



-Limited 



Montreal 

Manufacturers of j 

Wrought Iron Pipe 

For Water, Gas, Steam, Oil, 
Ammonia and Machinery. 

DRAIN PIPES, 
PORTLAND CEMENTS, 
FIRE BRICKS AND CLAY 
SILICA AND MAGNESIA 
BRICKS, 

with specially prepared mortar. 

Contractors' and Founders' 
Supplies. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

31 WELLINGTON ST., MONTREAL 

. . FULL STOCK . . 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWER WPE 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

^ CANADIAN SEWER PIPE CO. 

HAMILTON, ONT. TORONTO, ONT. 

ST. JOHNS, QUE. 



Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers of 



Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery where great strength 
£ required ; Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



2 and larger, $3.50; No. 1 and smaller, 
$3.75 ; snow shoes, No. 2 and larger, 
$3-75 ; No. 1 and smaller, $4.00 ; X L 
steel shoes, all sizes, 1 to 5, No. 2 and 
larger, $3.60 ; No. 1 and smaller, $3.85 ; 
feather-weight, all sizes, $4.85; toe weight 
steel shoes, all sizes, $5-95 f.o.b. Montreal; 
f.o.b. Hamilton, London and Guelph, 10c. 
extra. 

Poultry Netting — The demand is rather 
small and the market is featureless. 
We quote 50 and 10 per cent, off list A and 
50 and 5 per cent, off lists B, C and D. 

Green Wire Cloth — There has been 
a heavy run on green wire cloth during the 
past few days. The price is still $1.35. 

Screen Doors and Windows — Quite 
a number of letter orders have been received 
this week for screen doors and windows. 
We quote as follows : Screen doors, plain 
cherry finish, $7.30 per doz.; do. fancy, 
$11.50 per doz.; walnut, $7.30 per doz., 
and yellow, $7.45; windows, $2.25 to $3. 50 
per doz. 

Screws — A sorting-up trade is being 
done. Discounts are : Flat head 
bright, 87X and 10 per cent, off list ; 
round head bright, 82^ and 10 percent.; 
flat head brass, 80 and 10 per cent.; round 
head brass, 75 and 10 per cent. 

Bolts — There is no change to report. A 
moderate inquiry is reported. Discounts 
are as follows : Norway carriage bolts, 
65 per cent. ; common, 60 per cent.; 
machine bolts, 60 per cent. ; coach screws, 
70 per cent. ; sleigh shoe bolts, 72 j£ per 
cent.; blank bolts, 70 per cent.; bolt ends, 
62^ per cent.; plough bolts, 60 per cent.; 
tire bolts, 67^ per cent.; stove bolts, 67X 
per cent. To any retailer an extra discount 
of 5 per cent, is allowed. Nuts, square, 4c. 
per lb. off list ; hexagon nuts, 4)(c. per lb. 
off list. To all retailers an extra discount of 
]iz, per lb. is allowed. 

Building Paper — The local demand is 
only fair, but the country trade is fully up 
to the average. We quote as follows : 
Tarred felt, J 1.70 per 100 lb.; 2-ply ready 
roofing, 80c. per roll ; 3-ply, $1.05 per roll; 
carpet felt, $2.25 per 100 lb.; dry sheath- 
ing. 3 oc - P er ro 'l ; tar sheathing, 40c. 
per roll ; dry fibre, 50c. per oil tarred fibre, 
60c. per roll ; O.K. and I.X.L., 65c. per 
roll ; heavy straw sheathing, $28 per ton ; 
slaters' felt, 50c. per roll. 

Rivets and Burrs — A small trade is 
passing at unchanged quotations. Dis- 
counts on best iron rivets, section, carriage, 
and wagon box, black rivets, tinned do., 
coopers' rivets and tinned swedes rivets, 
60 and 10 per cent.; swedes iron burrs 
are quoted at 55 per cent, off; copper 
rivets, 35 and 5 percent, off; and coppered 
iron rivets and burrs, in 5-lb. carton 



Plates and Sheets 

Tank, Boiler and Firebox Plates, 
Lysaght's Best Steel Sheets. 

Low Prices for Import to Wholesale Buyers. 

Sanderson's Tool Steel 



in 
Stock. 



A. G. LESLIE k CO. 

MONTREAL. 



IRON AND 
BRASS 



Pumps 



Force, Lift and Cistern 
Hand and Powe ■ . 

For all duties. We can 
supply your wants with 
— quality the best and 
prices right. Catalogues 
and full information for a 
request. 



THE H. McDOUGALL CO., Limited 

Manufacturers, Gait, Canada. 

ADAM HOPE & CO. 

Hamilton, Ont. 




We have in stock 



PIG TIN 
INGrOT COPPER 
LAKE COPPER 
PIG- LEAD 
SPELTER 
ANTIMONY 

WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS. 

Nova Scotia Steel Go. 

Limited 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 



Manufacturers of 



Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMENS MARTIN 

Open Hearth Steel 



36 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



astilite Varnish 



For inside, for outside, for buildings, 
for carriages, for front doors, for boats, 
for furniture, for bathrooms, for anything 
and everything to be beautified or pre- 
served by varnishing. 

Why carry a stock of five or six dif- 
ferent lines of varnish when ELASTILITE 
will fill the bill for them all ? 

Put up in ^ pints to i gallon sealed 
with our Brass Cap. 

THIS IS WHAT A CUSTOMER SAYS ABOUT ELASTILITE : 

"When once tried, when in need of more varnish 
my customers usually ask for the same as they had bought 
from me before." 



MANUFACTURED ONLY BY 



l e Imperial Varnish & Color Co. 



TORONTO, ONT., CANADA. 



LIMITED 



Binder Twine Binder Twine 

The John Bowman 
Hardware & Coal Co., 

London, Ont. 

Write us for close prices on 
best quality American 
Binder Twine. 

Binder Twine Binder Twine 



boxes, are quoted at 60 and 10 per cent, 
off list. 

Binder Twine — The demand is increas- 
ing. Prices are unchanged. We quote : 
Blue Ribbon, iij£c. ; Red Cap, 9^c. ; 
Tiger, 8^c; Golden Crown, 8c; Sisal, 
8^c. 

Cordage — Business is fair in cordage. 
Manila is worth I3^c. per lb. for 7 16 and 
larger ; sisal brings 10c. and lath yarn, 10c. 

Harvest Tools — Scythes and snaths 
are in good request, and other lines are 
moving fairly well. The discount is 50, 
10 and 5 per cent. 

Spades and Shovels — Spades and 
shovels are moving but slowly. The dis- 
count is 40 and 5 per cent. 

Lawn Mowers — A few scattered orders 
are still coming to hand. We quote : High 
wheel, 50 and 5 per cent, f.o.b. Montreal; 
low wheel, in all sizes, $2.75 each net ; 
high wheel, 11 -inch, 30 per cent. off. 

Firebricks — The inquiry is limited. 
We quote : Scotch at 5 17. 50 to 522 and 
English at J17 to $21 per 1,000 ex 
wharf. 

Cement — The absence of large works 
accounts for the fact that no larger sales are 
being made. The country demand has 
shown some slight improvement this week. 
We quote : German cement, $2.35 to 
$2.50; English, $2.25 to $2.35 ; Belgian, 



Si. 70 to #1.95 per bbl. ex wharf, and 
American, 52.30 to $2.45, ex cars. 

METALS. 

This week we have to report a rather 
quiet trade in metals. Pig iron is slow, and 
while the sheet metals are firm and scarce, 
the demand does not seem to be extraor- 
dinarily heavy. English mills still decline 
to take any orders for shipment before 
September or October. Most importers 
have arranged for their summer and fall 
importations. 

Pig Iron — The demand for pig iron is 
rather slow, and prices are in buyers' favor. 
We quote No. 1 Summerleeat $20 to $20. 50 
and No. 1 Canadian at 5*7-50 to $18 per 
ton. 

Bar Iron — There is a good demand for 
bar iron at steady and firm prices. General 
quotations are $1 .75 to $ 1.80 for merchants' 
bar and $2 for horseshoe. 

Black Sheets — Black sheets are still 
quite scarce and arrivals are very light. 
We quote : 8 to 16 gauge, 52.50 to 52.60 ; 
26 gauge, 52.55 to 52 65, and 28 gauge, 
52.60 to 52.70. 

Galvanized Iron — The market remains 
very firm, with the demand quite steady. 
We quote as follows : No. 28 Queen's 
Head, 54. 50 ; Apollo, 10%" oz., 54-5Q, and 
Comet, 54 30, with a 10c. reduction for case 
lots. 



Copper — Quite a number of small lots 
have been sold at 17^ to 18 c. 

Ingot Tin — Is steady at 32 to 33c. for 
Lamb and Flag. 

Lead — No change. Fair amounts are 
selling at 53-75- 

Lead Pipe — Trade is moderate. We 
quote : 7c. for ordinary and 7J£c. for com- 
position waste, with 30 per cent. off. 

Iron Pipe — The demand has been 
very good, and the market is steady. 
We quote as follows : Black pipe, %, 53 
per 100 ft.; #. 53 ; X A> $3 °5 '. X> *3-3o ; 
i-in., 54-75; l %> $6-45: i#. 57-75; 
2-in. 510.35. Galvanized, %, 54.60; %, 
55.25; i-in., 57-5°; J X. $9- 8 ° J I &- 
511.75 ; 2-in., 516. 

Tinplates — Latest advices from England 
report the market firm and the mills over- 
sold. The demand here is rather quiet. 
We quote: Coke plates, 53.75 to 54; 
charcoal. 54.25 to 54 5° ; extra quality, 55 
to 55.10. 

Canada Plate — Sixty - sheet Canada 
plate is still abnormally scarce. Otherwise, 
there is no feature. We quote : 52' s, 
52.45; 6o's, 52.55; 75' s . 52.6o; full 
polished, 53, and galvanized, 53-9°- 

Steel — Unchanged. We quote : Sleigh- 
shoe, 51.95 ; tire, 52 ; bar, $1.95; spring, 
52.75 ; machinery, 52 75, and toe-calk, 
52.50. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



37 



Sheet Steel — We quote : Nos. 22 and 
24, $3, and Nos. 18 and 20, $2.85. 

Tool Steel— Black Diamond, 8c. and 
Jessop's, 13c. 

Terne Plates — Terne plates are scarce, 
but, as the demand is quiet, the stringency 
is not felt very severely. The ruling price 
is $7 50. 

Coil Chain — Quite a demand has 
^sprung up for coil chain, which has been 
ordered in some quantity. We quote 
as follows: No. 6, nj£c; No. 5, 10c; 
No. 4, 9J£c. ; No. 3, 9c. ; j^-inch, 
7>£c. per lb. ; 5-16, $4. 85 ; 5-16 exact, 

$5-3°; H< $4-4°; 7-16. $420; #,$3.95; 

9-16, 53.85; ft, S3.55; X, $3.45 ; 7/i, 
S3. 40 ; i-in., S3. 35. In carload lots an 
allowance of 10c. is made. 

Sheet Zinc — Quite a quantity has been 
taken this week at $5 75 to $6.25. 

Antimony — Quiet, at 10c. 

Zinc Spelter — Is worth 5c. 

Solder— We quote : Bar solder, iS'^c. ; 
wire solder, 20c. 

GLASS. 

There is no change to report. We quote : 
First break, $2. 10; second, $2.20 for 
50 feet ; first break, 100 feet, $3. 90 ; 
second, $4. 10; third, $4. 60; fourth, $4. 85; 
fifth, 55.35 ; sixth, 55.85, and seventh, 

56.35- 

RAINTS AND OILS. 

Linseed oil, on account of the scarcity, 
has been advanced 3c. per gallon. The 
demand from the country for this article is 
not brisk. The trade in paints is only now 
beginning to taper off, having been remark- 
ably well maintained. We quote : 

White Lead — Best brands, Government 
standard, 56.25 ; No. 1, $5.87^ ; No. 2, 
55.50; No. 3, $5.12^, and No. 4. 54.75 
all f.o.b. Montreal. Terms, 3 per cent, cash 
or four months. 

Dry White Lead — 55-25 in casks ; 
kegs, 55-50. 

Red Lead — Casks, 5500; in kegs, 

*S-25- 

Dry White Zinc — Pure.dry, 6#c. ; No. 
li 5X C -I in oil, pure, 7%c.\ No. 1, 6^c; 
No. 2, 5X C - 

Putty — Wequote : Bulk.in barrels, 51. 90 
per 100 lb.; bulk, in less quantity, 52.05 ; 
bladders, in barrels, 52.10; bladders, in 
100 or 200 lb. kegs or boxes, 52.25; in tins, 
52.55 to 52.65 ; in less than 100-lb. lots, 
53 f.o.b. Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, 
Hamilton, London and Guelph. Maritime 
Provinces 10c. higher, f.o.b. St. John and 
Halifax. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 83c; boiled, 86c, 
in 5 to 9 bbls., ic. less, 10 to 20 bbl. lots, 
open, net cash, plus 2c. for 4 months. 
Delivered anywhere in Ontario between 
Montreal and Oshawaat 2c. per gal. advance 
and freight allowed. 



Turpentine — Single bbls., 55c; 2 to 4 
bbls., 54c; 5 bbls. and over, open terms, 
the same terms as linseed oil. 

Mixed Paints — 5120 to 51.45 per gal. 

Castor Oil — 8^ to 9#c. in wholesale 
lots, and %z. additional for small lots. 

Seal Oil — 47 yi to 49c. 

Cod Oil — 32 >£ to 35c. 

Naval Stores — We quote : Resins, 
52.75 to 54- 50, as to brand ; coal tar, S3. 25 
to S3- 7 5 ; cotton waste, 4% to 5J£c. for 
colored, and 6 to 7%c. for white ; oakum, 
5^ to 6j£c, and cotton oakum, 10 to 11c. 

Paris Green — Petroleum barrels, i6^c. 
per lb. ; arsenic kegs, 17c; 50 and 100- 
lb. drums, I7>£c. ; 25-lb. drums, 18c; i-lb- 
packages, i8j£c; ^-lb. packages, 20 ^c; 
i-lb. tins, I9j£c; J^-lb. tins, 21 %c. f.o.b. 
Montreal; terms 3 percent. 30 days, or four 
months from date of delivery. 

SCRAP METALS. 

A lively market is again reported in scrap 
metals which are quoted without change. 
Dealers are now paying the following prices 
in the country : Heavy copper and wire, 13 
to I3^c. per lb.; light copper, 12c; heavy 
brass, 12c; heavy yellow, %y 2 to 9c; light 
brass, 6yi to 7c; lead, zyi to2^"c. per lb.; 
zinc, 2% to 2^c; iron, No. 1 wrought, S14 
to S16 per gross ton f.o.c. Montreal; No. 5 
cast, S13 to S14; stove plate, 58 to 59; light 
iron, No. 2, 54 a ton; malleable and steel, 
54; rags, country, 60 to 70c. per 100 lb.; old 
rubbers, 7#c per lb. 

HIDES. 

The market is very firm and an advance 
in lambskins is expected next week. We 
quote : Light hides, 7c. for No. 1 ; 6c. for 
No. 2, and 5c. for No. 3. Lambskins, 
15c; sheepskins, 90c. to Si ; calfskins, 
ioc. for No. 1 and 8c. for No. 2. 



notes. 
Linseed oil is scarce and 3c. per gallon 
higher. 

Cut nails are advanced ioc. per keg. 
Paris green has been advanced 2c. per 
lb., and is very scarce. 



ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Toronto, July 5, 1901. 

HARDWARE. 

NO particularly striking feature has 
developed on the local market dur- 
ing the past week. Owing to the 
holiday season and the hot weather, busi- 
ness is naturally not as brisk as it was. 
There is still, however, a fairly good move- 
ment. In fact, in some lines, such as 
refrigerators, ice cream freezers, and oil 
stoves, the demand exceeds the supply. 
The demand for wire nails continues active, 
and prices firm. Cut nails are firm at the 
recent advance, but very little business is 




Our Sheet 
Metal Fronts 



Offer you splendid improvement, at 
small cost, for any style of building. 

We make them complete, to suit 
any sized or shaped structure — the 
entire metal finish including - door and 
window caps, cornices, etc. — in a great 
variety of styles. 

They give a very handsome effect, 
and enduring, practical satisfaction. 

We give estimates if you send 
measurements and outline of the build- 
ing. 

Think it over. 

Metallic R^oofing Co., 

Limited, 

Wholesale Manufacturers, 

Toronto, Canada. 



being done. Harvest tools are going out 
fairly well. Business in fence wires is 
falling off, as is to be expected after the 
recent active trade. The manufacturers 
have concluded their meeting in St. John, 
but have made no further change than was 
noted last week in regard to cut nails. 
Cotton twines are lower. Rope is in good 
demand, particularly certain sizes. Quite 
an active trade is being done in nearly all 
lines which are required for harvest tools. 

Barb Wire — Business is just moderate 
and prices unchanged. We quote #3.05 
per 100 lb. from stock Toronto ; and 
$2.82^ f.o.b. Cleveland for less than car- 
lots, and $2.70 for carlots. 

Galvanized Wire— Business is fair, 
with prices steady and unchanged. We 
quote : Nos. 6, 7 and 8, $3.50 to $3.85 
per 100 lb., according to quantity ; No. 9, 
$2.85 to $3.15 ; No. io, $3.60 to $3.95 ; 
No. 11, $3.70 to $4. 10 ; No. 12, S3 to 
$3.30 ; No. 13, S3. 10 to S3. 40 ; No. 14, 
$4. 10 to $4 50 ; No. 15. $4 60 to $5 05 : 
No. 16, $4.85 to $5.35. Nos. 6 to 9 base 
f.o.b. Cleveland are quoted at $2.57^ in 
less than carlots and 12c. less for carlots of 
15 tons. 

Smooth Steel Wire — The demand for 
oiled and annealed wire has dropped off 
quite a little, and the movement is now 
light. The demand for hay-baling wire is 
still practically nil. Net selling prices for 
oiled and annealed are : Nos. 6 to 8, $2.90; 
9, $2.80; 10, $2.87 ; 11, #2.90 ; 12, $2.95; 

13. $315; H. #3-37 ; IS. #3-5° ; l6 . 
$3 65. Delivery points, Toronto, Hamilton, 
London and Montreal, with freights equal- 
ized on those points. 



38 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Wire Nails — The factories are very 
busy, and there is a scarcity in some sizes. 
Some of the orders that are being received 
are for good quantities. The base price is 
still $2.85 for less than carlots, and $2.77% 
for carlots. Delivery points: Toronto, Hamil- 
ton, London, Gananoque and Montreal. 

Cut Nails — Prices are firm at last week's 
advance, but there is very little business 
being done. In fact, trade is almost alto- 
gether confined to shingle nails. The base 
price is $2.45 per keg for less than carlots, 
and 52.35 for carlots. Delivery points : 
Toronto, Hamilton, London, Montreal and 
St. John, N.B. 

Horse Nails — Business is seasonably 
quiet, and prices are unchanged. Discount 
on "C" brand, oval head, 50 and 7% per 
cent, off new list, and on "M" and other 
brands, 50, 10 and 5 per cent, off the old 
list. Countersunk head 60 per cent. 

Horseshoes — Business is still of a 
small sorting. up character. We quote 
f.o.b. Toronto as follows : Iron shoes, 
No. 2 and larger, light, medium and 
heavy, $3.60 ; snow shoes, $3.85 ; light 
steel shoes, $3.70; featherweight (all sizes), 
$4.95; iron shoes, No. 1 and smaller, light, 
medium and heavy (all sizes), $3-85 ; snow 
shoes, $4 ; light steel shoes, $3.95; feather- 
weight (all sizes), $4.95. 

Screws — Business in screws continues 
much as it has been for some time, namely, 
fairly good, with prices steady. Discounts 
are as follows : Flat head bright, 
87^ and 10 per cent. ; round head 
bright, %2}4 and 10 per cent.; flat head 
brass, 80 and 10 per cent.; round head brass, 
75 and 10 per cent. ; round head bronze, 
65 per cent., and flat head bronze at 70 
per cent. 

Rivets and Burrs — A steady trade is 
still to be noted. We quote : Iron rivets, 
60 and 10 per cent.; iron burrs, 55 per 
cent.; copper rivets and burrs, 25 and 5 per 
cent. 

Bolts and Nuts — The demand for prac- 
tically all kinds of bolts and nuts con- 
tinues brisk. We quote : Carriage bolts 
(Norway), full square, 65 per cent. ; carriage 
bolts full square, 65 per cent. ; common 
carriage bolts, all sizes, 60 per cent. ; 
machine bolts, all sizes, 60 per cent. ; coach 
screws, 70 per cent.; sleighshoe bolts, 72 j£ 
per cent. ; blank bolts, 60 per cent. ; bolt 
ends, 62*4 per cent.; nuts, square, 4c. off; 
nuts, hexagon, 4J£c. off; tire bolts, 67% 
per cent.; stove bolts, 67 yi ; plough bolts, 
60 per cent. ; stove rods, 6 to 8c. 

Rope — Business is active in rope, par- 
ticularly for y% inch size for hay fork 
pulleys, etc. In this size the demand 
exceeds the supply. The base price is un- 
changed at ioc. for sisal and 13 %c. for 
manila. 



Binder Twine — A fair trade has been 
doing, and some of the factories report that 
they are pretty well sold up. A fairly good 
sorting- up trade is still expected. 

Cotton Twine — Prices are about i^c. 
per lb. lower, and there is a fair movement. 
We quote wrapping cotton, 3-ply, 18c; 4- 
ply, 24c. 

Sporting Goods — There is not a great 
deal being done, but an improvement is 
looked for. 

Enamelled Ware and Tinware — 
Trade in both these lines is only moderate. 
There has been some preserving kettles 
sold for the strawberry season, but the bulk 
of the trade in this line of goods has yet to 
be done. 

Oil and Gas Stoves — The demand for 
oil stoves has been extremely brisk during 
the past week or two. Some of the large 
dealers report that their stocks are pretty 
well broken up, and they are expected to 
remain in this condition for the balance of 
the season. Gas stoves are only in moder- 
ate demand. 

Ice Cream Freezers and Rbfriger- 
ators — An exceptionally heavy demand 
has been experienced during the past week 
in ice cream freezers and refrigerators, and 
stocks have become very much depleted. 
Some of the wholesalers have been trying 
to get supplies from the departmental stores 
in order to fill orders, but, as far as we can 
learn, the stocks in the departmental stores 
are also very much exhausted. 

Green Wire Cloth— Trade is fairly 
good at $1.35 per 100 square feet. 

Screen Doors and Windows — A good 
movement is still to be noted in screen 
doors and windows, and a number of ship- 
ments have gone out during the past week. 

Building Paper — Business continues 
seasonably brisk. We quote : Building 
paper, 30c. ; tarred paper, 40c. , and tarred 
roofing, $1-65. 

Poultry Netting — Business continues 
fair, at 55 per cent, discount. 

Harvest Tools — An active business is 
to be noted in harvest tools, and, in fact, in 
all lines of goods which are in demand at 
this time of the year for harvest purposes. 
Discount 50, 10 and 5 per cent. 

Spades and Shovels — Business is 
merely of a Sorting-up nature. Discount, 
40 and 5 per cent. 

Eavetrough — There is still a good 
movement at the ruling price of #3.25 per 
100 ft. for 10 inch. 

Leather Belting — Trade is moderate. 
On account of action taken by tanners, 
there will probably be an advance. The 
price of leather, as has been noted in these 
columns, has been unsettled for some time. 



OAKEY'S 



The original and only Genuine Pre- 
paration for Cleaning Cutlery. 
6d. and is. Canisters. 

WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE POLISH 



JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 

MANUFACTURERS OP 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, London, England. 

Agent : 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL 



COVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, N.Y. 

Steel Carriage and 

Wagon Jacks, 

Harness Snaps, Chain, Rope and Web 
Goods, etc. 

FOR SALE BV JOBBERS AT MFRS. PRICES. 



^ 



fRIE5rS CLIPPERS 

Largest Variety, 

Toilet, Hand, Electric Power] 

ARE THE BEST. 

gheat Quality Grooming and 
Sheep- Shearing Machines. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

8BND FOB CATALOGUE TO 

aaarlea. Shearer Mtg. Co., Itaihna, K.H..C84 





Don't Forget the Name. . . 

NEWMAN'S INVINCIBLE 

FLOOR SPRINGS 

Strong, Quick, Reliable, Effective. 
Will close a door against any pressure of wind. Far 
ahead of ordinary door springs, pneumatic or other- 
wise. Ask your wholesaler. 

W. NEWMAN & SONS, Birmingham. 



Oneida Community Goods 

HALTERS, COW TIES, SNAPS, etc., etc., 

in all sizes and styles. May be had of all 
jobbers throughout Canada. 

Faotory— NIAGARA FALLS, ONT. 



Mackenzie Bros. 

HARDWARE 
MANUFACFURERS' AGENTS, 

Travellers covering Manitoba, j WINNIPEG, 
Northwest Territories and 

British Columbia. '. MAN. 

Correspondence Solicited. 



THE PULLMAN PNEUMATIC 

Combined 



Door Check 
and Spring. 




for Screen Doors. Small, Simple, Strong, Perfect and 
Ornamental. Low in Price. 

PULLMAN SASH BALANCE CO., 

ROCHESTER N.Y., U.S.A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



39 



Discount, extra, 60, 10 and 5 per cent.; 
standard, 70 per cent.; No. 1, 70 and 10 per 
cent. 

Cement — A good, steady trade is 
doing. Prices are firm. We quote 
barrel lots as follows : Canadian port- 
land. $2.25 to $2.75 ; German. $3 to $315; 
English, $3; Belgian, $2.50 to 5275; 
Canadian hydraulic, $1.25 to $1.50. 

METALS. 

Trade, generally, has been rather quiet, 
naturally being influenced to some extent by 
the hot weather and the holiday. Some 
import business is being done in nearly all 
lines, but principally in tinplates, black 
sheets and galvanized sheets. Prices are 
stiffening enough in several lines. 

Pig Iron— The demand is rather quiet. 
Prices are steady throughout. Canadian 
iron on track Toronto we quote at $18 per 
ton for No. 1, $17.50 for No. 2, and $17 for 
No. 3. 

Bar Iron — The demand for bar iron 
continues good, and the mills are still be- 
hind with their orders. The ruling quota- 
tion for small lots is still $1.85 to $1.90. 
Some of the mills are so far behind with 
their orders that they are not soliciting new 
business. 

Steel — Business continues fairly good in 
steel, and prices rule much as before. We 
quote : Merchantable cast steel, 9 to 15c. per 
lb.; drill steel.8 to 10c. per lb ; "B C" and 
"Black Diamond" tool steel, 10 tone; 
Jessop's, Morton's and Firth's tool steel, 
12^ to 13c; toe calk steel, $2.85 to $3; 
tire steel, $2 30 to $2.50; sleighshoe steel, 
$2. 10 to $2.25 ; reeled machinery steel, 
$3; hoop steel, $3. 

Galvanized Sheets — The feeling in 
regard to galvanized sheets is still decidedly 
firm, and importers are compelled to pay 
ioc. 'per 100 lb. by the case higher than a 
short time ago. The demand locally keeps 
fairly good, and stocks are now in fairly 
good shape. The ruling quotation on 28 
^auge English is $4. 50 and on American 
#4 40. 

Black Sheets — A fair trade is being 
done. We quote : 28 gauge, common 
sheets at $3, and dead flat at $3. 50. 

Canada Plates — There is just a mod- 
erate trade being done. This market is 
also firm as to price, and values are from 
10 to 15c. higher than a short time ago. 
The ruling quotations here are : All dull, 
$2.90; half polished, $3, and all bright, 
$3.50. 

Pig Tin — The demand during the past 
week has been rather quiet. There have 
been some fluctuations in the outside mar- 
kets, but locally we still quote as before. In 
London on Wednesday prices closed £1 
5s. above the previous night's quotations. 




NICHOLSON 



OO., Providence, R.I., U.S.A. 



BRITISH PLATE GLASS COMPANY, Limited. 



Established 1773 



Manufacturers of Polished, Silvered, Bevelled, Chequered, and Rough Plate Glass. Also 

of a durable, highly-polished material called " MARBLETTE," suitable for Advertising Tablets, Signs, 
Facias, Direction Plates, Clock Faces, Mural Tablets, Tombstones, etc. This is supplied plain, embossed, 
or with incised gilt letters. Benders, Embossers, Brilliant Cutters, etc., etc. Estimates and 
Designs on application. 
Works: Ravenhead, St. Helens, Lancashire. Agencies : 107 Cannon Street, London, E.C — 128 Hope Street, Glas- 
gow— 12 East Parade, Leeds, and 36 Par. dise Street, Birmingham. Telegraphic Address: "Glass, St. Helens" 
Telephone No. 68 St. Helens. 



F-OFR SAL! 



RE-LAYING RAILS 



350 tons 56. 
75 tons 50. 
20 tons 14. 

Prompt Deliveries. 



SESSENWEIN BROS., 101 Shannon Street, 



rail and fastenings. 

Also Logging and Pit Rails. 

MONTREAL. 



In New York, however, prices were nominal 
on account of absence of business. Spot 
tin is said to be cornered in London. As 
far as futures are concerned, the market 
appears to be weak. 

Tinplates — The demand for tinplates 
during the past week has been fair. Prices 
are firm and some of the wholesale houses 
have marked their prices up to #4 70 for 
I. C. Others, however, still quote $4.50. 

Tinned Sheets — Trade is good in this 
line, and we still quote 28 gauge at 8j£c. 

Copper — There is not much doing in 
ingot copper, but in sheet copper trade is 
fairly good. Prices are weak in London. 

Solder — There is a fair demand and 
prices are as before. We quote : Half- 
and-half at i8>£c. for guarantee, and 18c. 
for commercial. 

Iron Pipe— There has been no change 
in this market either as to business or prices. 
One-inch black is still quoted at $5.40, and 
one-inch galvanized at $7.95 per 100 ft. 

Lead — Trade continues quiet, at 4% to 
4^c. 

Spelter — Trade shows some improve- 
ment in this line and prices are unchanged, 
at 5 yi to 6c. 

Zinc Sheets — Trade is fair at dy z for 
casks, and 6^c. for part casks. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

The mid-summer quietness is here.and very 
little material is moving. Paris green is the 
leading seller at the moment, and prices are 
firm on account of the comparatively small 
stocks on hand. Linseed continues to ad- 
vance • at primary points, so" prices have 
been raised 2c. locally. Turpentine is ic. 
lower on account of a decline at Wilming- 
ton and Savannah. Other prices are 
unchanged. We quote : 

White Lead — Ex Toronto, pure white 
lead, $6.37^ ; No. 1, $6; No. 2. $5.67^ ; 



No. 3, #5.25; No. 4, ^4.87 •£ ; genuine 
dry white lead in casks, $5.37^. 

Red Lead — Genuine, in casks of 560 lb., 
$5.50; ditto, in kegs of 100 lb., $5. 75 ; No. 
1, in casks of 560 lb., #5 ; ditto kegs of 
100 lb., $5.25. 

Litharge — Genuine, 7 to 7j£c. 

Orange Mineral — Genuine, 8 to 8j£c. 

White Zinc — Genuine, French V.M., in 
casks, $7 to $7.25; Lehigh, in casks, $6. 

Paris White — 90c. to $1 per 100 lb. 

Whiting — 70c. per 100 lb. ; Gilders' 
whiting, 80c. 

Gum Shellac — In cases, 22c; in less 
than cases, 2r,c. 

Paris Green — Bbls., i6^c. ; kegs, 17c; 
50 and 100 lb. drums, i7>£c.; 25-lb. drums, 
18c. ; i-lb. papers, i8j£c. ; i-lb. tins, \^y z c.\ 
%-Va. papers, 2o^c; % -lb. tins, 2i^c. 

Putty — Bladders, in bbls., $2.10; blad- 
ders, in 100 lb. kegs, $2.25; bulk in bbls., 
$1.90 ; bulk, less than bbls. and up to 100 
lb., $2.05 ; bladders, bulk or tins, less than 
100 lb., 52.90. 

Plaster Paris — New Brunswick, $1.90 
per bbl. 

Pumice Stone — Powdered, $2.50 per 
cwt. in bbls., and 4 to 5c. per lb. in less 
quantity ; lump, ioc. in small lots, and 8c. 
in bbls. 

Liquid Paints — Pure, $1.20 to $1.30 per 
gal. 

Castor Oil — East India, in cases, 10 to 
\i>y 2 c. per lb. and 10^ to uc. for single 
tins. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 1 to 4 barrels, 84c; 
boiled, 87c; 5 to 9 barrels, raw, 81c; 
boiled, 84c, delivered. To Toronto, 
Hamilton, Guelph and London, ic. less. 

Turpentine — Single barrels, 55c; 2 
to 4 barrels, 54c, delivered. Toronto, 
Hamilton and London ic. less. For less 
quantities than barrels, 5c. per gallon extra 



40 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



will be added, and for 5 -gallon packages, 

50c, and 10 gallon packages, 80c. will be 

charged. 

GLASS. 

There is still a fairly good demand, but 
there is now practically no danger of short- 
age as stocks are coming to hand freely. 
We quote as follows : Under 26 in., $4 15 
26 to 40 in., $4.45 ; 41 to 50 in., $4.85; 
51 to 60 in., $515; 61 to 70 in., $5.50; 
double diamond, under 26 in., $6 ; 26 to 
40 in., $6.65 ; 41 to 50 in., $7.50; 51 to 
60 in., ^8.50; 61 to 70 in., $9.50, Toronto, 
Hamilton and London. Terms, 4 months 
or 3 per cent. 30 days. 

OLD MATERIAL. 

There is little doing, but prices 
are steady throughout. We quote job- 
bers' prices as follows : Agricultural scrap, 
50c. per cwt. ; machinery cast, 50c. per 
cwt. ; stove cast, 45c; No. 1 wrought 
40c. per 100 lb.; new light scrap copper, 
12c. per lb. ; bottoms, lie; heavy cop- 
per, i2^c. ; coil wire scrap, i2j£c. ; 
light brass, 7c; heavy yellow brass, 10c; 
heavy red brass, io^c. ; scrap lead, 2^c. ; 
zinc, 2C. ; scrap rubber, 6^c. ; good 
country mixed rags, 65 to 75c. ; clean dry 
bones, 40 to 50c. per 100 lb. 

COAL. 

The advance of 10c. as noted last week 
is well maintained. We quote at interna- 
tional bridges : Grate, $4.75 per gross ton ; 
egg, stove and nut, $5 per gross ton with a 
rebate of 20c. off for July shipments. 

PETROLEUM. 
There is no change. The demand is 
very light. We quote: Pratt's Astral, 
16 to i6j£c. in bulk (barrels, $1 extra) ; 
American water white, 16^ to 17c. in 
barrels; Photogene, 15^ to 16c; Sarnia 
water white, 15 to I5^c. in barrels; Sarnia 
prime white, 14 to 1454c. in barrels. 



Lake, near that town. The plant, which is 
now being ordered, is to have a capacity of 
600 bbls. per day, and will give employ- 
ment to at least 50 hands. It is expected 
that the factory will be completed in less 
than six months. 



MARKET NOTES. 

Linseed oil is 2c. per gal. dearer, 
Turpentine has declined ic. per gal. 



ANOTHER CEMENT COMPANY. 

The organization of The Sun Portland 
Cement Co., Limited, Owen Sound, Ont., 
has been practically completed. The 
authorized stock is $500,000, of which 
$200,000 is preferred stock and $300,000 
common stock. Half of the preference, 
and nearly all of the common, stock has 
been subscribed. Among the shareholders 
are F. H. Clergue and Mackenzie & Mann. 
The directors of the company are : Presi- 
dent, John Flett ; Dr. E. H. Horsey (M. P.), 
Messrs. W. P. Telford (sr.), John Harrison 
and John G. Hay. The location of the 
works will, in all probability, be at Owen 
Sound. Their marl beds ate at McNab 



OUTPUT OF WIRE RODS AND 
WIRE NAILS. 

ACCORDING to The Bulletin of the 
American Iron and Steel Associa- 
tion, the production of iron and 
steel wire rods in the United States in 1900 
amounted to 846,291 gross tons, against 
1.036,398 tons in 1899 and 1,071,683 tons 
in 1898 showing a deciease of 190,107 
tons, or over 18 percent., in 1900 as com- 
pared with 1899. Of the total production 
in 1900, 1,929 tons were iron rods and 
844, 362 tons were steel. Pennsylvania 
made the largest quantity of wire rods in 
1900, with Illinois second, Ohio third and 
Massachusetts fourth. Six other States, 
Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Ken- 
tucky, Alabama and India, also rolled wire 
rods in 1900. 

The production of steel wire nails in the 
United States in 1900 amounted to 7.233,- 
979 kegs of 100 pounds, as compared with 
7,618,130 kegs in 1899, a decrease of 
384,151 kegs, or over 5 per cent. In 1898 
the production amounted to 7,418,475 kegs, 
in 1897 to 8,997,245 kegs, in 1896 to 
4,719,860 kegs and in 1895 to 5,841,404 
kegs. The wire nails produced in 1900 
were manufactured by fifty-six works, three 
less than in 1899. The following table 
gives the production of wire nails in 1899 
and 1900 in kegs of 100 pounds : 

1899. 1900. 

Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Conn; 17i,877 212,524 

New York and New Jersey . 49,603 63,46 f 

Pennsylvania 2,91)6,211 2,U8,399 

Maryland, W. Va., Alabama and 

Ohio 2,134,823 2,516,391 

Indiana and Illinois 2,184,662 2,195,672 

Michigan, Wisconsin, Kansas 

Washington and California 146,954 87,467 

Totals 7,618,130 7,233,979 



EARLY CLOSING IN GUELPH 
The following agreement has been signed 
by most of the merchants of Guelph, Ont. . 

We, the undersigned, merchants of the City of 
Guelph, at the earnest desire of the Salesmen and 
Clerks' Association, have decided to close our 
respective place of business on Thursday of each 
week during the months of July and August at the 
hour of 12.30 p.m., provided all other similar 
places are closed, and that same shall be adver- 
tised by said Association. 

Among those who signed were the fol- 
lowing : 

Hardware. — John M. Bond & Co., G. A. 
Richardson, G. B. Morris. 

Stoves and Tinware. — Jas. Jarrett, A. Rumford, 
T. E. & S. Rudd. 

Plumbers. — Mahoney Bros. 




FANCY DECORATED LAMPS. 

A STRIKING characteristic of the in- 
dustrial development of Canada of 
late years has been the recognition 
by manufacturers and the mercantile world 
generally that in many lines, formerly 
imported, there can be produced at home 
goods fully equal in appearance, quality 
and value to the imported article. 

Gowans, Kent & Co.. Toronto, have 
done much to force recognition of this fact 
as regards fancy earthenware and glass- 
ware. Not long 
since they estab- 
lished a plant to 
manufacture cut 
glass, and have 
been eminently suc- 
cessful in compet- 
ing with foreign 
makers of this line 
of goods. 

Another line in 
which they have 
begun to compete 
with the outside 
houses is fancy 
decorated lamps. 
The only part of these which have to be 
imported are the opal globes and bottoms. 
The globes and bottoms which are brought 
in undecorated from Germany bear a duty 
of only 30 per cent, into Canada, as com- 
pared with 60 per cent, into the United 
States. As the large makers in both 
countries get their stocks from Germany, 
this gives the Canadian maker a big 
advantage at the start in buying his raw 
material. 

The plant for decorating and "firing" 
installed by Gowans, Kent & Co., is 
thoroughly up-to-date. The decorations 
are of three classes, hand painted, pattern 
printed, and the dry tint process. In all 
cases, the lamp has a "fired" or burnt in 
decoration which cannot be scraped or 
washed off. The decorations are bright 
and well finished, while the bases and brass 
connections used are now of the best 
quality and with the best gilt finish, making 
a vast improvement in the whole appearance 
of the lamps over inferior bases formerly 
used. 

The accompanying cut shows one of the 
dainty designs made by Gowans, Kent & 
Co. Further particulars can be secured 
from the catalogue which has just been 
issued, and which gives several illustrations 
of the newest shapes and designs. The 
trade is invited to visit the firm's warehouse 
and factory while in the city. 



CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

Hardware and Metal is indebted to 
James Pender & Co., St. John, N.B., for a 
copy of the handsomely illustrated booklet 
of the New Brunswick Tourist Association. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



41 



THE COST OF DOING BUSINESS. 

WE have the following communication 
in reply to one given in our issue 
of June 13. Our correspondents 
call attention, it will be observed, to the fact 
that the merchants in Nebraska did not 
allow in the cost of doing business for 
interest on the capital invested : 

" The Nebraska merchant whose letter in 
► regard to the cost of doing business was 
published in your issue of June 13 is 
evidently a good business man and does 
business on a very small expense, but we 
think he proves our assertion that many 
merchants do not figure their expenses 
sufficiently high. As we understand his 
statement, he allows 5 per cent, on the cost 
of his building for rent, which leaves very 
little for interest after repairs are made and 
taxes are paid. Ten per cent, would be a 
more reasonable allowance. 

" He does not make clear why his capital 

should not bear interest. If he had a 

partner who contributed only 10 per cent. 

of the capital, while he furnished 90 per 

cent., he would see at once that the capital 

should draw interest. If he was using 

borrowed capital he would have to pay 

interest, and when he balanced his books 

it would appear on the debtor side of profit 

and loss account. We would revise his 

figures as follows . 

5 per cent, interest on S3. 000 stock . . $150 00 

10 per cent, interest on building.... 200 00 

Freight and drayage expense 438 94 

Insurance and other expense ■ 31005 

52 weeks' salary at $1$ per week .... 780 00 

Total expense $1 ,878 99 

or a trifle over 16 per cent, of the sales, 
which were $11,706.25. 

" In estimating the profit to be added to 
the cost of the goods to cover expenses, he 
would have to add about 20 per cent, to the 
cost to equal 16 per cent, on the sales. 

" We believe there are few retail mer- 
chants in the country who can make as 
favorable a showing as this." — Iron Age. 

ROYALTIES ON COAL AND 
PETROLEUM. 

By Order-in-Council, the regulations re 
coal and petroleum lands have been 
materially altered. Since 1885 the regula- 
tions regarding coal lands were such that the 
Government in all its patents reserved to 
the Crown the right of all coal beds under- 
lying the surface. Under the late regula- 
tions, however, all coal lands are sold 
subject to the payment of a royalty on all 
coal mined. The rate of the royalty is fixed 
at ioc. a ton. This is the same royalty that 
is charged in British Columbia by the local 
Government. 

The Order- in-Council re petroleum lands 
is as follows : "The Government will give 



any person or company desiring a district in 
which to prospect, certain exclusive rights 
over a certain tract for the purpose of 
exploring and testing. The terms used to 
be $ 1 an acre for such lands, and 2% per 
cent, upon sales. That has now been 
rescinded, and after July 1 all lands in the 
Northwest Territories and the Yukon dis- 
trict will be open for prospecting. When 
oil territory is located the Government may 
grant to any person or company 604 acres 
at g 1 per acre, and the royalty to be 
charged may be fixed from time to time by 
Order in Council. Sworn statements will be 
required by the Government in regard to 
petroleum taxations, and in default the 
patents for lands may be cancelled." 

THE EDINBURGH ROPERIE & 
SAILCLOTH CO., LIMITED 

LEITH. SCOTLAND. 

Manufact urers of <*") 

Cordage of all kinds, Flax Sail- 
cloths, Tarpaulins and Water- 
Proof Cloths, Sewing Twines, 
Fishing Twines, Flshlg Lines, 
Tying Twines, Etc., Etc. 



DAVID INCUS, 



Represented by 

9 St. Peter St., 

MONTREAL 



Phone Main 4359. 



Incorporated 

1851. 



WESTERN 

H ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Fire and Marine 

Capital, subscribed $2,000,000.00 
Capital - - - 1,000,000.00 
Assets, over - - 2,340,000.00 
Annual Income - 2,290,000.00 

Head Office: TORONTO, ONT. 



Hon. Geo. A. Cox, President. J.J. Kenny, Vice-President 
C C Foster, Secretary. 



CHAMPION FIRE and 
BURGLAR-PROOF 



\ SAFES 



ESTABLISHED HERE SIXTEEN YEARS. 

We sell direct to 
the user, and save 
all com missions. 

SIXTEEN SIZES 
IN STOCK. 

Our" small Safeia 
the best low-priced 
safe in the market. 

GET PRICES, ETC. 




BEFORE BUYING. 



S. S. KIMBALL, 

577 Craig Street, - Montreal. 



CEALED TENDERS addressed to the undersigned, 
>■-* and endorsed " Tender for Iron Superstructure, 
Battleford Bridge," will be received at this office until 
Friday, July 19, inclusively, for the construction of an iron 
superstructure for the Bridge over the Battle River at 
Battleford, N.W.T., according to a plan and a spf cification 
to be seen at the offices of H. A. Gray, fesq, Resident 
Engineer, Confederation Life Building, Toronto ; Zep 1 * . 
Malhiot, Esq., Resident Enginfer, Winniptg, Man ; C 
Desjardins, Esq., Post Office, Montreal ; and on applica- 
tion to the Postmaster at Hamilton Ont , and Battleford, 
N.W.T ; also at the Department of Public Works. 
Ottawa. 

Tenders will not b • considered unless made on the form 
supplied, and signed with the actual signatures of 
tenderers. 

An accepted ch'que on a chartered bank, payable to the 
order of the Minister of Public Works, for three thousand 
dollars ($},ooo.oo), must accompany each tender. The 
cheque will be forfeited if the party decline the contract rr 
fail to complete the work contracted for, and will be 
returned in case of non-acceptance of tender. 

The Department does not bind itself to accept the 
lowest or any tender. 

By order, 

. FRED. GELINAS, 

Secretary. 
Department of Public Works, 

Ottawa, June 22, igor. 
Newspapers inserting this advertisement without au- 
thority from the Department will not be paid for it. (27) 



Will Hold Up a Shelf ! 

That's what a shelf bracket is for. 
For this purpose there can he 

NOTHING BETTER 
NOTHING CHEAPER 
than the .... 

BRADLEY STEEL ' HELP BRACKET 

It is well Japanned, Strong and Light. 

The paving in freight is a good profit, aside 
from the lower price at which the goods are sold. 
B®~ Order director through your jobber. 
ATLAS MFG. CO., New Haven, Conn.. U.S.A. 




PA,NT^ r 
PAINT d~**sb\ 




that mixes with water only and is ready for the 
brush. Wouldn't it pay yoa ? No smell, no 
dirt, no failure. 

INDELIBLO 



is the paint that does it. Comes in white and 
colors. Is washable and weatherproof. Lasts 
where others fail. It comes in dry powder. Does 
not cost much, and goes a long way. This is 
economical paint. 

AGENTS 

A. RAMSAY &. SON, MONTREAL, 

- WINNIPEG. 

- VANCOUVER 



J. H. ASHD0WN, - - - - 
McLENNAN, McFEELY & CO,, 



42 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HEATING 



AND 



PLUMBING 



SOME BUILDING NOTES. 

JH. Robinson is building a new house 
in Rossland, B.C. It is to have up- 
• to date conveniences, including a 
bathroom, electric lights, electric bells and 
Rush closet. 

Work has been begun on a new hotel at 
Wheatley, Ont. 

W. Cootes has started to erect a new 
house at Rosebank, Man. 

Plans are being prepared for a new public 
library building in London, Ont. 

R. E. North intends building a brick 
house on Louisa street, London, Ont. 

There is a possibility of a general strike 
of building trades workmen in Ottawa. 

A new Methodist church is being built by 
W. G. Hunt, contractor, at Renwick, Ont. 

Tenders were received this week by Rev. 
H. 3. Zwicker for the erection of a new 
Anglican church at Brooklyn (Hants Co.), 
N.S. 

J. R. Eaton, contractor, has been awarded 
the contract for erecting the new Methodist 
church at Midland, Ont. The cost will be 
upwards of $ 13,000. 



TORONTO BUILDING PERMITS. 

There was a rush for building permits 
during the last few days in June, causing 
the total for the month to reach $384,260 
as compared with $94,399 in June last year. 
This made the aggerate for the first six 
months, $1,154,265 in 1901, and $942,194 
in 1900. During the past week or so the 
following permits have been issued : Inde- 
pendent Order of Foresters, $40,000 addi- 
tions to their "Temple" building; the 
Toronto Litho. Co., Limited, $40,000 
factory on King street, near Spadina ; the 
North British Mercantile Co., for $10,000 
alterations to 26 Wellington street east ; to 
R. Davis for ten houses on Bright street, 
near Queen street, to cost $12,000 ; Wm. 
Harris, for a $1,000 residence on Pape 
avenue, near G.T. R. tracks ; to J. W. 
Flavelle, for a $50,000 residence on 
Hoskins avenue, Queen's Park ; to King 
Bros., for five dwellings near Dewson street, 
on Dovercourt road, to cost $10,000 ; to J. 
M. Lee for two stores and seven dwellings, 
near Gerrard, on Sumach street, to cost 
$12,000, and for two $1,100 residences on 
Sackville street, near Gerrard ; to A. Hart, 
for two $2,500 houses on Crescent road, near 
Yonge street ; to A. J. and M. Cockburn, 
for houses at 40 and 42 Delaware avenue, 



to cost $50,000 ; to A. Wills, for a $3 000 
house on Osier street, near Royce avenue ; 
to S G. Spence for a $1,600 house at 
27 Withrow avenue ; to R. T. Newton, for 
two $1,000 houses at 3i60ssington avenue ; 
to Mrs. M. W. Helliwell, for $4,000 altera- 
tions to 74 George street. 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED. 

Building permits have been issued in 
Ottawa to Henry M. Willcox, 23 McLeod 
street, dwelling, $1,200; D and H. Mc- 
Laren and Mayor Morris, 3 Sparks street, 
warehouse, $3 000 ; Mrs. Margaret Fox, 5 
Clarence street, dwelling, $3 000 ; Martin 
Lawson, 29 First avenue, dwelling, $1,500; 
Mrs. Grahlman, 15 Blackburn avenue, 
dwelling, $900 ; R. J. White, 20 First 
avenue, dwelling, $900 ; John Nicoll, 8 
Maple street, dwelling, $1,000; T. Lindsay 
& Co., 16 Victoria street, stables, $950 ; 
Aid. Geo. Dearing, 66 McLaren street, 
dwelling, $2,500 ; Robert Barnett, 4 Gil 
mour street, dwelling, $2,000 ; S. J, Davis, 
40 Hickey street, dwelling, $2 700 ; S. J. 
Davis, 38 Hickey street, dwelling, $2,800 ; 
G O. Liefert, 16 Wellington street, office, 
$250 ; Lieut. Col. A. P. Sherwood, 3 and 
4 Nicholas street, warehouses, $17,000. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING NOTES. 

Paquin & Sertorelli, plumbers, Montreal, 
have dissolved. 

The C. P. Co., Limited, manufacturers 
of electric supplies, Montreal, have applied 
for incorporation. 

Mrs. Alex. Fisher has registered as pro- 
prietress of Alex. Fisher & Co., plumbers, 
etc., Westmount, Que. 

The Cape Breton Electric Co. have 
bought out The Sydney Ferry Co. and The 
Sydney Gas and Electric Co. 

J. M. Sherlock, plumber, 72 Dundas 
street, Toronto, was prostrated by heat on 
Friday morning, and was taken to the 
Emergency Hospital, where he soon re- 
covered. 

The Dominion Radiator Co., Toronto, 
have received an order for radiators for the 
fortification building at the entrance of the 
Drontheim Fjord. This fort is the most 
northerly one in the world. They have also 
received large orders for shipment to Daw- 
son City, in the Yukon Territory. It begins 
to look as though Canadian radiators would 
be finding their way to the North Pole. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING 
CONTRACTS. 

W. Mashinter & Co., Toronto, have the 
contracts for plumbing in the Brock, Dew- 
son and Grace schools at $168. 

The contract for pumbing in the Glad- 
stone avenue, Toronto, school, has been 
awarded to J. M. Sherlock at $187. 

Purdy, Mansell & Co., Toronto, have the 
contracts for plumbing in the Borden, 
Huron and Jesse Ketchum schools at $185. 

The Bennett & Wright Co. Limited, have 
contracts for remodelling the heating of 
Col. Mason's house in Queen's Park ; for 
plumbing in two houses on Callender street 
for M. Scott, and for hot water heating in 
Paul Szelski's house on Indian road, Rose- 
dale. 



TRADE CHAT. 

The Ottawa Saw Co., Limited, have been 
incorporated. 

The Montreal Chrome Iron Co., Montreal, 
have been incorporated. 

The Wire Cable Co., Montreal, have 
been authorized to increase their capital to 
$1,000,000. 

The stock of the estate of J. J. Boese, 
general merchant, Rosthern, Man., has 
been sold to Max Wodlinger at 65c, on the 
dollar. 

About $100,000 damage was done to the 
factory of the Montreal Pipe and Foundiy 
Co., Limited, on Friday, last week. The 
loss is fully covered by insurance. 

Christie Bros., Owen Sound, Ont., have 
the contract to put a corrugated iron roof 
on the new building for The Owen Sound 
Canning Co., Limited, Owen Sound. 

The Nova Scotia Steel Co., Limited, 
Halifax, has been reorganized under the 
style of The Nova Scolia Steel and Coal 
Co., Limited, with $9,500,000 capital. The 
directors of the old company continue in 
the new. 

A. B. Ormsby & Co , Toronto, have the 
contract for tinsmithing in the Brock, Clin- 
ton, Gladstone, Dewson, Grace, Duke, 
Morse, Dovercourt, Lansdowne and York 
Street Schools, at $527. 

The Strathy Wire Fence Co., Limited, 
Owen Sound, Ont., have been reorganized, 
a new directorate being elected, composed 
of R P. Butchart, James E. Keenan, R. L. 
Strathy, A. J. Creighton and Dr. E. H. 
Horsey, M P. Considerable additional 
capital was subscribed. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



43 



CANADIAN ADVERTISING is best done by THE 
E. DESBARATS ADVERTISING AGENCY 
Montreal. 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John Street, Montreal 

Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishing to be represented in Canada. 



THE OAKVILLE 

BASKET CO., 

Manufacturers of 
i, 2, 3 Bushel 

Grain 

AND 

Root 

B askets 

THE OAKVILLE 
BASKET CO, 




The Farmer's 
Barn 
Needs 
Paint 





and we make a paint for the Farmer's Barn. 
We make paint for all classes of work. High 
grade paint for the house. Hard, quick-drying 
paint for the Floors, and then for Barns, 
Roofs, Fences Bridges, get 

RAMSAYS 
OUTSIDE PAINTS 

just what the farmer wants, not expensive, and 
yet will preserve his barn or any piece of wood 
or iron he paints as well as the highest grade 
paint made. Wonderful covering powers, 
great body, nice colors. We have color cards, 



A. Ramsay & Son 



PAINTMAKERS, 



Est'd 1842. 



MONTREAL. 



ONTARIO SILVER GO, 



Limited, 



NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA. 

„ - . , FLATWARE, CUTLERY a 

Manufacturers of ELECTRO PLATE. 

Ask for our Catalogue and Quotations. 



ONTARIO 

NUTWORK 

PARIS 

ONT. 



Ontario Nut Works, Paris 

BROWN & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

All sizes of Hot Pressed 
Nuts, Square and Hexagon. 



We have perfect confidence that if you use 



The Fairbanks 
Asbestos Disc Valve 

You will find for yourselves what we claim is true. 

These Valves are sterling products 
made of the best materials. 

Our renewable Asbestos Disc makes our valve three times 
more durable than any other. A new disc inserted means you have 
a new valve. 

Prices arid printed matter mailed. 

DROP A CARD. 




THE FAIRBANKS COMPANY, 



74.9 CRAIG STREET, 



Montreal, Que. 



44 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



TRADE IN COUNTRIES OTHER THAN OUR OWN 



A DESPATCH from Cleveland, O . 
under date of July i, says: "Another 
sharp advance was announced in 
prices for linseed oil to day by the American 
Linseed Company. The wholesale price is 
now 8oc. per gallon in single barrel lots, an 
increase of 15c. per gallon since June 1. 
The jump in prices today was 7c. per 
gallon. The increase for the last month 
has been about 25 per cent." 

IRON AND STEEL IN THE UNITED STATES. 

Bessemer pig is still freely taken, although 
there is complaint that orders are for prompt 
delivery only. In structural shapes activity 
continues, and the new plant of the 
Colorado Co. takes a large quantity. Hard- 
ware, especially for builders, is a feature, 
and an enormous fall trade is anticipated. 
Of agricultural implements and railway 
supplies there is a liberal movement. Steel 
rails are being produced at an unpre- 
cedented rate, and billets are sufficiently 
scarce to command top prices. Predictions 
that this manufacture is being overdone are 
heard less frequently, and the markets have 
settled into a regular position without efforts 
to secure easier terms. Present conditions 
are in marked contrast to the declining 
quotations and general inactivity of a year 
ago. — Dun's Review. 

NEW YORK METAL MARKETS. 

The weakness that developed in the Eng- 
lish as well as the New York market yester- 
day was, if anything, more pronounced 
to day, though it was almost wholly con- 
fined to future deliveries. Spot tin showed 
little appreciable change in this market, the 
quotation being 27.70c. bid and 28.10c. 
asked, though it could have been bought at 
28c. There seemed, however, to be little 
actual demand. In London the quotations 
on spot were iod. better than at the close 
yesterday, but there, too, the market was 
quiet. Futures, as above intimated, were 
decidedly weak and lower. Here August 
was offered at 27.50c, September at 27c, 
and October at 26.50c. In London there 
was a sharp decline in futures, the closing 
figures being £2 under those of last night. 

Copper — There was another sharp de- 
cline in the London market to-day, estab- 
lishing a new low record for the year. At 
the close the feeling was easy, with spot 
us. 3d. and futures 8s. od. under last 
night's quotations. There were no fresh 
developments in the market which was 
quoted at 17c. for Lake Superior and i6#c. 
for electrolytic and casting. 

Pig Lead — The steady tone of the market 
was maintained, though business was 



moderate, being regulated by present needs 
of consumption. St. Louis was firm under 
continued light offerings. In London there 
was a decline of is. 3d. in the price of soft 
Spanish. 

Spelter — There was no further change 
in any of the markets. Here trade was 
quiet, with prices somewhat nominal at 3.90 
to 3.95. 

Regulus Antimony — There is little doing 
in this article, but prices remain steady at 
8% to io^c, as to brand. 

Old Metals — The market is quiet, with 
prices nominal and unchanged. 

The pig iron market remains quiet, but is 
not unusually dull, considering the season. 
There is a steady tone and a general feeling 
of confidence in the future, based upon the 
indications of a continued heavy consump- 
tion of iron and steel. In England, on the 
contrary, the market is apparently depressed, 
the downward movement in prices continu- 
ing. To-day there was a decline of 4d. in 
the price of Scotch warrants in Glasgow, 
while at Middlesboro foundry iron was 3d. 
lower. 

Tinplate — There is nothing new in the 
situation, the consumption still being large, 
while prices are maintained. — New York 
Journal of Commerce, July 3. 



DEATH OF MR. THOMAS PEAKER. 

After a lingering illness Mr. Thomas 
Peaker, who was one of the smartest and 
best- known hardware salesmen in Ontario, 
passed away on Monday June 24th, at his 
home in Brampton. 

"Tom," as he was familiarly called by 
his confreres, was an exceedingly popular 
young fellow of the most genial tempera- 
ment. For several years Mr. Tom. Peaker 
did the purchasing for the firm of Peaker 
& Son, of Brampton. If he could not give 
all travellers an order, he received them all 
most cordially, and very many commercial 
gentlemen will remember his sincere wel- 
come. 

Hardware and Metal ventures to join 
in the warm sympathy which has been 
conveyed to Mrs. Thomas Peaker, Mr. 
Peaker, senior, and the sorrowing family 
generally, from all parts of Canada. 



EARLY CLOSING IN SYDNEY. 

There is a disposition to extend early 
closing in Sydney, N.S. At present the 
stores close at 6 p.m. only on Wednesday 
evening, but, according to a score of inter- 
views published last week by the Sydney 
Post, it is clear that the general desire is to 
close at that hour at least two or three 
evenings a week. 



A 

SUCCESSFUL 

SEASON. 



The end of June is usually considered 
to be the close of the Spring trade in the 
Paint, Oil and Varnish business, but this 
year is exceptional, as we are as busy now 
as we were in the month of May. 

The three months just closed have 
seen the record of all previous years com- 
pletely eclipsed, and we must acknowledge 
that our success has been very largely 
due to the unflinching loyalty of our cus- 
tomers throughout the country. While 
we make this acknowledgement most 
frankly, we are not altogether so modest 
as to abstain from attributing a fair share 
of the increased business to the merits of 
the well-known brands which we manu- 
facture. We claim that our manufactures, 
from one end of our catalogue to the 
other, are sound, honest goods, not sur- 
passed anywhere in the world, and this 
fact, coupled with the loyalty of our 
friends, is a combination which makes 
for success. 

We are very busy, but not too busy to 
give as much attention as ever to main- 
tenance of quality in every line we turn 
out, and our customers may therefore 
rest assured that everything they handle 
from our factories will do them credit. 



THE 



CANADA 

PAINT 

COMPANY, 



LIMITED, 

Montreal, July 6th, 1901. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



45 




46 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MANITOBA MARKETS. 

Winnipeg, July 3, 1901. 

HARDWARE AND PAINTS, OILS 
AND GLASS. 

THE week has been fine with the 
exception of a very heavy rainstorm 
Tuesday evening. The storm broke 
about 8 p.m. and lasted until 3 a.m. 
Wednesday, and during that time more rain 
fell than even the "oldest inhabitant" re- 
members falling in a like period of time; in 
fact, for a time it was such a deluge that the 
city sewers could not carry it away, and it 
was backed up on some of the basements to 
a depth of two feet and on the streets to a 
depth of several inches. Although the 
storm covered a large section of the Province 
and was accompanied by severe thunder 
and lightning, with slight downfall of hail in 
some parts, no reports of serious damage 
have come to hand, and the crop prospects 
still continue all that could be desired. 

Trade has been excellent all the week, 
and more than one wholesale house is ex- 
pressing surprise at the amount of money 
coming in, and state that paper is being 
well met at the banks. This increase in 
the circulation of money is due to the good 
price realized by farmers for their stockers, 
the cash being paid by creameries to the 
farmers, and the general activity in all lines 
of farm produce. 

Business is good in all lines of general 
hardware, and cut nails have advanced 10c. 
This is the only change noted. 

Quotations for the week are as follows : 

Barbed wire, 100 lb S3 45 

Plain twist 3 45 

Staples 3 95 

Oiled annealed wire 10 3 95 

" 11 4 00 

12 4 05 

" 13 4 20 

14 4 35 

15 * 45 
Wire nails, 30 to 60 dy, keg 3 5° 

16 and 20 3 60 

10 3 60 

8 3 7° 

6 3 75 

4 3 9° 

3 4 15 

Cut nails, 30to6ody 3 10 

" 20 to 40 3 15 

" 10 to 16 320 

8 325 

6 3 30 

4 3 4° 

3 3 75 

Horsenails, 45 percent, discount. 

Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No 1 4 65 

No. 2 and larger 4 4° 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 490 

No. 2 and larger 4 4° 

Steel, No. o to No. 1 495 

No. 2 and larger 4 7° 

Bar iron, $2.50 basis. 
Swedish iron, $5.00 basis. 

Sleigh shoe steel 3 00 

Spring steel 3 25 

Machinery steel 375 

Tool steel, Black Diamond, 100 lb 8 50 

Jessop 13 00 

Sheet iron, black, 10 to 20 gauge, 100 lb. 3 50 

20 to 26 gauge 3 75 

28 gauge 4 00 

Galvanized American, 16 gauge. . . 2 54 

18 to 22 gauge 4 5° 

24 gauge 4 75 

26 gauge 5 00 

28gauge 5 25 



Genuine Russian, lb 12 

Imitation " " 8 

Tinned, 24 gauge, 100 lb 7 75 

26 gauge 8 00 

28 gauge 8 50 

Tinplate, IC charcoal, 20 x 28, box 10 75 

IX " 1275 

IXX " 1475 

Ingot tin 33 

Canadaplate, 18 x 21 and 18 x 24 3 25 

Sheet zinc, cask lots, 100 lb 7 50 

Broken lots 8 00 

Pig lead, 100 lb 6 00 

Wrought pipe, black up to 2 inch.... 50 an 10 p.c. 

Over 2 inch 50 p.c. 

Rope, sisal, 7-16 and larger $11 00 

H 11 50 

" Y* and 5-16 1200 

Manila, 7-16 and larger 14 00 

# 14 5° 

" Yt and 5-16 1500 

Solder 20 

Cotton Rope, all sizes, lb 17 

Axes, chopping $ 7 50 to 12 00 

" double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 

Screws, flat head, iron, bright 87 K 

Round" " 82% 

Flat ' ' brass 80 

Round " " 75 

Coach 57 K p.c. 

Bolts, carriage 55 p.c. 

Machine 55 p.c. 

Tire 60 p.c 

Sleigh shoe 65 p.c. 

Plough 40 p.c. 

Rivets, iron 50 p.c. 

Copper, No. 8 35 

Spades and shovels 40 p.c. 

Harvest tools 50, and 10 p.c. 

Axe handles, turned, s. g. hickory, doz. . $2 50 

No. 1 1 50 

No. 2 1 25 

Octagon extra 1 75 

No. 1 1 25 

Files common 70, and 10 p.c. 

Diamond 60 

Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 50 p.c. 

Dominion, OF., pistol 30 p.c. 

military 15 p.c. 

American R.F 30 p.c. 

C.F. pistol 5 p.c. 

OF. military 10 p.c. advance. 

Loaded shells : 

Eley's soft, 12 gauge black 16 50 



chilled, 12 guage. 

soft, 10 guage 

chilled, 10 guage , 
Shot, Ordinary, per 100 lb ... . 

Chilled 

Powder, F.F., keg 

F.F.G 



18 00 

21 00 

23 00 

6 25 

6 75 

4 75 

5 00 



Tinware, pressed, retinned 75 and 2% p.c. 

" plain 70 and 15 p.c. 

Graniteware, according to quality 50 p.c. 

PETROLEUM. 

Water white American 25 He 

Prime white American 24c. 

Water white Canadian 22c. 

Prime white Canadian 21c • 

PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS 

Turpentine, pure, in barrels $ 61 

Less than barrel lots 66 

Linseed oil, raw 92 

Boiled 95 

Lubricating oils, Eldorado castor 25 % 

Eldorado engine 24^ 

Atlantic red 27^ 

Renown engine 41 

Black oil 23 l A to 25 

Cylinder oil (according to grade) . . 55 to 74 

Harness oil 61 

Neatsfoot oil $ 1 00 

Steam refined oil 85 

Sperm oil 1 50 

Castor oil per lb. 11 A 

Glass, single glass, first break, 16 to 25 

united inches 2 25 

26 to 40 per 50 ft. 2 50 

41 t° 5° "100 ft. 550 

51 to 60 " " " 600 

61 to 70 per 100-ft. boxes 6 50 

Putty, in bladders, barrel lots per lb. 2% 

kegs " 2% 

White lead, pure per cwt. 7 00 

No 1 6 75 

Prepared paints, pure liquid colors, ac- 
cording to shade and color, per gal. $1.30 to $1.90 

NOTES. 

Mr. Wm. S. Leslie, of A. C. Leslie & Co., 
iron and steel works, Montreal, was in the 
city last week on his way to the Coast. 

The implement trade is active, especially 
in the matter of ploughs for fall. The 
delivery of binders, mowers and rakes will 
be very large. 



American Sheet Steel Company 

Battery Park Building 
New York 

Manufacturers of all varieties of 

Iron and Steel Sheets 
Black and Galvanized 
Plain and Painted 
Flat, Corrugated and 
"V" Crimped 

Apollo Best Bloom Galvanized 
W. Dewees Wood Company's 

Patent Planished Iron 
W. Dewees Wood Company's 

Refined Smooth Sheets 
Wellsville Polished Steel Sheets 



Representatives for Canada 
B. & S. H. Thompson & Company 
26 St. Sulpice Street 
Montreal 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



47 



PORTLAND 
CEMENTS 

Best German, Belgian and 
English Brands. 

^ire Bricks, Fire Clay, 
^lue Linings, 

Drain Pipes, 

Calcined Plaster, 

Granite Hard Wall Plaster, 

Wheelbarrows, 

Mortar Stains. 

A full stock of Builders' and Contractors' 
Supplies. Write for Quotations. 



W. HcNally & Co., 

MONTREAL. 

DAVID PHILIP 

MANUFACTURERS' AGENT 

362M Main St., - WINNIPEG. 

Correspondence invited from manufacture! s of Staple or 
Heavy Hardware, Iron or Steel Bolts and Nuts, etc., 
ei'her by carrying stocjf in Winnipeg or by selling direct 
from factory. 

GOOD REFERENCES. 



STOVE PIPE THIMBLE. 




This is our Improved 
Fire Proof, Asbestos- 
Lined, Stovepipe 
Thimble, for floors 
which extend from 8 to 
16 inches; also showing 
Register placed in 
thimble after removing 
pipe, for covering up 
hole or ventilating 
room, opened or closed 
as desired. Write us 
for catalogue showing 
full line of these goods 
and our other hardware 
specialties. 



THE COLLINS MFG. CO., 



34 Adelaide Street West 



TORONTO 



The Robin Hood 
Powder Company 

If you want the best Trap or Game load in 
the world, buy " Robin Hood Smokeless," 
in " Robin Hood" Shells. It is quick, safe, 
and reliable. Try it for pattern and pene- 
tration from forty to seventy yards against 
any powder on the market. We make the 
powder, we make the shells, and we load 
them. Write for our booklet, " Powder 
Facts." 

The Robin Hood Powder f , 
Company — 

S WANTON, VT.4 

«r 



Special list of low-priced Japanned? 
and Regalvanized Wire Cloth. '.. ■ 



u 

24, 30, 36 in. wire, in 50 ft. rdfls. 



SAMPLES SENT WHEN DESIRED. WRITE FOR PRICES. 



J 



The B. GREENING WIRE CO., Limited 



Hamilton, Ont., and Montreal, Que. 



® 

m 
| 
m 
m 
| 
m 

£ 

i 

5 
® 
£ 
m 




per doz. 

No. 17, Japanned $9.00 

No. 18, 8®» Tinned =g« 10.00 



"Enterprise" Cherry %S toners 

^ 'Pre Nos. 17 arid 18 are constructed with a patented 

Regulating Device the simplicity of which makes it 
easier to adjust the machine for the different sizes of 

Cherries arid absolutely insure./ - the jaws retaining 

their position when set. 

*Pre No. 12 is intended to remove the 
./•tones with the least possible cutting or 
disfiguring of the Fruit. 



Fruit, Wine & Jelly Press 



All the Leading Jobbery 

of the Dominion 

SELL THEM 




ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 
MAILED FREE 



The Enterprise Mfg. Co. of Pa. 

Philadelphia. Pis. U. S. A. 



No. 34, $3.00 




i 



Li* 



r 

t 



No. 33. 
No. 34. 



CZc£cZcZcZcZCZcZcZcZc£cZC?.CZC;.C;C!CJ.C! 



48 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




ost perfect Lath in the market. 



Adopted in Great Britain, United States and in Canada 
for all Government Buildings. 



Expanded Metal & 
Fireproofing Co., Limited 

98 and 100 King St. West, 

TORONTO. 






CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



49 



it 



55 



MIDLAND 

BRAND 

Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as fuel, "Mid- 
land' ' will rival in quality and grading the 
^ very best of the imported brands. 



Writs for Prices to Sales Agents: 

Drummond, McCall & Co. 

MONTREAL, QUE. 



or to 



Canada Iron Furnace Co. 



MIDLAND, ONT. 



Limited 



"The Peerless 



5 J is the best Bolster Spring ever 
produced. A fine line for the 

„ hardware trade. Wr ite Us For Prices, 




James Warnock & Co. 



Gait, Ont. 



CUKRE^T MARKET QUOTATIONS, 



July 5, 1901. 
These prices are for such qualities and 
quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 

Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list as the desire 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

Tin. 

Lamb and Flag and Straits— 

56and281b. ingots, per lb. 31% 32 
Tinplates. 

Charcoal Plates— Bright 

M.L.S., equal to Bradley. Pi r boi 

I.O., usual sizes $6 50 

I.X., " 8 00 

I.X.X., " 9 50 

Famous— 

1.0 6 50 

I.X 8 00 

I.X.X 9 50 

Raven k Vulture Grades— 

I.O., usual sizes 4 50 

I.X., " 5 25 

I.X.X " 6 00 

l.XXX., " 6 75 

D.C., 12%xl7 4 00 

D.X 4 75 

D.X.X 5 00 

Coke Plates— Bright 

Bessemer Steel — 

I.O. , usual sizes 3 75 

I.O., special sizes, base 4 Ou 

20x28 7 75 

Charcoal Plates— Terns 

Dean or J. G. Grade— 

I.C., 20i28, 112 sheets 8 00 

I.X.,TemeTin 10(0 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 

1 ookley Grade— Per lb. 

X X.,14x56,508heetbxs~) 

" 14x60, " > .... 0(6% 

•' 14x65, " ) 

Tinned Sheets 

7Jx30upto24gauge 17% 

'■ 26 " 08 

" 28 " 08% 

Iron and Steel. 

Common Bar, per 100 lbs.... 185 190 

Re6ned " " 2 35 

Horse Shoe Iron ' 2 35 

Hoop steel, 1% to 3 in. base, 

extras for smaller sizes 3 00 

Sleigh Shoe Steel " base — 2 10 

Tire Steel 2 31 2 50 

Reeled Machinery 3 00 

ToeCalkSteel 2 85 3 00 

T Firth fcCo's tool steel.per lb 12% 13 

Jessop's tool Steel 12% 13 

Morton's tool Fteel C 12y, 13 

Black Diamond and " B C," 

tool stell 10 11 

Diill Steel, per lb 0(8 10 

Boiler Tnbes. 

1%-inch 12% 

2 " 13 

2% " 015 

3 " 16 

, 3% " 20 

4 " 25 

Steel Boiler Plate. 

% inoh 2 50 2 60 

3-16mch 2 60 2 70 

«4 inch and thicker 2 50 2 60 

Black Sheets. 

Com. D.F1. 

18gauge 2 75 3 00 

20 gauge 2 75 3 CO 

22 to 24 " 2 75 3 25 

26 " 2 ?5 

28 " 3 00 3 50 



Canada Plate*. 

All dull, 52 sheets 2 90 

Half polished 3 00 

Allbright 3 !0 

Iron Pipe. 
Black pipe— 

% '• 4 65 

% inch 3 40 

% •' 3 45 

% " 3 70 

% " 385 

1 " 5 40 

1% " 7 35 

1% " 8 80 

2 " 11 80 

2% " 22 00 

3 " 2 80 

3% " 32 30 

4 " 40 95 

5 " 49 70 

6 " 65 20 

Galvanized pipe — 

V, iDch 5 15 

y 4 " 5 50 

1 " 7 95 

1% " 10 80 

1% " 12 95 

2 " 17 35 

Galvanized Sheets. 

Queen's 
G C. Comet. Amer. Head. 
16 gauge ... 4 00 3 75 

18 to 24 gauge 4 00 3 85 4 25 4 00 
26 " 4 25 4 10 4 25 4 25 

28 " 4 50 4 35 4 40 4 50 

Case lots 10 to 15o. less. 

28 gauge American equals 26 gauge English. 
Chain. 

Proof Coil, 3-16 in., per 1001b 

% " 8 90 8 50 

5-16 " " 4 70 5 00 

% " " 4 05 4 CO 

7-16 " " 3 91 4 /5 

% " " 3 '/0 4 10 

9-16 " " 3 65 4(5 

% " " 3 35 3 90 

•• % •• " 3 60 4 (0 

Halter, kennel and post chains, 40 to 40 and 

5 p.c. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Tie-out chains 65 p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 45 p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, die- 
count 35 p c. 
Jack chain, brass, single and double, die- 
count 40 p.c. 

Copper. 
Ingot 

English B.S., ton lots 17% 

Lake Superior 

Bais. 
Cut lengths round, % to % in. 23 25 
" round and square 

1 to 2 inches.... 23 25 
Sheet. 
Plain, 14 oz., and light, 16 

oz. , 14x48 and 14x60 21 £4% 

Plain, 14 oz., and light, 16 

oz., irregular sizes 24% 25 

Tinned copper sheets 26 

Planished 32 

BrazierB (In sheets.) 

4x6ft. 25 to 30 lbs. ea., per lb 25 

" 35 to 45 " " .... 24 

" 50-lb. and above, " .... 23 

Boiler and T.K.Pitts 

Plain Tinned, per lb 28 

Spun, per lb 32 

BlBWi 
Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge, 15 per cent. 

Sheets, hard-rolled, 2i4 13 

Tubing, base, per t 23 

Zinc Spelter 

Foreign.perlb 05% 06 

Domest-io " 



Zinc Sheet. 

5 cwt. casks 00 6% 

Partcasks CO 6% 

Lead. 

Imported Pig, per lb 04V. C4% 

Bar.llb 05% 05% 

Sheets, 2% lbs. sq. ft., by .... C6|4 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lbs., " .... 06 

Note.— Cut sheets % cent per lb. extra. 
Pipe, by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists 
at 7c. per lb. and 30 p.c. dis. f.o.b. Toronto. 

Note.— Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 
8-ft. lengths lists at 7% cents. 

Shot. 

Common, $6.50 per 1C0 lb. ; chilled, $7.00 
per 100 lb. ; buck, seal and ball, $7.50. Dis- 
count, 17% p.c. Prices are f.o.b. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Terms 3 per cent, cash, freights equalized. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings. 
Discount, 60 and 10 per cent, on medium and 
extra heavy, and 60 per cent, on light. 

Solder. Per lb. Per lb. 
Bar half-and-half, guarant'd .... 18% 
Bar half-and-half, commer'l .... 18 

Refined 17% 

Wiping 17 

Note.— Prices of this graded according to 
quantity. The prices of other qualities of 
solder in the market indicated by private 
brands vary according to composition. 

Antimony. 

Cookson's, per lb 10% 11 

White Lead. Per 100 lb. 

Pure 6 37 

No. 1 do 6 00 

No.2do 5 62% 

No.3do 5 55 

No.4do 4 87% 

Munro's Select Flake White 7 37% 

Elephant and Decorators' Pure 7 12% 

BrandramsB B. Genuine 8 00 

11 " Decorative 7 55 

'• " No. 1 6 85 

" " No. 2 6 00 

Bed Lead. 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt $5 50 

Genuine, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 5 75 

No. 1, 560 lb. casks, per cwt 5 25 

No. 1, lUOlb. kfgs, per cwt 5 00 

White Zinc Paint. 

Elephant Snow White 08 09 

Pure White Zinc... -. 08 0(9 

No. 1 06 07% 

No. 2 05 C6% 

Dry White Lead. 

Pure, casks 5 75 

Pure, kegs 6 25 

No. l.casks 5 50 

No. 1, kegs 5 00 

Prepared Paints. 

In %i % and 1 gallon tins. 

Pure, per gallon 125 

Second qualities, per gallon 1)0 

Barn (inbbls.) 75 85 

The Sherwin-Williams Paints 1 45 

Canada Paint-Co's Pure 125 

Toronto Lead & Ci.lor Cos Pure 1 25 

Sanderson Pearcy's Pure 1 20 

Stewart & Wood's Champion Pure. 1 20 

Colors in Oil. 

25 lb. tins, Standard Quality. 

Venetian Red, per lb 05 

Chrome Yellow 11 

Golden Ochre 06 

French " 05 

Marine Black 09 

Green 09 

Chrome " 08 

French Imperia Green 09 



Colors, Dry. 

Yellow Ochre (J.C.) bbls.... 135 140 

Yellow Ochre J.F.L.S.), bbls ... 2 75 

Yellow Ochre (Royal) 1 10 1 15 

Brussels Ochre 2 00 

Venetian Red (best), per cwt. 180 190 

English Oxides, per cwt 3 00 3 25 

American Oxides, per cwt. . 1 75 2 00 

Canadian Oxides, per cwt.,.. 175 2 00 

Super MagnetioOxides, 93p.o. 2 00 2 25 

Burnt Sienna, pure, per lb 10 

" Umber, " " o 10 

do Raw 09 

Drop Black, pure 09 

Chrome Yellows, pure 18 

Chrome Greens, pure, per lb 12 

Golden Ocbre .... 03 3 / 4 

Ultramarine Blue in 28-1 b.. 

boxes, per lb 08 24 

Kire Proof Mineral, per 100 lb . . ., 1 00 

Genuine Eng.Litharge, per lb .... 07 

Mortar Color, per 100 lb 125 

English Vermillion 80 

Pure Indian Red, No. 45 lb 80 

Whiting, per 100 lb 55 

Bine Stone. 

Casks, for spraying, per b 07 

100-lb. lots, do. per lb 08 

Putty. 

Bulk in bbls 1 93 

Bulk in less quantity 2 05 

Bladders in bbls 2 10 

Bladders in kegs, boxes or loose. ... 2 25 

Bladders in 25-lb. tins 2 35 

Bladders in 12%-lb. tins 2 65 

bladders in tu k or tins less than 1001b2 90 

Varnishes. 

In 5-gal. lots.). Per gal. 

Carriage, No. 1 2 90 3 30 

" body 8 00 9 00 

" rubbing 4 00 5 00 

Gold Size, Japan 3 00 3 40 

Brown Japan 2 40 2 80 

Elastic Oak 2 90 3 30 

Furniture, extra 2 40 2 80 

No. 1 160 2 00 

Hard Oil Finish 2 70 3 10 

Light Oil Finish 3 20 3 60 

Demar 3 3J 3 70 

Shellac, white 4 40 4 80 

" orange 4 00 4 40 

Furniture Brown Japan 1 60 2 00 

Black Japan 2 40 2 80 

u No. 1 1 60 2 00 

The Imperial Varnish & Color Co's., 
Limited Elastilite Varnish 1 gal. can, each. 
$3.00. 

Granatine Floor Finish per gal., $2.75. 

Maple Leaf Coach Enamels ; Size 1, $1 2) ; 
Size 2, 7Uc. ; Size 3, 4 jc. each. 

Castor OH. 

East India, in cases, per lb. .0 10 10% 

" " small lots 10% 11 

Cod Oil, Etc. 

Cod Oil per gal .. 50 55 



Pure Olive. 
" Neatsfoot. 



1 20 
90 



Glne. 

Cjmmon 03% 09 

French Medal 14 14% 

Cabinet sheet 12 13 

White.extra 18 20 

Gelatine 22 30 

Strip 18 20 

Coopers 19 20 

Huttner 0)8 



50 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THOS. GOLDSWORTHY & SONS 

MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

Cloth 
Corn 

Flour 



EMERY I 



We carry all numbers of Corn and Flour Emery in io-pound packages, from 8 to 140, 
in stock. Emery Cloth, Nos. OO., O., F., FF., 1 to 3. 

JAMES HUTTON & CO., Wholesale Agents for Canada, Montreal. 



HARDWARE. 

Amni anltimi. 
Cartridges. 

B. B Cap Dom. 50 and 5 ptr cant. 

Rim Fire Pistol, dis. 40 p. c, Amer. 

Rim Fire Cartridges, Dom., 50 and 5 p. o. 

Central Fire Pistol and Rifle, 10 p. o. Amer. 

Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes, Dom. 
30 per cent. 

Central Fire Oartr dges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dom., 15 and 5 per cent. 

Central Fire. Military and Sporting, Amer. 
add 5 p.c. to list. B.B. Caps, discount 40 
per cent. Amer. 

Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap" and 
" Dominion " grades, 25 per cent. Rival 
and Nitro, net list. 

Brass Shot Shells, 55 per cent. 

Primers, Dom., 30 per cent. 

Wads per lb. 

Best thick white felt wadding, in %-lb 

bags 1 00 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

%-lb. bags 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each,12 and smaller gauges 99 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 35 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 5^0 each, 8 gauge 55 

Thin card wads, in boxes of l,0u0 

each, 12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge 25 

Thin card wads in boxes of 1,000 
each, 8 gauge 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M. 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and It gauges 70 

7and8gauges 90 

5 and 6 gauges 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 gauges 1 65 

5 and 6 gauges 1 90 

Adzes. 

Discount, 20 per cent. 

Anvils. 

Wright's, 80-ll>. and over lt-"/ 4 

Hay Budden, 80-lb. and over .... 09Vi 

Brooks, .... 11% 

Angers. 

Gilmour's, discount 65 and 5 p.c. off list. 

Axes. 
Chopping Axes 

Single bit, per doz 5 50 10 00 

Double bit, " 1100 18 00 

Bench Axes, 40 p.c. 
Broad Axes, 33% per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boy's Axes 5 75 6 75 

Splitting Axes 6 50 12 00 

Handled Axes 7 00 10 00 

Axle Grease. 

Ordinary, per gross 5 75 6 00 

Bestquality 13 00 15 00 

Bath Tubs. 

Zinc 6 00 

Copper, discount 15 p.c. off revised list 

Baths. 

Standard Enameled. 

5%-inch rolled rim, 1st quality 25 00 

2nd ' 21 00 

Anti-Friction Metal. 

"Tandem" A per lb. 27 

B " 21 

C " 11% 

Magnolia Anti-Friction Metal, per lb. 25 
Frictionless metal, per lb 23 

SYRACUSE SMELTING WORKS. 

Aluminum, genuine 45 

Dynamo 29 

Special 25 

Aluminum, 99 p.c. pure "Syracuse ". . 50 

Bells. 

Hand. 
Brass, 60 per cent. 
Mckel, 55 per cent. 



Cow. 
American make, discount 68% per oent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 
Door. 

Gongs, Sargant's 5 50 8 00 

" Peterboro', discount 45 per cent. 
Farm. 

American, each 125 3 00 

House. 

American, per lb 35 40 

Bellows. 

Hand, per doz 3 35 4 75 

Moulders', per doz 7 50 10 00 

Blacksmiths', discount 40 per cent. 

Belting. 
Extra, 60 per cent. 
Standard, 60 and 10 per cent. 
Bits. 
Auger. 
Gilmour's, discount 60 and 5 per cent. 
Rockford, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings' Gen., net list. 
Car. 
Gilmour's, 47% to 50 per cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Damond, Shell, per doz 100 150 

Nail and Spike, per frross . . . . 2 25 5 20 
Blind and Bed Staples. 

All sizes, per lb 07 5 4 12 

Bolt* and Nuts. Percent. 

Carriage Bolts, full square, Norway 65 

'• " full square 63 

Common Carriage Bolts, all sizes 60 

Machine Bolts, all sizes 60 

Coach Screws 70 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 72% 

Blank Bolts 60 

Bolt Ends 62% 

Plough Bolts 60 

Nuts, square 4 c. off 

Nuts, hexagon 4 I /ic off 

Tire Bolts 67% 

Stove Bolts 67% 

Stove rods, per lb 5% to 6o. 

Boot Calks. 

Small and medium, ball, per M 4 25 

Small heel, per M 4 50 

Bright Wire Goods. 

Discount 6 .% per cent. 

Broilers . 
Light, dis., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Reversible, dis., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Vegetable, per doz., dis. 37% per cent. 

Henis, No. 8 , " 6 00 

Henis, No. 9, " 7 00 

Queen City " 7 50 00 

Butchers' Cleavers. 

German, per doz 6 00 11 00 

Amerioan, per doz 12 00 20 00 

Building Paper, Etc. 

Plain building, per roll 30 

Tarred lining, per roll 40 

Tarred roofing, per loo lb 165 

Coal Tar, per barrel 3 50 

Pitch, per 100-lb 85 

Carpet felt, per ton 45 iO 

Bull Rings. 
Copper, $2.00 for 2% in. and $1.90 for 2 in. 

Butts. 
Wrought Brass, net revised ist 

Cast Iron. 
Loose Pin, dis. , 6u per cent. 

Wrought Steel. 
Fast Joint, dis. 65, 10 and 2% per cent. 
Loose Pin, dis. 65, 10 and 2% per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, dis. 70, 70 and 5 per c ut. 

Gen. Bronzed, per pair 40 65 

Carpel Stretchers . 

American, per doz 100 150 

Bullard's, per doz 6 50 .... 

Castors. 
Bed, new list, dis. 55 to 57% percent. 
Plate, dis. 52% to 57% per cent. 
Cattle Leaders. 

Nos. 31 and 32, per gross 50 9 50 

Cement. 

Canadian Portland 2 50 2 80 

Euglish " 3 00 

Belgian " 2 60 2 75 

Canadian hydraulic 125 150 



Chalk. 

Carpenters Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump, per cwt 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon, per gross 14 18 

Chisels. 
Socket, Framiug and Firmer. 
Broad's, dis. 70 per cent. 
Warnock's, dis. 70 per cent. 
P. S. & W. Extra 60, 10 and 5 p.c. 

Churns. 
Revolving Churns, metal frames— No. 0, $8— 
No. 1, 88.50— >o, 2, $9.00— No. 3, $10.00— 
No. 4, $12.00— No. 5, $16.00 each. Ditto, 
wood frames— 20c. each less than above. 
Discounts : Delivered from factories, 58 
p.c. ; from slock in Montreal, 58 p.c. 
Terms, 1 months or 3 p.c. cash in 30 days. 
Clips. 
Axle dis. 65 per cent. 

Closets 

Plain Ontario Syphon Jet $16 00 

Emb. Ontario Syphon Jet 17 00 

Fittings nes 1 00 

Plain Teutonic Syphon Washout 10 00 

Emb. Teutonic Syphon Washout. ... 11 00 

Fittings net 1 25 

Low Down Teutonic plain 16 CO 

" " " embossed 17 00 

Plain Richelieu net 3 75 

Emb. Richelieu net 4 00 

Fittings net 1 25 

Liw Dowu Out. Sy. Jet, plain net. . 19 50 
" " " •' " emb'd. net 20 50 

Closet connection net I 25 

Basins, round, 14 in 1 00 

" oval, 17 x 14 in 2 51 

" " 19x15 in 3 75 

Discount 40 p.c, except on net figures. 
Compasses, Dividers, Ktc. 
American, dis. 62V4 to 65 per cent. 

Cradles, Grain. 
Canadian, dis. 25 to 33% per cent. 
Crosscut Saw Handles. 

S. &, D., No. 3, per pair 17% 

" " 5, " 22% 

" 6, " 15 

Boynton pattern " 20 

Door Springs. 

Torrey's Rod, per doz (15 p.c.) 2 00 

Coil, per doz 88 1 60 

English, per doz 2 00 4 00 

Draw Knives. 
Coach and Wagon, dis. 50 and 10 per cent. 
Carpenters, dis. 70 per cent. 
Drills. 
Hand and Breast. 
Millar's Falls, per doz. net list. 
DRILL BITS. 
Morse, dis., 37% to 40 per cent. 
Standard dis. 50 and 5 to 55 per cent 

Faucets . 
Common, cork-lined, dis. 35 per cent. 
ELBOWS. (Stovepipe.) 

No. 1, per doz 1 40 

No. 2, per doz 1 20 

Bright, 20c. per doz. extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 
Discount, 45 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 
Iron, discount 40 per cent. 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 
Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 
FILES AND RASPS. 

Great Western 75 and 5 ptr cent. 

Disston 70 " 10 

Arcade 75 " 5 " 

Kearney 4 Foot 70 " 10 

American 75 " 5 '' 

McCiellan 70 " 5 

Eagle 70 10 and 5 " 

Nicholson 70 " 10 

Heller 60 " 10 

Royal & Keystone 80 p.c. and 80 and 10 p c. 
Black Diamond, 60 to 6j and 10 per cent. 
Jowitt's, English list, 25 to 27% per cent. 

FORKS. 
Hay, manure, etc. , dis., 50 and 10 per cent, 
revised list. 

GLASS— Window— Box Price. 

Star D. Diamond 

Size United Per Per Per Per 

Inches. 50 ft. 100 ft 50 ft. 100 ft 

Under 26 2 15 4 15 .... 6 CO 

26to40 2 30 4 45 .... 6 65 



41 to 50 


4 85 


' 5 o° 

8 5°, 

9 5°, 
10 5" 
1172 

14 o" 

15 5" 
18 0" 


51 to 60 


5 15 


61 to 70 


5,50 


71 to 80 


6 00 


81 to 85 


6 50 


86 to 90 




91 to 95 




99 to 100..... 





GAUGES 

Marking, Mortise, Etc. 
Stanley's dis. 50 to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 
Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33, each. . . 1 65 2 40 
HALTERS. 

Rope, % per gross 

" % " 9 00 

" %to% 14 00 

Leather, 1 in., per doz 3 87% 4 00 

" l%in., " 5 15 5 20 

Web, —per doz 187 2 45 

HAMMERS. 
Nail 
Maydole's, dis. 5 to 10 per cent. Can. dis. 
25 to 27% per cent. 

Tack. 

Magnetic, per doz 1 10 1 20 

Sledge. 

Canadian, per lb ... 07% 0i% 

Ball Pean. 

English and Can., perlb.... 22 25 

HANDLES. 

Axe, per doz. net 150 2 00 

Store door, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Fork. 
O. k B., dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 

Hoe. 
C. & li , dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 
Saw. 

American, per doz 1 00 1 25 

Plane. 

American, per gross 3 15 3 76 

Hammer and Hatchet. 
Canadian, 40 percent. 

Oross-Cut Saws. 
Canadian, per pair 13% 

HANGERS. doz. pain. 

Steel barn door 5 85 6 00 

Stearns, 4 inch 5 00 

" 5 inch 6 50 

Lane's covered — 

No. 11, 5-ft.run 8 40 

No. 11%, 10-ft.run 10 80 

No. 12, 10-ft.run 12 60 

No. 14, 15-ft. run 2100 

Lane's O.N.T. track, per foot. ... 4% 

HARVEST TOOL8. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 
HATCHETS. 
Canadian, dis. 40 to 42% per cent. 

HINGES. 
Blind, Parker's, dis. 50 and 10 to 60 per cent. 

Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb 06% 

" " 5-in., " 06'/i 

" " 6-in., " 06 

" " 8-in., " .... 05% 

" 10-in., " .... 05% 
Light T and strap, dis. 65 and 5 per cent. 
Screw hook and hinge — 

6 to 10 in., per 100 lbs 3 90 

12 in. up, per 100 lbs 3 00 

Per gro. pairs. 

Spring 12 00 

HOES. 
Garden, Mortar, etc., dis. 50 and 10 p.c. 

Planter, per doz 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE 

Disoount 45 and 5 per cent. 

HOOKS. 
Cast Iron. 

Bird Cage, per doz 50 110 

Clothes Line, per doz 27 63 

Harness, per doz 72 88 

Hat and Coat, per gross 1 00 3 00 

Chandelier, per doz 50 100 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought Hooks and Staples, Can., dis. 
47% per cent. 

Wire. 
Hat and Coat, discount 45 per cent. 

Belt, per 1,000 60 

Screw, bright, dis. 55 per cent. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



51 



' 



ATTENTION, PLUMBERS. 

GALVANIZED IRON VENTILATION PIPE— In 6, 8 and 10-foot lengths, with no cross 
seams and double lock seam lengthwise. Sizes : 2, 3. 4, 5 and 6 inches. 

TI^TSiMilTHS. Take notice that we make the best 10-foot Eavetroughs, 
10-foot Corrugated Pipes and Corrugated Sheets made in Canada. 

PROMPT SHIPMENT GUARANTEED. 



WHEELER & BAIN 



Toronto. 



HORSE NAILS. 
"C'brand 50 and 7%p.c.off new li tlOval- 
"M" brand 50, 10 and 5 per cent. J h*ad 
Countersunk. 60 per cent 

HORSESHOES 

F.O.B. Montreal. 
No. 2 No. 1. 
Iron Shoes. and and 

larger, smaller. 
Light, medium, and heavy. . . 3 50 3 75 

Snow shoes 3 75 4 00 

Steel Shoes. 

Light 3 60 3 85 

Featherweight (all sizes) 4 85 4 85 

F.O.B. Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Guelph, 10c. per keg additional. 

Toe weighc steel shoes 6 70 

JAPANNED WARE. 
Discount, 45 and 5 p c. off list, June 1899 
ICE PICKS. 

Star per doz 3 00 3 25 

KETTLES. 
Brass spun, 7% p.c. dis. off new list. 

Copper, per lb 30 50 

American, 60 and 10 to 65 and 5 p.c. 

KEYS. 
Lock, Can., dis., 45 p.c. 
Cabinet, trunk, and padlock, 

Am. per gross 60 

KNOBS. 
Door, japanned andN.P., per 

doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin, per doz 2 75 3 25 

Bronze Genuine, per doz 6 00 9 00 

Shutter, porcelain, F. ft L. 

screw, per gross 1 30 4 00 

White door knobs — per doz. 1 25 

HAY KNIVES. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 

LAMP WICKS. 
Discount, 60 per cent. 

LANTERNS. 

Cold Blast, per doz... 7 0J 

N o. 3 " Wrights " 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner 4 00 

Dashboard, cold blast 9 00 

No. 5 75 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

Porcelain lined, per doz. 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized * 187 3 85 

King, wood 2 75 2 90 

King, glass 4 00 4 50 

Allglass 120 130 

LINES. 

Fish, per gross 105 2 50 

Chalk " 1 90 7 40 

LOCKS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 
Russel ft Erwin, per doz.... 3 00 3 25 

Cabinet. 
Eagle, dis. 30 p.c. 

Padlock 
English and Am., perdoz.... 50 6 00 

Scandinavian, " 1 00 2 40 

Eagle, (lis. 20 to 25 p.c 

MACHINE SCREWS. Iron and Brass. 
Flat head discount 25 p.c 
Round Head discount 20 p.c. 
MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths' perdoz 1 25 1 50 

Carpenters', hickory, per doz 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Yitae, per doz 3 85 5 00 

Caulking each 60 2 00 

MATTOCKS. 
Canadian, perdoz 5 50 6 50 

MEAT CUTTERS. 
American, dis. 25 to 30 p.c. 
German, 15 per cent. 

MILK CAN TRIMMINGS. 

Discount, 25 per cent. 

NAILS. 

Quotations are : Cut. Wire. 

2d and 3d $3 45 83 85 

3d 3 10 3 52 

4and5d 2 85 3 35 

6and7d 2 75 3 20 

8 and 9d 2 60 3 00 

lOand 12d 2 55 2 95 

16and20d 2 50 2 90 

30, 40, 50 and 60d. (base) 2 45 2 85 

Wire nails in carlots are 82.7?% 
Galvanizing 2c. per lb. net extra. 
Steel Cut Nails 10c. extra. 

Miscellaneous wire nails, dis. 70 and 10 p. c 



Coopers' nails, dis. 30 per cent. 
Flour barrel nails, dis. 25 percent 
NAIL PULLERS. 

German and American 185 3 50 

NAIL SETS 
Square, round, and octagon 

per gross 3 38 4 00 

Diamond 12 00 15 00 

NETTING. 
Poultry, 55 per cent for McMullen's 

OAKUM. Per 100 lb. 

Navy 6 00 

U.S.Navy 7 25 

OIL. 

Water White (US ) 16% 

Prime White (U.S ) 15% 

Water White (Can.) 15 

Prime White(Can.) 14 

OILERS. 
McClary's Model galvan. oil 
can , with pump, 5 gal., 

per doz 10 00 

Zinc and tin, dis. 50, 50 and 10. 

Copper, per doz 1 25 3 50 

Brass, " 150 3 50 

Malleable, dis. 25 per cent. 

GALVANIZED PAILS. 

Dufferin pattern pails, dis. 45 p.c. 
Flaring pattern, discount 45 per cent. 
Galvanized wash tubs, discount 45 per cent. 

PIECED WARE. 
Discount 40 per cent off list, June, 1899. 
10-qt. flaring tap buckets, di?. 45 p.c. 
6, lo and 14-qt. fl ring pai s, dis. 45 p.o. 
Creamer cans, dis 45 p c. 
PICKS. 

Per doz 6 00 9 00 

PICTURE NAILS. 

Porcelain head, per gross 175 3 00 

Brass head " .... 40 1 00 

PICTURE WIRE. 
Tin and gilt, discount 75 p c. 
PLANES. 
Wood, bench, Canadian dis. 50 per ceni. 

American dis. 50. 
Wood, fancy Canadian or American 7% 
to 40 per cent. 

PLANE IRONS. 

English, per doz 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 
Button's Genuine per doz pairs, dis. 37% 

40 p.c. 
Button's Imitation, per doz.. 5 00 9 00 

German, perdoz 60 2 60 

PLUMBERS BRASS GOODS. 
Compression work, discount, 60 per cent. 
Fuller's work, discount 65 per cent. 
Rough stops and stop and waste cocks, dis- 
count, 60 per cent. 
Jenkins disk globe and angle valves, dis- 
count, 55 per cent. 
Standard valves, discount, 60 per per cent. 
Jenkins' radiator valves discount 55 percent. 
" " " standard, dis., 60 p.c. 

Quick opening valves discount, 60 p.c. 

No. 1 compression bath cock 2 00 

No. 4 2 00 

No. 7. Fuller's 2 50 

No 4%, " 3 00 

POWDER. 
Velox Smokeless Shotgun Powder. 

1001b. or less 85 

l.tOO lb. or more 80 

Net 30 days. 
PRESSED SPIKES. 
Discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse, per doz !5 1 00 

Axle 22 33 

Screw 27 100 

Awning 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 180 3 60 

Canadian pitcher spout 1 40 2 10 

PUNCHES. 

Saddlers', perdoz 100 185 

Conductors', " 9 00 15 00 

Tinners' solid, per set 00 72 

hollow, per inch.... 00 100 



RANGE BOILERS. 

Galvanized, 3 gallons 7 CO 

35 " 8 25 

" 40 " 9 50 

Copper, 30 " 22 00 

r ' 35 " 26 00 

40 " 30 00 

Discount off Copper Boilers 10 per cent. 

RAKES. 
Cast Bteel and malleable, 50, 10 and 5 p.c. 
Wood, 25 per cent. 

RAZORS. 

per doz. 

Elliot's 4 00 18 00 

Geo. Butler 4 Co. 's, 4 00 18 00 

Boker's 7 50 11 00 

" King Cutter 12 53 50 00 

Wade & Butcher's 3 60 10 00 

Theile & Quack's 7 00 12 00 

REAPING HOOKS. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 
REGISTERS. 

Discount 40 per cent. 

RIVETS AND BURRS. 
Iron Rivets, black and tinned, discount 60 

and lu per cent. 
Iron Burrs, liscount 55 per cent. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in 1-lb. cartons, %c. 

per lb. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in %-lb. cartons, lc. 

per lb. 
Copper Rivets ft Burrs, 35 and 5 p.c. dis. 

and cartons, lc. per lb. extra, net. 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets 
%-lb. cartons, lc. per lb. 
RIVET SETS 
Canadian, dis. 35 to 37% per cent. 
ROPE ETC. 

Sisal. Manila. 

7-16 in. and larger, per lb 10 13% 

%in 11 14% 

% and 5-16 in 15% 

Cotton, 3-16 inch and larger 16 

" 5-32inch 21 

%inch 22% 

Russia Deep Sea 15% 

Jute 8 

Lath Yarn 9% 

New Zealand Rope 10 

RULES. 
Boxwood, dis. 75 and 10 p.c. 
Ivory, dis. 37% to 40 p,c. 

SAD IRONS. per set. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished 62% 

" No. 50, nickle-plated 67% 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 

Dominion Flint Paper, 47% pe cent. 

B ft A. sand, 40 and 5 per cent. 

Emery, 40 per cent. 

Ganet(Rurton's), 5 to 10 p.c. advance on list. 

SAP -SPOUTS. 
Bronzed iron with hooks, per doz. . . 9 50 

SAW8. 
Hand Disston's, dis. 12% p.c. 
S. ft D., 40 percent. 

Crosscut, Disston's, per ft.... 35 55 
S. ft D., dis. 35 p.c. on Nos. 2 and 3. 

Hack, complete, each 75 2 75 

' frame only 75 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional, per 100 lbs 2 75 3 CO 

Solid, " 2 00 2 25 

SASH CORD. 

er lb 23 30 

. SAW SETS. 

"Lincoln," per doz 6 50 

SCALES 
Standard, 4> p.c. 
Champion, 65 p.p. 
Spring Balances. 10 p.c. 
Fairbanks Standard, 35 p.c. 
11 Dominion, 55 p.c. 

" Richelieu, 55 p.c. 

SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's perdoz 65 1 00 

SCREWS 
Wood, F. H., bright and steel, f 7% and lOp.c. 
Wood R. H., " dis. 82% and "lu p.c. 
" F. H., brass, dia. 80 and 10 p.c. 



Wood, R. H., " dis. 75 and 10 p.c. 
" F.H., bronze, dis. 75 p.c. 
" R.H. " 70 p.o. 

Drive Screws, 8714 and 10 percent. 

Bench , wood, per doz 3 25 4 00 

" iron, " 4 25 5 75 

Set, Case hardened, 60 percent. 
Square Cap, 50 and 5 per cent. 
Hexagon Cap, 45 per cent. 
SCYTHES. 

Per doz, net 9 00 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 

SHEARS. 
Bailey Cuilery Co , full nickeled, dis. 60 p.c. 
Seymour's, dis. 50 and 10 p.c. 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 
Canadian, dis. 40 and 5 per cent. 

SINKS. 
Steel and galvanized, discount 45 per cent. 

SNAPS. 
Harness, German, dis. 25 p.c. 

Lock, Andrews' 4 50 1150 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

1, l%lb., perlb 37 

2 lb. or over, per lb 34 

SQUARES. 

Iron, No. 493, perdoz 2 40 2 55 

" Mo. 494, " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, dis. 60 10 and 5 p.c. 
Try and bevel, dis. 50 to 52% p.c. 
STAMPED WARE. 
Plain, dis. , 75 and 12% p.c. off revised list 
Retinned, dis., 75 p.c. off revised list. 

STAPLES. 

Galvanized 3 50 4 00 

Plain 3 15 3 75 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent. 
Poultry netting staples, 40 per cent. 

STOCKS AND DIES. 
American dis. 25 p.c. 

STONE. Per lb. 

Washita 28 60 

Hindostan 06 07 

" slip 09 09 

Labrador 13 

Axe 15 

Turkey 50 

Arkansas 00 150 

Water-of-Ayr 00 10 

Scythe, per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind.2in,40 to 200 lb.per ton .... 25 00 

" under 40 lb. " 58 00 

Grind, under 2 in. thick " 29 00 

STOVE PIPES. 

5 and 6 inch Per 100 lengths 7 00 

7 inch " " 7 50 

ENAMELINE STOVE POLISH. 
No. 4—3 dozen in case, net, casn .... *4 80 
No. 6—3 dozen in case, " .... 8 40 
TACKS BRADS, ETC. 

Per cent 

Strawberry box tacks, bulk 75 ft 10 

Cheese-box tacks, blued 80 & 12% 

Trunk tacks, black and tinned ... .85 

Carpet tacks, blued 80 ft 15 

tinned 80 & 20 

" " (in kegs) 40 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only . 80 

" % weights 60 

Swedes, cut tacks, blued and tinned — 

In bulk 80S 10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk... 85, 12% ft 12% 
" brush, blued ft tinned, bulk. .70 
" gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 ft 12% 

Zino tacks 35 

Leather carpet tacks 55 

Copper tacka 50 

Copper nails 5'% 

Trunk nails, blacs 65 and 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout nails, blued 65 and 5 

Chair nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing 40 

Picture frame points 10 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 



52 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



PITTSBURGH, 

U. S. A. 



MANUFACTURERS 
OF" 



STANDARD CHAIN CO., 

CHAIN 

Proof Coil, B.B., B.B.B., Crane. Dredge Chain, Trace Chains, Cow Ties etc. 

ALEX £?X 8IBB ' -Canadian R e pr MM ta«iv. 8 - ft,^"* * »- 



OF ALL KINDS. 



Montreal. 

For Provinces of Ontario and Quebec. 



For other Provinces. 



Lining tacks, in bulk 15 

'• " solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails in papers 10 

" in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in dozens only 60 

Tin capped trunk nails 15 

Zinc glazier's points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers 90 and 10 

" •' " bulk 40 

TAPE LINES. 
English, ass skin, per doz... . 2 75 5 00 
English, Patent Leather.... 5 50 9 75 

Chesterman's each 90 2 85 

" steel, each .... 80 8 00 

THERMOMETERS. 
Tin case and dairy, dis. 75 to 75 and 10 p.o. 

TRAPS. (Steel.) 
Same, Newhouse, dis. 25 p c. 
Game, H. &N., P. S. & W., 65 p.c. 
Game, steel, 72%, 75 p.o. 

TROWELS. 

Disston's discount 10 per cent. 

German, per doz 4 75 6 03 

8. 4 D., discount 35 per cent. 
TWINES. • 

Bag, Russian, per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply 20 

" 4-ply 26 

Mattress, per lb 33 45 

Staging, " 27 35 



VISES. 

Wrights o 13% 

Brooks o 12-', 

Pi oe Vise, Hinge, No. 1 3 50 

" " " No 2 S 50 

Saw Vise 1 51 9 CO 

ENAMELLED WARE. 

White, Princess, Turquoise, Blueand White, 

discount 50 per cent. 
Diamond, Famous, Premier, 50 and 10 p.c. 
Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent, 50, 10 

and 10 per cent. 

WIRE. 

Brass wire, 50 to 50 and 2% per cent, off the 

list. 
Copper wire, 45 and 10 per cent, net cash 30 
days, f.o.b. factory. 
Smooth Steel Wire, is quoted at the 
following net selling prices : 
No. 6 to 8 gauge $2 90 



2 80 
2 87 
2 90 

2 95 

3 15 
3 37 
3 50 
3 65 



Other size3 of plain wire outside of Nos. 9, 
10, 11, 12 and 13. and other varieties of 
plain wire rema ; n at $2.8) base with 



extras as hefire. The prices for Nor 9 
to 13 include the charge of l'c. 
for oilins:. Extras net per 100 lb.: 
Coopered wire, 60c— tinned wire, $2— 
oiling, 10-).— ipecial hay-bailing wire. 30c. 
—spring wire, $1— best steel wire, 75c— 
bright soft drawn, 15c— in 50 and 100-lb. 
bundles net, 10c— in 25-lb. bundles net 
15c— packed in casks or cases, 15c— 
bagging or papering, 10c. 

Fine Steel Wire. dis. 17 l / 2 per cent. 
List of extras : In 100-lb. lots : No. 
17, 85— No. 18, $5.50— No. 19. $6-No. 20, 
$6.65-No. 21. $7— No. 22, $7.30— No. 23, 
7.65-No. 24, $8-No. 25, $9— No. 26, 
89.50-No.27, 810-No. 28.811 No 29. 
812-No. 30, 813— No. 31, $14— No. 32, 81E 
No. 33. 816— No. 34. 8'7. Extras net- 
tinned wire. Nob. 17-25, $2— Nos. 26-31 
$4— Nos. 32-34. $6. Coppered, 5c— oil 
ing, 10c— in 25-U . bundles,15c— in 5 and 
10-lb. bundles. 25c— in Mb. hanks, 50c— 
in Vi-lb. hanks, 75c— in %-lb. hanks, 81— 
packed in casks orcases, 15c. — bagging or 
papering, 10c. 

Galvanised Wire, perlOOlb.— Nos. 6,7 8, $3 59 
to S3 8 T — No. 9. $2.85 to $3.15— No. 10 
33.60 to $3.95— No. 11, »3 70 to S4.10-No 
12, $3 to 83 30-No. 13, $3.into S3 41— 
No. 14 84.1 1 to $4.50— No. 15. $4.60 to 
$5.05— No 16 $4 85 to $5 35. Bate sizes, 
Nos. 6 to 9, §2 57'/ 2 f.nh Cleveland. 

Clothes Line Wire, solid 7 strand, No. 17 



$4.25: No. 18, »2.65; No. 19. $2.35, fob 
Hamilt n, Toronto, Montreal. 
WIRE FENCING 



F.O.B. 

Toronto 
3 05 

3 OS 



Galvanized barb 

Galvanized, plain twist 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $2.82% 
in less than carlots, and $2.79 in carlots. 

WIRE CLOTH. 
Painted Screen, per 100 sq. ft. , net . . 1 35 
WASTE COTTON. per lb. 

Colored 4 l / 2 to 5 

White, according to quality 6% to 7% 

50C-lb bale lots shaded. 

WRENCHES. 
A.cme, 35 to 37V4 per cent. 
Agricultural, 60 p.c. 
Coe's Genuine, dis. 20 to 25 p.c. 

Towers' Engineer, each 2 00 7 00 

" 8., per doz 5 80 6 00 

G. 4 K 's Pipe, per doz 3 40 

Burrell's Pipe, each 3 00 

Pocket . per doz 25 2 90 

WRINGERS. 

Leader per doz. $30 3' 00 

Royal Canadian.. " 26 00 28 00 

Royal American., " 26 00 28 ''0 

Sampso i " 30 00 

Terms 4 months, or 3 p.c. 30 days. 
WROUGHT IRON WASHERS. 
Canadian make, dipcount, 40 and 5 per cent 



ADVERTISING inWESTERN CANADA 

will be Carefully, Efficiently, and Promptly 
ttended to, by • 

The Roberts Advertising Agency, 

WINNIPEG, CANADA. 






s 



HELF BOXES 
CREW CASES 
AMPLE HOLDERS 




For particulars apply to the patentee 
and manufacturer. 

J. S. BENNETT, 20 Sheridan Ave., TORONTO 



DIAMOND EXTENSION STOVE BACK 



They are easily 
adjusted and 
fitted to a stove 
by any one. 

Please your 
customers by 
supplying them 
immediately 
with what 
they want. 



'-^ 


1, July lltt 

HEFs 


, 1893. 


Canadian Patent, June 14th. 1894. 


^-^7 X 20 1 


1MH5 




,h 




ifjjt^ TfjVVA ; 


■ 




V:: : ;i^VV>- j> 





Sold by 
Jobbers 
of . . . 

Hardware 
Tinware 

and 

Stoves. 



EXTENDED. 



Manufactured by THE ADAMS COMPANY, Dubuque, Iowa, U.S.A. 
" A. R. WOODYATT & CO., Guelph, Ontario. 




"THE EMLYN" SAW BENCH 

Made in 6 sizes. Best value obtainable. Specially 
designed for expoit. With or without "Emlyn" 
Patent Guard. So!e maker — 

CHARLES D. PHILLIPS, 

Cables — Emlyn Engineering Works, 

" Machinery," Newport. Newpokt, Mon. .England. 



IF THE WORDS 

*'Dundas Axe" 



are stamped on an Axe, you can 
rely on its being the best that 
can be made. 



DUNDAS AXE WORKS 

Dundas, Ont. 



PERSONS addressing advertisers 
will kindly mention having 
seen their advertisement in 
Canadian Hardware and Hetal 
Merchant. 



Lockerby & McComb 

AGENTS IN CANADA 

FOR THE 



Celebrated P. & B. 

Cold Storage Lining 

AND 

. . Ruberoid Roofing . . 

P. S.— Prices on Application. 

65 Shannon Street, MONTREAL. 



BUSINESS 
NEWS 

of any kind that is of value to business men 
supplied by our Bureau. We can give you 
market quotations from any town in Can- 
ada, reports from the city markets, stock 
quotations, etc. You can get commercial 
news from any Canadian paper through us. 

Write us, giving us particulars of what 
you want and where you want it from, and 
we will quote you prices by return. 

"Clippings from any Canadian paper on 
any subject." 

CANADIAN PRESS~CLJPPING BUREAU, 

132 McGill Street, MONTREAL, QUE. 
Telephone Main 1255. 
19 Front St. East, Toronto. Telephone 2148. 



75 YEARS. 



CELEBRATED 



ESTABLISHED 1825. 



75 YEARS. 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS. 



Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers, Scissors, 
Tinners' Snips, etc. 




ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST 



R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. KiwA^ RK N.?. p ^rI:A? oChl,mber,st - 

Not connected with any Shear Combination. 

CHAS. F. CLARK, President. JARED CHITTENDEN, Treasurer. 

...ESTABLISHED 1849... 



T" 



Capital and Surplus, $1,500,000. 



Offices Throughout the Civilized World. 



Executive Offices : Nos. 346 and 348 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers information that reflects the financial condition and 
the controlling circumstances of every seeker of mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the 
merchants, by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information no 
effort is spared, and no reasonable expense considered too great, that the results mayjustify its claim as an 
authority on all matters affecting commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have 
been steadily extended, and it furnishes information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized 
world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, jobbing 
and manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporations. 
Specific terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of its offices. Correspondence Invited. 



OFFICES IN CANADA- 



HALIFAX, N.8. 
OTTAWA. ONT. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 
QTJEBKC, QUE. 
VICTORIA, B.C. 



LONDON, ONT. 
ST. JOHN, N.B. 
WINNIPEG, MAN. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



THOS. C. IRVING, Gen, Man, Western Canada, Toronto. JOHN A. FULTON, Gen, Man, Eastern Canada, Montreal, 



TRADE 




IVobles 8? Hoare. 

CORNWALL ROAD STAMFORD STREET. 

LONDON, ENG. 

Manufacturers of 

HIGH-CLASS VARNISHES ONLY 



Which can be obtained direct from the works 
or from the principal Color Dealers in Canada 




"BRASSITE" 




None genuine without the 
above "Trade Mark." 

"Gunn's" 

Patent 

"Grassite" 

Goods. 

Equal to Solid Brass in every 
particular. Cost less money — 
look and wear as well. Our 
sales are increasing all the time. 
Why not increase your sales ? 

THE GIN CASTOR CO. 

Limited. 



KNOX HENRY, Canadian Agent, Room 32, Canada Life Bldg., MONTREAL. 



5' 




: 



Black Diamond File Works 

6. & H. Barnett Company 

PHILADELPHIA 

Twelve «***^^jM»t Medals 




: 



Awarded 
By JURORS * 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 




v %%%%%%^%%%^%%>%^%%^%>%%>%^%%^^ 



1901 





E. ,901 



We manufacture the most popular and best 
selling lines of Garden Hose in Canada. Our "Mal- 
tese Cross" brand we confidently recommend as 
the finest Garden Hose on the market. 

We have other grades not quite so expensive p 
but good reliable brands, viz. : "Lion" (the popular 
medium-priced hose), "King" "Sun" and "Leader." 

Our "Kinkproof " (wire wound) hose is wired 
by a special process controlled solely by ourselves, 
and is so constructed that it may be cut at any 
wind of the wire without loosening or uncoiling, 
the wire being self-gripping throughout each 
length. 

The Gutta Pergha and Rubber Mfg. Go. 

OF TORONTO, LIMITED. 

Head Office and Warerooms— 
49-61-63 West Front St., 

TORONTO. C anada. 

Factories I 15-165 West Lodge Ave. 
124-148 O'Hara Ave. 



American Sheet Steel Co., 



NEW YORK. 



Galvanized Steel Sheets, 

Black Steel Sheets, 

Dewees Wood Co.'s Polished Sheets. 



CORDAGE 



ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



American Tin Plate Co., 

NEW YORK. 

Coke, Charcoal, and Terne Plates. 



PRICES ON APPLICATION TO 

B. &S.H. THOMPSON & CO' Y 

28 St. Sulpice St., MONTREAL, 



Selling Agents for Canada. 



Manila Rope 
Sisal Rope 
Jute Rope 
Russian Rope 
Marline 
Housellne 
Hambrollne 
Clotheslines 
Tarred Hemp Rope 
White Hemp Rope 
Bolt Rope 
Hide Rope 
Halyards 
Deep Seallne 
Ratline 
Plow Lines 



Lathyarn 
Shingleyarn 
Bale Rope 
Lariat Rope 
Hemp Packing 
Italian Packing 
Jute Packing 
Drilling Cables 
Spunyarn 
Pulp Cord 
Lobster Marlln 
Paper Cord 
Cheese Cord 
Hay Rope 
Fish Cord 
Sand Lines 



"RED THREAD" Transmission Rope from the finest quality Manila 
hemp obtainable, laid in tallow. 



CONSUMERS CORDAGE COMPANY, 

■ " Limited 

Western Ontario Representative— 

w". b. stewart. MONTREAL, QUE. 

Tel 94. 27 Front St. West, TORONTO. 



Copper, Tin, Antimony, Etc. 

LANGWELLS BABBITT Z-~.\ 

Montreal. \^X(r, 



^^ 




The Weekly Organ of the Hardware, Metal, Heating, Plumbing and Contracting Trades In Canada. 



VOL. XIII. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. JULY 13, 1901. 



NO. 28 



■TAHDEM" HTI-FMCTIOI METAL. 



'Tandem" Metals are better than 
any other for their purpose, 
and are, therefore : 

The Most Economical. Resistance Reducing. 
The Least Wearing. Journal Preserving. 

The Most Durable. Power Increasing. 

Friction Preventing. Lubricant Saving. 

A QUALITY 

For Heaviest Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Heavy Pressure and High Speed, 

B QUALITY 

For Heavy Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Medium Pressure and High Speed. 

C QUALITY 

For Medium Pressure and High Speed 
or Low Pressure and Highest Speed, 

Sole Agents : 

LAMPL0U6H ft McNAUGHTON, 59 St. Sulpice Street, MONTREAL. 

THE TANDEM SMELTING SYNDICATE, LIMITED 

The largest smelters of Anti-Friction Queen Victoria St., London, E.C. 

Metals in Europe. 




POSITIVE PROOF. 



To test the respective values of brands of Galvanized 
Iron, Professor J. T. Donald, the well-known Montreal 
analyst, made several analyses of" Queen's Head," 
and one of the best competing brands, and reports 
that " Queen's Head " was not only more heavily 
coated, but that the galvanizing was much more evenly 
distributed. 

Result : It outlasts all other makes. 



JOHN LYSAGHT, Limited, Makers, 
BRISTOL, ENG. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO., MONTREAL, 
Managers Canadian Branch, 



GOOD POINTS. 

The Safford Radiator 

has a score of them, but there is one which success has accented — 
it's simplicity. Like all other great inventions, the "SAFFORD" 
is ingeniously simple. It is connected at the joints by patent 
screw nipples. That's what made the "SAFFORD" suc- 
cessful — no bolts, no packing — just a plain screwed 
connection. This means that the "SAFFORD" is posi- 
tively non leakable — positively durable. Of all Radiators 
the "SAFFORD" alone possesses this simple device. 

The "SAFFORD" is made in many designs and 
heights, and is always graceful in its lines and bulk. It 
is made to fit in corners, to circle pillars, and for bay 
windows. 

We will be pleased to give you any information you desire. Remember, we are the 
Largest Radiator Manufacturers under the British Flag. 

THE DOMINION RADIATOR COMPANY, Limited, TORONTO. 




RICE LEWIS & SON 



LIMITED 



Tiling== 



We are able to give 
you estimates on 
work in any part of Canada. 



GRATES S MANTELS 

If you would like to see the latest designs in Wood 
Mantels let us have your address. We will be pleased to 
give you prices and send you our latest catalogue. 

TORONTO. 



Black Sheets 

Common and Dead Flat. 



FROM STOCK OR FOR IMPORTATION. 



SAMUEL, SONS & BENJAMIN, - - LONDON AND LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND 

M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin & Co. 

General Importers and Exporters and Metal Merchants 

27 Wellington Street West, - - TORONTO, ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



James Cartland & Son 

Manufacturers of every desci iption of Limited 

CABINET, BUILDERS', FURNISHING AND NAVAL BRASSFOUNDRY 
BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND. 




London Showrooms: 57 Holborn Viaduct, E.C. 



HOSE 




WATER 

STEAM 

AIR 

FIRE 

BABCOCK 



SUCTION 

ACID 

OIL 

SODA WATER 

HIGH-PRESSURE 



Our Patent Seamless Tube is, without doubt, 

the only perfect construction. 

The Canadian Rubber Co., 



CAPITAL 



$1,500,000.00. 



Montreal. 



Toronto. 



Winnipeg. 



Other Tools are very 
good Tools, but 



"YANKEE TOOLS" 



ARE 
BETTER 




Our "YANKEE" Tool Book 
tells all about them. Mailed 
free on application 



» No. 15. 'Yankee" Ratchet Screw Driver, with Finger Turn on Blade. 




MHIII11 I I I, |'| "" ] gjj; i Ilim— «. 



No. 30 " Yankee" Spiral-Ratchet Screw Driver, Right and Left Hand. 




No. 41. Yankee" Automatic Drill,' Eight Drill Points in Handle. 




No. 50. " Yankee " Reciprocating Drill, for Iron, Steel. Brass, Wood, etc. 



Manufacturers also of 

LIGHTNING, 

GEM and 

BLIZZARD 
Ice Cream Freezers. 

Toy Freezers, 

Ice Shaves and 

Ice Chlppers. 

Fluting Machines, 

Hand Fluters. 



Sold by Leading Jobbers 
in Canada. 



NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 



- 1 No. 60. 

Pocket Magazine 
-1 Screw t Driver. 



Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Oxford Gas Ranges 

EMBODY ALL THE BEST IDEAS YET CONTRIVED. 

They are made in a full line of sizes and styles to meet all 
demands. 

Have large ovens, a special improved oven burner lighter, and the 
most perfect valves and burners known. 

The intense heat furnished by them from a most economical supply 

of gas, delights every customer. It is a talking point of most r\ A 
convincing worth in making sales. m^-' ^ 

This year we emphasize two new styles with 16 and 18 inch square 
ovens, remarkably fine lines that satisfy the popular call for a 
standard quality Gas Range at a very moderate price. 

Correspondence invited. Full Particulars and Price Lists at your service for the asking. 




H 



GURNEY FOUNDRY CO 



LIMITED 



TORONTO WINNIPEG 

THE GURNEY- MASSEY CO., Limited, 



VANCOUVER 

MONTREAL. 



WE HAVE A COMPLETE STOCK. 

Bright Goods, Door Pulls and 
Hat and Coat Hooks. 

ALL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 




Our Mills are in full operation, and we are . in 
position to handle any requirements the trade may have. 

YOUR ORDERS SOLICITED FOR 

Plain, Galvanized and Barb Wire, Wire Nails, 
Wood Screws, Copper and Brass Wire, Bright 
and Galvanized Fence Staples, Netting, Blind and 
Bed Staples, Jack Chain, Cotter Pins. 

Prices quoted on application. 

Dominion Wire Manufacturing Co. 

MONTREAL and TORONTO. 



THEiEwlAlD^Nl 



DRY AIR CLEANABLE 



! REFRIGERATOR. 

135 Modern Varieties. Ash, Oak and Soft-wood Finishes 

METAL, PORCELAIN, SPRUCE LININGS. 

BALDWIN 

Positive Circulation- 
Sanitary— Odorless. 
Latest Cleanable Fea- 
tures—The Strongest 
and Best System of 
Patent Removable 
Metal Air-Flues. 
Air-Tight Lever Locks 
Bali-Bearing Casters. 
Swing Base— in and 

out. 
Rubber around Doors 
and Lids, making 
them doubly air-tight, s 
Handsome Designs. 
Moderate Prices. 

Built in the newest, largest and best equipped refrigerator plant in the East 
run all the year round on refrigerators exclusively ; stock goods ; special 
refrigerators and coolers in sections. 

Handsome Trade Catalogue Ready. 

Baldwin Refrigerator Co., 

BURLINGTON, VERMONT. 



i 




t 






CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



LEWIS BROS. & CO 

^f^MoNTREAL. 



Wholesale 

Hardware 



Long Range, 

Quick, 

Strong 

and 

Safe. 




SMOKELESS POWDER 






s 







EXPLOSIVE, NITRO-COMPOUND, DIV. 2. 




MANUFACTURED AT 

BARWICK WORKS, HERTS, 

THE SMOKELESS POWDER AND 
AMMUNITION COMPANY, LIMITED, 

28, GRESHAM STREET, 
v LONDON, ENGLAND 



ia 



No Jar, 

Perfect 

Combustion, 

Reliable. 



(j 



Tim 



Nlj 



EXTRA HARDENED, DOUBLE WATERPROOF, A GENERAL FAVORITE. 

MADE BV 

The Smokeless Powder & Ammunition Co., Limited 

LONDON, ENGLAND. 



We are sole agents for this Celebrated Powder in Canada and can recommend it as the best 
• Smokeless Powder on the market. 



WRITE FOR PRICES. MAIL ORDERS t 

SHIPPED SAME DAY AS RECEIVED % 



LEWIS BROS. & CO., Montreal 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HENRY ROGERS, 
SONS & CO., 

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND 

Manufacturers of the celebrated 




HRS*C> 

UNION JACK 

CUTLERY 

We make a specialty of 

PLATED WARE, 
FRUIT KNIVES, ETC. 

Our Canadian Representative carries a full line 
of samples. 

Canadian Office : 

6 St. Sacrament St., MONTREAL. 

F. A. YORK, Manager. 




o 
o 

X 

l-H 



a 

5 W 



h 

Z 

o 

z 
o 

r- 
J 

< 
I 



KNOX HENRY 

Heavy Hardware and Metal Broker 
Room 32, Canada Life Bldg., MONTREAL. 




Samples sent free on application. 

HORSE NAILS-" C " Brand Home - H 
Canada Horse Nail Co. 

"BRASSITE" GOODS - Ounn Castor 
Limited, Birmingham, EDg. 



Co. 



THE MOWER 



If you keep the weeds cut so 
they do not go to seed, and cut 
your grass without breaking the 
small feeders of roots, the grass 
will become thick and weeds will 
disappear. The Clipper will do 
it. 



THAT WILL KILL 
ALL THE WEEDS 
IN YOUR LAWNS. 



CANADIAN PATENT FOR SALE. 
SEND FOR CATALOGUE AND PRICES. 




fewftW 



Clipper Lawn Mower Co., 



NORRISTOWN, 
PA. 




This eight-foot Brake bends 22-gauge ioon 
and lighter, straight and true. 

Price, $60 

Very handy header attachment, $15 extra 

if required. 

Send for circulars and testimonials to 

The Double Truss Cornice 
Brake Co, 555*E55t52L 



The Latest and Best. 

H. & R. Automatic Ejecting 
Single Gun. 



Steel and Twist Barrels 
in 30 and 32-inch. 

12 Gauge. 



Model 
1900. 




Worcester, Mass., U.S.A. 

Descriptive Catalogue on request. 




LONDON FENCE 
MACHINES 



Lead on Every Point. 



London Safety Tackle Blocks are equally efficient for 
stretching Coiled Spring Wire and for use as a Hoisting 
Block. They are Ai and rapid sellers. 

TOWNSEND (Lever) STRETCHERS 
BERNARD CUTTING PLIERS 

Only one agency for our machines in each town. Get 
our prices, terms and discounts. 

Coiled Spring and other Fence Wire at right prices to 
the trade. 



London Fence Machine Co., London, Can. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ESTABLISHED I860. 



1901 Style 




PATENT 
APPLIED FOR 



INCORPORATED 1895 



" Empire " 
Stove Pipe 

Made in 5, 6 and 7 inches. 
Nested in Crates of 25 each. 

Simplest Stove Pipe to put together yet made — only tools 
required are a pair of hands. 

Where time is an object, we will guarantee that six of our 
"EMPIRE" STOVE PIPES can be put together in the 
same length of time as one of various other makes, and 
will stay put together. 



THE THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Limited, MONTREAL, QUE. 



JAS B. CAMPBELL. 



WILLIAM PRATT. 




THE ACME CAN WORKS 

Manufacturers of 

Paint and Color Cans, round and square* Varnish 

and Oil Cans. Paint Irons. Paint 

Packages* Lye Tins, 

and every description of Tin or can required by the trade. Write us for 
anything you need in our line. We will be pleased to quote you prices. 



OFFICE AND FACTORY 

Ontario St. and Jeanne D'Arc Avenue, 



MONTREAL 



THE EDINBURGH ROPERIE & 
SAILCLOTH CO., LIMITED 



Manufacturers of 



LEITH. SCOTLAND. 



Cordage of all kinds, Flax Sail- 
cloths, Tarpaulins and Water- 
Proof Cloths, Sewing Twines, 
Fishing Twines, Fishing Lines, 
Tying Twines, Etc., Etc. 

Represented by 



DAVID INCUS, 



9 St. Peter St., 

MONTREAL 



Phone Main 4359. 



CHAMPION FIRE and 
BURGLAR-PROOF . . 



SAFES 



ESTABLISHED HERE SIXTEEN YEARS. 

We sell direct to 
the user, and save 
all commissions. 

SIXTEEN SIZES 
IN STOCK. 

Our small Safe is 
the best, low-priced 
safe in the market. 

GET PRICES. ETC. 




BEFORE BUYING. 



S. S. KIMBALL, 

577 Craig Street, - Montreal. 




WlfH A fl&l*l ANP 

DO YOtf? 

tadiserlisemeti t 
«r» in the 4* 

' 1\£CORO, 

To^orJ-ro 

Ufitl bring you, 
tertdcrsfrem t/rt 
fast contractors 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



The 



44 



PERFECT" 



SAW SETS. 




IMo. I 



jM"*l 






Saw Set. 



INI 



For Hand or 
Tenon Saws. 

D. 3 

For Cross Cut 
Saws. 



Manufactured by 




No. 3-Saw Set. 



A. R. WOODYATT & CO., Guelph, Canada 



For sale by all the 
wholesale trade. 




Kemp's Deluge Sprayers 



will give your 

customers 

perfect satisfaction. 

They are well made. 
They will last. 
They will do the work. 

They are supplied with galvanized or copper reservoir, accord- 
ing to the size of your customer's purse. 
We will be pleased to tell you how little they cost. 

Kemp Manufacturing Company, Toronto, 




VOL. XIII. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, JULY 13, 1901. 



NO. 28 



President, 

JOHN BAYNE MacLEAN, 

Montreal. 

THE MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO. 

Limited. 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which cir- 
culate in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick , P. E . 
Island and Newfoundland. 

orrioia 

MONTREAL 231 McGill Street, 

Telephone 1155. 

TORONTO 10 Front Street East, 

Telephone 1148, 
LONDON, ENQ. - • ■ - tog Fleet Street, E.C.. 

W. H. Miln. 
MANCHESTER, ENQ. - - - 18 St Ann Street. 

H. S. Ashburner. 
WINNIPEG .... Western Canada Block, 

J. J. Roberts. 
ST. JOHN, N.B. - - - No. 3 Market Wharf, 

1. Hunter White, 
NEW YORK. 176 E. 88th Street. 

Subscription, Canada and the United States, $2.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere - - • 12b. 

Published every Saturday. 

. . , ... ( Adscript, London. 

Cable Address \ Adacr ^ t \ Canada. 

FUTURE LINSEED OIL. 

SOME weeks ago, a student of the 
linseed oil market prophesied to 
Hardware and Metal that we 
would likely see 50c. oil again this fall. 
The crops of flax seed in Manitoba and all 
through the United States were reported to 
be exceedingly promising. India was put 
down for a record output and Russia's pro- 
duction was said to be increasing. Every- 
thing pointed to an abundance of seed and 
consequently a low price for oil. Futures 
were quoted extremely low, 63c. at least, 
and everybody, or nearly everybody, 
expected that the quotation would descend 
as the possibilities of a good harvest came 
nearer the point of realization. 

Now, although the crop prospects are but 
^ little changed, we see the market taking a 
contrary course, October oil having ad 
vanced £2 a ton in England during the 
past week. The wise ones are at a loss for 
a satisfactory explanation. True, there are 



" crop killers " at large, as there always 
are at this time of the year, but one does 
not take much stock in them, and reliable 
authorities still say the growing crops are 
in first class shape. It may be, however, 
that English importers, founding their ideas 
on last year's experience, no longer expect 
to get any seed from the United States. 
Last year they calculated on getting 3,000.- 
000 lb., but, on account of wet weather or 
the action of the American Trust, they 
obtained none at all. This they may be 
using as a lever to force up the price at the 
present moment. 

The whole situation is a strange one. 
One would expect that, previous to the 
harvesting of the new crop, the American 
Linseed Oil Trust would force down the 
price in order to buy seed cheaply, but in 
New Yoik to day oil is worth fully $1 per 
Imperial gallon — the highest point attained 
in years. The course of the market will be 
watched with some interest. 



HE CONDEMNS HIMSELF. 

The secretary of the Kentville (N. S.) 
Board of Trade confesses, in a circular he 
has recently sent out, that he, with the other 
members, is getting lax in regard to board 
of trade matters and needs a shaking up. 

It is not usual for secretaries of boards of 
trade or of any other organization to find 
fault with themselves, and such an unusual 
departure as that of the secretary of the 
Kentville board ought to lead to a more 
than usual awakening of the lax members. 

Those who know Secretary Calkin, how- 
ever, can easily imagine that it will not 
require a great deal of effort to stir him up. 
He is too enthusiastic a board of trade man 
for that. 



TAXING COMMERCIAL TRAVELLERS 

THE arrest in Charlottetown lately of a 
well-know traveller owing to a dispute 
about the license which he held to 
sell goods in the Island, directs attention to 
the fact that this law is still in operation. 

We feel sure that this legislation is not 
characteristic of the business spirit of that 
Province, where the merchants whom we 
have come in contact with are fair and 
reasonable. 

It is just a question whether the law is 
constitutional, because, to the Dominion 
Parliament alone belongs the subject of 
trade, and no Province under the British 
North America Act of 1867 has power to 
limit trade with any other Province. It is 
time for the authorities at Ottawa to con- 
sider this question in its legal aspect with a 
view to deciding whether the Provincial 
authorities have the right to maintain it. 

A valued correspondent on the Island 
writes to us as follows on this question : 

*' The Act was introduced a few years 
ago by the Hon. Fred. Peters, who was at 
that time leader of the Liberal Government 
of this Province. The principal reason for 
the tax is to help the revenue of the Island. 
Eight thousand one hundred and forty dol- 
lars was collected from the travellers last 
year. No less than 353 paid $20 each and 
six paid $200 each. The six represented 
firms in the liquor business. I am not in 
favor of the tax, not because it makes any 
difference to our business for buying. I 
believe that indirectly it is hurtful to the 
Island, and that no commercial barrier 
should be allowed in any Province against 
firms doing business in Canada. There 
are a few business men here who favor the 
tax because they do a jobbing trade 
throughout the Island." 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



SIR RICHARD'S ENNUI. 



THERE appears to be a feeling in the 
High Commissioner's office in Lon- 
don that a recent article dealing 
with it was rather harsh. The purpose of 
the article was to point out the importance 
of a commercial agent being sent to Lon- 
don and to deplore that the Trade and 
Commerce Department had not yet done 
so. If, in pursuance of this object, any- 
thing which was said displeased the Big'i 
Commissioner's office, we regret it. 

With what the High Commissioner's 
office does we have little or nothing to find 
fault. As a medium between the Dominion 
and Imperial Governmnets it is a necessary 
office, and the position which the High Com 
niissioner holds undoubtedly makes him 
serviceable in charging the memory of the 
War Office and the Admiralty in regard 
to Canadian products for the army and the 
navy. The last report of the High Com- 
missioner shows that the South-African and 
China Wars were seized as opportunities of 
drawing the attention of the War Office ami 
the India Office to Canadian products. 

" During the last year, as in 1899," says 
the Commissioner in his report, ' 1 have 
paid considerable attention to procuring 
from the War Office and from the India 
Office orders for the supply from Canada of 
articles required by His Majesty's forces, 
both in South Africa and China. That my 
efforts have been successful, will, 1 think, 
be admitted on a perusal of the following 
lists of supplies that have been obtained 
from the Dominion, the value of which 
must, in the aggregate, represent some 
millions of dollars." Then follows a list 
of Canadian articles, such as hay, corned 
beef, boneless chicken, saddlery, clothing, 
flour, which had been purchased by the 
War Department since November, 1899. 

So far so good, but what Canada wants 
as well as is an official— a commercial agent 
—who will be in a position to supply busi- 
ness men with information about business 
men and business matters. This, the High 
Commissioner's office does not supply. 

It is true that it has prepared lists of 
importers and exporters, which have, no 
doubt, proved of assistance in not a few- 
instances. But that in itself is not 
enough. The business men in this country 
and the business men in Great Britain who 
have sought for commercial information 
know this perfectly well. If it were qo( 



so why is it that The Canadian Manufac- 
turers' Association and various boards of 
trade throughout the country have spent so 
much time and money in trying to impress 
upon the Canadian Government the. necessity 
of appointing- a commercial agent in London 
to supply that in which we are now so 
deficient ? It is simply because they recog- 
nize that there is a long-felt want, which, 
in the interests of this country, should be 
filled. Our position is, therefore, based on 
no mere supposition. 

We believe— in fact, we know— that Lord 
Strathcona and Mr. J. G. Colmer, his 
secretary, are doing- the best they can for 
the country they represent. But, as we 
have said before, Lord Strathcona has not 
the time to look after such matters as 
would be required of a commercial agent. 
Then, if Mr. Colmer had the time at his 
disposal his long absence from Canada 
places him at a decided disadvantage. 

We all generally recognize that one of the 
best commercial agents Canada has is Mi - . 
J. S. Larke. Yet his absence of six or 
seven years in Australia has made him some- 
what out of touch with the commercial 
interests of the country he represents, and 
The Canadian Manufacturers' Association 
lias wisely asked to have him recalled for a 
lew months in order that lie may have an 
opportunity of refreshing himself in regard 
to commercial affairs in Canada. 

If the Government does not appoint a 
commercial agent to reside in London, the 
next best thing it can do is to invite Mr. 
Colmer to spend three months in Canada, 
touring it from one end to the other and 
associating himself with those engaged in 
the various industries. 

We, however, only urge this as an alterna- 
tive. The importance of the British trade 
demands the appointment of a commercial 
agent whose whole time and attention shall 
be devoted to the work appertaining to the 
office. This, 'the High Commissioner nor 
anyone in his office is not doing. 

It is true that under existing conditions 
our export trade with Great Britain has 
increased enormously, during the last five 
years by 62 per cent. But what we sup- 
ply, notwithstanding the increase, is only 
an infinitesimal part of what the Mother 
Country imports, being scarcely 5 per cent. 
of the whole, while compared with the 



United States our exports to the parent 
country are only about 12 per cent. 

None recognize better than the manufac- 
turers of this country the need of a com- 
mercial agent in Canada, but notwithstand- 
ing that the Trade and Commerce Depart- 
ment has been memorialized by commercial 
bodies and importuned by the trade press 
and by the daily press of both shades of 
politics, nothing has been done. 

Sir Richard Cartwright is smitten with 
ennui in regard to this as in regard to t 
nearly all other matters appertaining to his 
Department. And it looks as though Sir 
Richard will have to go before a commer- 
cial agent in Great Britain is forthcoming. 



SHARP ADVANCE IN PARIS GREEN. 

Quite a sharp advance has taken place in 
paris green, our quotations being 2c. per 
lb. higher than a week ago. The prices to 
the retail trade are now as follows : Blad- 
ders, in barrels, 18 3-4c; kegs, 19c; 50 and 
100-lb. drums, 19 l-2c: 25-lb. drums, 20c.; 
lib. papers, 2U 1 -2c.; 1-2-lb. papers, 22 
l-2c. ; 1-lb. tins, 21 l-2c; 1-2-lb. tins, 21 
l-2c. 

(Jwing to the warm weather it has been 
difficult to get men to work on the manu- 
facture of paris green. It is this, in view 
of the good demand that is being experi- 
enced for this insecticide, that has been the 
principal factor in bringing about the 
higher prices. 



A COMMENDABLE INNOVATION. 

One of the partners of a well-known 
wholesale house has persuaded one of his 
sons to Spend a part of his school holiday - 
in accompanying one of the firm's travellers 
on his regular route. 

The idea is a commendable one. A young 
man designed for a commercial career can 
scarcely begin too soon to lay the founda- 
tions necessary to success. And there is 
scarcely a better way of getting a start 
than by being taken under the wing of an 
experienced traveller on such a trip as that 
being undertaken by the young man in 
question. And then it is a good way of 
spending a holiday as well as an admirable 
way of gaining experience. 

It is a matter that we think worthy of 
the attention of other wholesale merchants 
who have sons who are taking a rest from 
their studies. 



THE DEMAND FOR ROPE. 

One of the features of the wholesale trade 
is the demand that is being experienced for 
rope, particularly in 7-S and 1-inch sizes 
for hay-fork business. 

Business is always fairly good at this 
time of the year, but both manufacturers / 
and jobbers report that this season it is 
more than usually so. 

With the hemp market steady the out- 
look is for a firm price in rope. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



BUSINESS MEN AND ROYALTY. 



CANADA'S loyaltj to the British 
Empire is well known, And pre- 
parat ions are being made to 
emphasize it durijig the Forthcoming visit 
of the Duke and Duchess of York. But 
while this is onlj natural and proper it is 
to be Imped that in the exhibitions of 
loyalty nothing will be forgotten that shall 
exhibit the resources of the country. 

It must not be forgotten that it is nol 
merely the Royal personages and their 
retinue that will \isii us. There are in 
their train several of Great Britain's lead- 
ing journalists and artists, the latter oi 
whom will do a great ileal of illustrative 
woi'k i"i theii respective journals. It is of 
the utmost importance that the natural 
resources < if eai b and everj part of the 
country shall I"' brought into as much 
prominence as possible. 

Canada is undoubtedly a country wonder- 
fully rich in natural resources. We all 
know how dense a great many people in 
t ireat Britain are in regard to this tail. 
Even tin' extent and beauty of our cities 
an; surprising to many of those from the 
other side of the Atlantic who visit us. 
What, therefore, must, it, be with regard to 
many of our natural resources that are not 
so observant to tin.' eve '! 

This density is often sources of .amusement 
to us, but after all is not the onus largely 
Upon ourselves '.' We think it is. 

The enterprising rchant, by window 

displays, by advertising, or through the 
medium of iiis travellers keeps iiis wares in 
the public eye. 

Nations are but aggregations of indivi- 
duals. If they wish to develop the resour 
with which nature has endowed them 
th'-v should not miss an opportunity of 
showing the world what they possess. Can- 
ada has nol been as enterprising in this 
pect as the circumstances warranted. 
( onsequently for much oi the ignorance 
which obtains on the other side of the 
Atlantic in regard to Canada we are to 
blame. 

For the reasons already set out the visit, 
of the Royal couple will afford Canada, an 
exceptionally good opportunity for us to 
exhibit our products of the factory, field, 
farm, forest, and mine. 

There will liea few months before Royalty 
will lie in our midst. Imt there is no tin;.' 
t" waste No one is interested more than 
tin business men of tin' country in making 
the sojourn "i our visitors pleasant, inter- 
esting, and instructive, and they should 
lend their influence to at once launching 
l"ii I -'In- s which shall attain the maxi- 
mum of g I I'm Canada as well as the 

maximum of entertainment for our Royal 
visitors. 



QUALITY IN HARDWARE. 

M\ N L FACTI RERS of articles apper- 
taining to the hardware trade can 
scarcely pay too much attention to 
quality. Someone has said that the 

■• remembrance oi quality remains long 
after the price is forgotten." If this is 

I i I any one line it is true of liar I i , t\ 

Frw people, indeed, are able to even approxi- 
mately judge the qualitj of many lines of 
hardware. Tiny have in wait until the 
test of wear a in I tear has been applied. 

In these days, when low-priced goods are 
so much sought after, there is undoubtedly 
a strong temptation to pander to it, but 
he who stops and thinks cannot but realize 
that submission to it is fraught with 
dangerous results. 

No one, be he manufacturer, wholesaler, 
or retailer can establish a, permanent repu- 
tation on low-priced goods. Jt is no more 
possible than it is for an individual to 
build up a good character on low prac- 
tices. And goods must have character to 
have reputation. 

It does not follow that a manufacture! 
should refuse to make or a merchant refuse 
in sell low-priced goods. What we desire 
to point out is that it is a short-sighted 
policy for anyone to attempt to establish 
a reputation on low-priced and inferior 
quality goods. 

Some manufacturers in order to supply 
the demand for low-priced and inferior 
goods are putting such goods on the mar- 
ket uinier different brands and trademarks 
from those liorne by the products upon 
which they have established reputations. 
Others have gone as far as to organize com- 
panies bearing distinctively different names 
from that of the parent concern with the 
same object in view. 

The successful firms in tin; world are tin.' 
firms who have made quality and not price 
the goal of t heir ambition. 

It is fallacy, however, for a manufacturer 
or business man to think that because he 
has an article of excellent quality that it 
will find a market of its own volition. How- 
ever good an article mav be the fact must 
he impressed upon the merchants who sell 
it and upon tiie people who consume it. Ill 
other words, it must be pushed. 



THE VALUE OF THE QUIET DAYS. 

TO the shrewd, wide-awake retailer the 
days of the year when trade is dull, 
when buyers are few and easily 
served, when the "loss receipts are hardly 

i e than enough to pay running expenses 

are not without value: nor are they, in 
fail, always the least valuable to him. 
The quiel days of .luly (though they 

should not be all quiet days during this 
month, by any means), furnish an excellent 
opportunity for a midsummer readjustment 
of stock. Practically every hardwareman 
cairns some stock, which, if not pushed, 



is likely to become dead stock. For this 
rea on it is well i . . overhaul kock at lea i 

t w ice a y ear if possible in in der t lial an 

accurate knowledge may be possessed of 

what stuck should be "sold out " even at 
■ i eiit . or w hat should lie replenished. 
Special attention should be given, of course, 

to summer goods, for what of these Inn \ 
not sold during the next six or eight weeks 
is bound to lie on t he shelves for anut he, 
year. It would be well, however, to ha,VI 
a watchful eye on fall goods, SO as to lie 
able to stock up any lines which prove tu I'l- 
sliort at the advantag is terms that are 

sometimes offered early buyers. Experience 
has proved that it pays to have an accurate 
knowledge of what stock is held, and the 
quiet days provide the opportunity tu 
secure such knowledge. 

It is the habit of many of the most up 
In date retailers In plan ahead, to consider 
in advance what steps they should make tu 
increase their trade. There are so many 
adjuncts to the hardware business that, the 
limits to the ambitions of a shrewd retailer 
arc wide enough to offer ample rewards for 
the time and thought spent in planning In 
"reach out." 'I he writer has in mind a 
young hardware firm who were relentlessly 

aelive. Each quiet season seem~ In lie but 
an opportunity to them to bring to fruit 
some extension. Now they handle harness. 
carriage hardware, machinists' supplies, as 
Well as hardware and tinware. They have 
also a, plant for repairing bicycles, and a 
foundry for making lucks. boat hunks, 
springs and miscellaneous iron goods. 

But, in any case, duly or August should 
provide a time for recuperation to the hard- 
wareman and his clerks. The keenness of 
compel it ion makes business a strain that is 
well to be freed from at least one fortnight 
each year. ( io away and take a rest, and 
you will return to work a stronger, clearer 
headed and better naturcd business man. 



SHARP FLUCTUATIONS IN TIN. 

THE feature of the metal trade is (lie 
sharp fluct nations in tin on the 
London market. During the last 
ix'n days they have been severe. From 
Wednesday to Monday last there was an 
advance of t7 5s. in spot tin and a decline 
of 15s. in futures. On Tuesday morning 
spoi tin sold down to £-135, a decline of £. r >, 
but reached and went back to «C I J < • , futures 
meanwhile maintaining a discount of from 
t'hi ."is. to £21. 

But the most sensational feature was on 
Wednesday, when prices declined on spot 
tin C\'2 from the lowest point, closing weak 
at £128. 

New York is easy in sympathy with the 
London market, and October tin was offered 

it 2Gc. For spot tin buyers vvuiild not, 

according to latesl reports, pay mure than 
'21.2ov.. although earlier in the day they 
paid 50c. more than that figure. 

In Canada jobbers are quoting the same 
figures as they did a week ago for spot tin. 



10 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



>♦+♦♦♦♦< 



THE ART OF WINDOW DRESSING. 



>♦+»♦♦♦« 



HARDWARE STORE WINDOW 
DISPLAY. 

By R. J. Hamilton. 

II 1 is apparent to the most casual observer 
that the matter of window display 
among hardwareraen has never before 
received the attention now accorded it. Our 
trade papers of years gone by gave the sub- 
ject but scant notice, seeming to deem the 
mattei' a thing of personal taste only, and 
suited only to those of us who were favored 
with particularly suitable show windows 
and an abundance of time for their atten- 
tion. But the awakening seems to have 
come, and a logical one it is. It is not 
a matter of taste or luxury, but of dollars 
and cents. To gain attention to your busi- 
ness is to advertise it. If your window 
display is attractive, you are gaining atten- 
tion and advertising your goods ; if. on the 
other hand, the display is made a matter of 
no moment, you are not only missing that 
chance of advertising, but. worse yet. you 
are gaining unfavorable notice. Attention 
in your display means publicity, and pub- 
licity is but another term for advertising. 
You know that good advertising pays. To 
come to the point, the question is: How 
can T best advertise by the use of my show 
window ? Do not pass this thought over 
too hurriedly. 

THE WINDOW AS AN ADVERTISING 
MEDIUM. 

That you have studied advertising in some 
of its phases, as applied to the needs of 
your particular business, goes without say 
ing. Consider, then, your window display 
as a \ital. integral part of that advertising. 
(live it vour personal supervision, at least, 
and as you know how best to use your 
advertising in the light of local conditions, 
in just this effective, thoughtful way treat 
your window display- an advertisement that 
stands you in stead 21 hours a day and 
every da\ in the year ; an advertisement 
nut bounded by " sworn circulations," but 
only b\ the number of eyes that can be 
attracted to it. It is the eye to which 
you must primarily appeal. First of all. 
then. i 

MAKE YOUR WINDOW AN ATTIiAC 
TIVE ADVERTISEMENT. 

Hut few of us have at our command the 
means of attraction possessed by our city 
merchants, such as large windows, mirror 
backgrounds and electrical effects, but there 

is this consolation, that the less our local 

advantages the m sure is our reward for 

ingenuity in display. \ background and 
window floor covering of cheesecloth, either 
in the simplicity of pure white or in har- 
moniously arranged colors, say, white for 
background and blue for floor covering, 
often suffices to give tone to an otherwise 
unattractive display 

THE BACKGROUND. 
Stretch a wire across the back of your 

window and from this wile drape nol 

stretch the cloth ; put down the floor cov 
cring and then arrange the window display, 

and the effect will surprise as well as please 
you. Not only have you gained an attrac- 
tive background, but you have shut off the 
shadows and indefiniteness of an open win- 
dow. Unless your window is enclosed make 

* Prize essav in Iron Age. 



it a ride never to place a display without 
l; i \ i 1 1 ll to it some kind of a background. 
even though it In- one constructed of wash 
boilers piled up criss cross fashion or of 

stove boards set on edge. 

Another simple yet surprisingly attractive 

window setting is made by completely. 
inclosing the interior of the window with 
common 2-inch mesh poultry wire, and cov- 
ering (his on thi' inside with tissue paper 
of appropriate color, pushing the paper into 
the meshes of the wire as thorough^ and 
evenly as possible. The effect will be a 
wavy, harmonious setting that is sure to 
attract attention, especially at night if the 
w indovv be 

WELL LIGHTED. 

Whatever the display or its setting, the 
matter of the lighting of the window is of 
no small importance. That electricity is 
best is indisputable, because of the unlim- 
ited changes of color, arrangement and posi- 
tion that are possible bv the use of incan- 
descent lights : and yet we have seen the 
window of the country merchant Indited by 
lanterns with variously colored globes 
attract more real attention than the gaylj 
lighted windows of his city brother. No 
mattei' what our facilities for illumination, 
try lighting your windows for a week bv 
means of candles freely placed about the 
display. and see if it does not attract 
at t cut ion. 

The suggestions which have been given 
are but sonic which can be used in better 
inc. tin 1 genera] effect of many show win 

dows. Attention to the trade papers, and 
the exercise of a little thought, ingenuity 
and observation, will enable you to accom- 
plish wonders in this direction. Now as 
(o 

Till-'. GOODS TO BE DISPLAY ED. 

.Stop and think in what way you have 
had the best results from other advertising. 

Nou say that you have always lad g I 

results from advertising seasonable goods; 

then to be sure do not break your rule in 
this case. dust as the manufacturer and 
jobber must anticipate the Deeds of the 
retailer, so we believe it wise to place your 

seasonable display, very early. Public opin- 
ion is not a thing to be sliaped in a day, 
and if you expect it to be believed that youi- 
is the most desirable stock of seasonable 
goods then tell of them, advertise them and 
show them beforehand. 

PARTICULARIZE YOUR DISPLAY. 

\ou claim to always try to have your 
advertising to thu point, \vhen advertising 
an article you concentrate your force on that 
one thing for the time being. Particular- 
ize your display. By this is meant that 
attention should be given to the one thing 
at hand. " Don't aim at t lie whole flock, 
but pick your bird " is an old hunting 
maxim well applicable to window advertis- 
ing. If you are displaying a gasoline 
stove, do not detract from it by showing a 
dozen other things. If one stove does not 
suffice, then display two or half a do/en. 
Hut while you are about it make that easo 
line stove window, so that Mrs. A. and 
Mrs. B., having seen your window, will 
almost unconsciously mention it the next 
Mine the gasoline stove subject comes up in 
their conversation. That many disagree 
with this would seem to be proved by I lie 
large number of window displays that seem 



to be arranged with the sole idea of show- 
ing the variety of stock carried, it being 
thought that in variety of display there is 
at tract ion. This may be true, but we do 
not believe that this is the kind of attrac- 
tion that sells the most goods. At any 
rate, this matter of particularization of dis- 
play is well worth careful thought and 
trial. Wherever it is possible in a dis- 
play 

SHOW THE USES OF THE GOODS 
DISPLAYED. 
If you have a gasoline stove display have 
the stoves burning, part of the time at 
least. If you show a. steel range, and gas ' 
is at hand, why not build a mock fire of 
sticks of wood or of coals ingenuously 
placed over a well hidden nas jet. Fly 
screens arranged to keel) > n a swarm of the 
"real article "—although in itself certainly 
nor an attractive scene — will attract as 
much attention as an expensive newspaper 
advertisement. These are but very simple 
examples of the many ways in which goods 
may be displayed in connection with their 

uses. 

1ND1YID1A1.1TY. 

Have you ever taken a pride in giving to 
your advertising a tone that is all your 
own? We believe i ha t all will agree that 
a tone of individuality is commendable in 
all advertising, and therefore, of course, in 
w indovv display s. 

He individual. This is a matter i o 

easily hinted at than definitely expressed, 
and yet it is the writer's opinion that 
cv.rv merchant recognizes the weight of 

tin suggestion that he should acquire for 
his window display a reputation along at 
least some one iine - seasonableness of goods 

displayed, a constant display of new goods 

placed on the market, the presence and 

frequent change of price cards, " bargain 
windows, or adaptation of goods displayed 
to local and national happenings. These 
are suggestions of lines along which the 
dealer can work. Not that you should fol- 
low seasonableness of display, for instance, 
to the exclusion of all other points, but 
that if this i- vour choice have it reCQg 
ni/ed as vour specialty, anil in the course 
of time it will be your window that will 
be watched when seasonable goods are 
thought of. 

PRICING GOODS ON DISPLAY . 

The matter of pricing goods on display is 
the signal for a babel of opinions. It i- 
certainly true t iiat articles of staple use 
and uniform quality can lie best sold in 
this way if the prices are right, while, mi 

li t her hand, you would not think of 

putting a price on a new kind of churn or 
washing machine, for you say it requires 
" talk " to sell such goods. A rock bot- 
tom price on clothes wringers of good qual- 
ity would mi an nothing to those accus- 
tomed to buying racket store goods of the 
same pattern. And SO we believe that great 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 



WIRE 



Prompt Shipment! 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited 
HAMILTON, ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



11 



care must I" 1 taken in t he use i >t a •< « k I 
a thing even as price cards. 

PitlCE CARDS. 

So hackneyed and abused have become the 
methods of marking prices on goods that we 
believe it the best plan simply to mark the 
price in plain, bold figures, without an,\ 
attempt at making the public believe that 
they are getting things at half price or 
next to nothing. You will not I" 1 believed 
if you do use these methods, while in the 
eyes of intelligent people you are lowering 
your dignity. If you have enough odds and 
.. ends to make a display, do so, mark the 
prices down, ami label and advertise the 
displaj as a " bargain window," and the 
results will usually be satisfactory. 

It' the price raid system is used you will 
feel more than ever the necessity of attract- 
ing to your display more attention than 
would come to it in the ordinary channel 
[f the display is put there to be soon, why 
mil help it along ? Tn other words. 
ADVERTISE YOUR DISPLAY. 

There can be no elemenl of loss in an 
expenditure for this purpose, for it is keep- 
ing your name before the public, even 
though the direct returns are small. Tr\ 
the use of newspaper locals in Ems connec- 
tion, simply announcing to the public that 
there is something worth seeing in such and 

sueh a window. Curosity will usually do 

i lie rest. Such a method can be worked 
successfully for onlj a few times, however, 
and sn we must usually rely on a straight- 
forward statement as to the goods and their 
attractiveness. Tn addition to this sort of 
advertising there is an unbounded field open 
to those who have time and means to gain 
for their displays newspaper mention and 
town talk, because of unusual novelty and 
interest, as is occasioned li\ the use ■> 
mechanical effects or by the introduction of 

Outside features of interest. It matters not 

what the character of the display, try to 
make it a paying advertisement. 

KLONDYKE TRADING CHANGES. 

ATacoma corres] dent of The Fi- 
nancial News, London, Eng., 
writes: "The . outfitting of large 
numbers of miners For Alaska in the cities 

Of Puget Sound has apparent l.v become a 
thing of the past. For lour seasons fol- 
lowing the discovery of the Klondyke out- 
fitting was one of the chief industries of 
Tacoma and Seattle. The gold-seeker pur- 
chased his provisions, clothing, tools, and 
other supplies, paid freight on them to 
Skagway or Nome, and was ready for busi- 
ness on his arrival in the gold country. The 
development of Alaska and the British 
Yukon has resulted in a great change. The 
provisions and clothing are shipped north- 
ward in quantities cheaper than the pro- 
spector can take them. lie is also saved 
the bother of assembling an outfit and so 
ing that it is kept together until he 
reaches his destination. 

" In a word, Alaska business has settled 
down into the regular channels. It is now 
the wholesalers who arc paying the great- 
est attention to Alaska and the Klondyke, 
so far as the supplies to lie used by the 
miners are concerned. This does not mean 
that the Sound cities are not benefited by 
the Alaska trade to fully as great an ex- 
tent as in past seasons. The gold output has 
increased so rapidly, and is now spread out 
over so much of the entire year that the 
arrival "f treasure is almost a daily occur- 
rence. Every steamer brings its quota of 
successful miners, and their arrival means 

large expenditures for clothing and the other 
habiliments of modern civilization. This 
continuous stream of gold makes retail 



^ 



if 



l»AINT& 



T^ 



tf 



Paint and Prosper 

is the advice you give your customers. 

Sell paint and prosper, is the advice we give you. 

But in neither case is this advice worth a cent unless the 
paint is i;uod paint. 

Good paint is the only kind that pays. Poor paint means 
loss — loss to the man who sells it, to the man who uses it, and 
to the property it's used on. 

If you've been trying to build business on "cheap" paint 
or profitless lead and oil, you have been wasting your time 
and energy. But if you are in earnest and really want to 
make a success out of the paint business, take hold of 

The Sherwin-Williams Paint 

There's money in it ; there's true value in it ; there's ad- 
vertising back of it to help you win. 

Write for the "B-13" Booklet — telb you how to prosper 
in paint-selling. 



The Sherwin-Williams Co. 

PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 

CLEVELAND. 
CHICAGO. NEWARK, BOSTON, SAN FRANCISCO. 

NEW YORK, MONTREAL, TORONTO, KANSAS CITY. 



trade brisk, and compensates in a large 

measure for the loss of tl utfitting trade. 

What Puget Sound merchants have lost in 
this respect has been gained by the mer- 
chants and trading companies of Skagway. 
White Horse. Dawson, and Nome, 

" The wholesalers of Tan una and Seattle 
an 1 supplying the northern merchants to a 
large extent, though it is undeniably true 
that a glowing quantity of merchandise des- 
tined fur Alaska and Dawson is being ship- 
ped in carload lots from the wholesale cen- 
tres of the East. Vancouver and the cities 
of Eastern Canada are making a stronger 
bid for the trade of the Klondyke than ever 
before. The United States Government has 
played into their hands to an almost 
remarkable degree by the making of Skag- 
way a sub-port of entry. The full meaning 
mi tiiis fact is now better appreciated than 
ever before. Many carloads of goods which 
formerly came exclusively from the United 

Slati- arc now being shipped from Mont- 
real. Toronto and Winnipeg to Yancouver, 
and thence resliipped bv British steamers 
to Skagway and through American terri- 
ior\ in bond to the- upper Yukon towns and 
I law son. American goods shipped in t ho 
same manner must pay duty when British 
territory is reached.'' 



ALUMINUM BRONZE POWDERS. 

GERMANY is (lie home of bronze 
powder manufacture, and the method 
of making aluminum powder in that, 
countrj is first to roll the aluminum into 

thin strips or ribbons, then beat it into 
leaf In power hammers, and final!} stamp 
it into powder. 



Much of the aluminum 



powder is sold for silver bronze. The silver 
bronze is not made from silver, but from a 
cheap alloy having the color of silver. It is 
-oid for less per pound than the aluminum, 

hut the silver liron/e being heavier, it pound 
of aluminum bronze will cover much more 
surface and is really cheaper. There is a 

tendency to adulterate the aluminum powder 
with other metals, which destroys the lus- 
tre and decreases the value of the powdered 
aluminum. If (he pure article is wanted 
it must be made from pure metal and kept 
trom other powders. 

The uses of aluminum bronze powder are 
everywhere in evidence. It is used as a 
paint for coveting iron, lead, zinc, wood, 
etc., in all tonus. A common use at pres- 
ent is in covering letter boxes. Of late 
years stove manufacturers have been usiii" 

it for the coating of stoves and in the trim- 
mings. Ill some cases it has replaced tin- 
plate. The paint is being used extensive!} 

on steamers and yachts. it is probable 
that the next few years will see a much 
larger consumption of aluminum bronze 
powder than at present. It is considered 
an ideal coating material lor the use o| 

plumbers, steamfitters and stove manufac 
turers. When mixed with the proper grade 
of varnish it adhers readily to iron, lead 
and zinc, and the paint is not affected by 
vary in; temperatures and Liives a clean, neat 

appearance to radiators, pipes and stoves. 

Powdered aluminum has received recently 
in extremely interesting metallurgical appli- 
cation in the reduction of refractory oxides 
to the metallic slate. By mixing the pow- 
der with oxides and igniting the mixture 
an intense heat is generated, which is suffi- 
cient to melt the reduced metal . — Aluminum 
World. 



12 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS, COM 
PROMISES. 

J. T. Cute, general merchant, Chicoutimi, 
Que., lias assigned. 

Adclanl Many, general merchant, St. 
Scbasticn, Que, lias compromised. 

Arthur Lacoste has been appointed curator 
01' Mary A. Lee, general merchant. Grand 
Mere, Que. 

V. E. Paradis has been appointed curator 
of G. liioux, general merchant, Trois Pis- 
toles, Que. 

Assignment has been demanded of The 
Albert Bryce Co., dealers in typewriters, 
etc. Montreal. 

Lafontaine & Lavoie. general merchants, 
St. Cyrille de Wendover, Que., arc offering 
75 cents on the dollar. 

A. J. (Mark & Son. dealers in agricultural 
implements, [ngersoll, Ont., have assigned 
to David G. Cuthbertson. 

R. J. Belanger, general merchant, Port- 
neuf ( Saguenay Co. ), Que., has comprom- 
ised at 50 cents on the dollar. 

Burton & Weir, general merchants. Cop- 
per Cliff, Ont., have assigned to J. I» 
Walker. Sudbury, and a meeting of creditors 
will be held on the 13th inst. 

The commercial agencies report the fore 
closure of chattel mortgage on W. G. Blvd. 
hardware dealer, Melita, Man., anil also the 
sale of Mi-. Blyth's business to Hamlin 
Bins. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND 
DISSOLVED. 

Riopel iV Vaillancourt, carriageniakers, 
Mont real, have dissolved. 

Savage iV McCanna, general merchants. 
Granby, Que., have dissolved. 

Weston iV: Sim. hardware dealers, etc.. 
Barwick, Ont.. have dissolved. 

Lafonfeaine & Lavoie, general merchants, 
St. Cyrille, Que., have dissolved. 

Pritehard & Hell, dealers in agricultural 
implements, Carman, Man., have dissolved. 

\V. .1. Holmes, general merchant, Big 
Forks, N.U.T.. has admitted R. J. Holmes 
to pari uership. 

J. D. Ells has admitted Kbenezer Bige- 
low, jr., Mnder the style of Bigelow & Ells, 
general merchants, Kingsport, N.S. 

Jonathan Storey and Roderick Campbell 

have registered partnership under the Style 

of Storej & Campbell, wholesale and retail 
hardware dealers, etc., Vancouver. 

SALES \1 U)E AND PENDING. 

Marquis Bros., general merchants, Ripley, 
Ont., have sold out. 

The assets of Catherine Elliott, grocer, 
Ottawa, have been sold. 

The assets of <:. \l. Dalglish, match 
manufacturer, Hull. Que., are to he sold. 

The stoch of -I. M. Phillips, stove and 

tinware dealer', has Inch -i,| ( ] by tender. 

dames li. Furlong, harness dealer. Barrie, 
Out., is advertising his business for sale. 

11. L. Heath, general merchant. Hunts- 
ville. Out., is advertising his business for 
sale. 

The stock of .1. E'arent, general merchant, 
Liimouski, Que., has been sold at (i7 cents 
on the dollar. 

The assets of d . A. Fectcau, St. Loch's 
Sporting Goods Co., Quebec are advertised 

tu be snld nn the |5th inst. 

CHANGES. 

A. Dussault & Co. have registered as 
-tine dealers, etc.. Muni real. 

Win. d. Bellingham has registered as pro- 
prietor of The Montreal Malleable iron 
Murks. 

St Hie iV Carson, harness manufacturers. 
iic.. Vancouver, have been succeeded by 
Storey & Campbell. 



FIRES. 

The stuck ill tirant. Bros.' hardware and 
tinware store, Ottawa, has been damaged by 

lire 

Thoinas U. Morgan, cement manufacturer, 
Longue Point, Que., has been burned out : 

pari ia 1 1 v insured. 



The Woodburn Sarven Wheel Company, bee. is dead. 



Limited, of Canada. St. Catharines, Ont.. 
has suffered loss by fire; insured. 

Alfred Dickie, sawmiller, Lower vStew iacke 
N.S., has been burned out. 
D LATHS. 

dean F. Dagneau, of Noel & Dagneau, 
wholesale and retail hardware dealers, Que- 



DISTINGUISHING FEATURES ^VVuV^dTt^? between the best 

Semi-Hammerless. 

Trigger Action (neither side nor top snap). 
Automatic Ejector or Non-Ejector (at option of user). 
Flush Head Locking Bolt (positive and simple 1 . 
Absolutely safe (accidental discharge impossible). 
Metal Tipped Fore End. 



Features that are found only in the 



IVER JOHNSON 



The World's Single Gun Standard of Excellence. 




Iver Johnson's Arms & Cycle Works, 



Branches- New York— 99 Chambers St. 
Boston— 165 Washington St. 
Worcester— 364 Main St. 



FITCHBURG, Mass. 



Have you investigated the merits of" 

^BOECKH'S 

ADJUSTABLE 

TABLES ? 

They will 
enable you to make attractive 
displays, with very little work. 

They are handsomely finished and are an ornament to 

any store. 

Write for Illustrated Booklet and Price List. 




Boeckh Bros. & Company, 



80 York St., TORONTO. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



13 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS 

37-39 Front Street West, Toronto. 

HARW^T TOOLS. 

J.^W^^^Hay Forks. 



&C0 



ONLY 
HOLE AL 



Also 




Also 



Snaths 



Manure 
Forks. 



No. 21 — a Oval Tine, Straight Handle, Plain Ferrule. 
No. 23 — 2 " Strap. " 

No. 22 — 2 Bent Plain 

No. 24 — 2 " Strap. " 




Straw Forks. 



No. 25 — 3 Oval Tine, Straight Handle, Plain Ferrule. 




No. 27 — 3 
No. 26 — 3 
No. 28—3 
No. 16 — 3 
No. 29 — 4 
No. 19 — 4 



Bent 



Strap. 

Plain 

Strap. 

Plain 

Plain 

Strap. 



Cradles 
Scythes 

and 

Stones 

Hay 

Fork 

Pulleys. 



Steel Barley Forks. 



14-in. Tine. 



Wood Barley Forks. 





Oiled, 4 Tine, with Guard. 



No. 33—4 Oval Tine, Bent Handle, no Guard. 
No. 34—4 " " " with Guard. 



No. 30 — 3 Oval, 1 1 Tine, Bent Handle 
No. 31—3 " 16 " 
No. 32—4 " 16 " 

H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., Toronto. 

Graham Wire and Cot Nails are the Best. 

Factory: Dufferin Street, Toronto. 



OUR PRICES 

ARE RIGHT 



WE SHIP 

PROMPTLY 



14 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



SUGGESTIONS TO EMPLOYES. 

A LITTLE booklet entitled " Sugges- 
tions," has been issued to its 
employes by the Canada Biscuit 
Co., Limited, Toronto. As other business 
men may find it to contain ideas which may 
be helpful to them we herewith reproduce 
it. It reads : 

Anything that is worth doing at all is 
worth doing well. 

The working hours belong to the com- 
pany. Time lost by you tells against its 
prosperity. 

Do not waste anything. 
Respect yourself and others will respect 
you. 

There is a place for everything. See that 
everything is in its place. 

Pluck and backbone are essential to 
success. 

A good word honestly spoken about a 
company by its employes is the best kind 
of an advertisement. 

Taste in putting up goods must be a 
leading feature with all who have this work 
to do. Goods well and carefully packed 
are half sold. 

The head of every department is expected 
to see that his or her part of the factory is 
neat and clean at all times. ' ' Soap and 
water are cheap, but dirt on goods is 
expensive." A tidy department means 
tidy employes. 

This company desires to advance the 
interests of its employes. Do not hesitate 
to appeal to the manager. Reasonable 
requests will always be attended to. 

A shut mouth will not catch flies. 

What goes on in this factory should not 
be the subject of outside gossip. You would 
not like it in regard to your own affairs. 

The company's success depends largely 
upon the cordial cooperation of its em- 
ployes. 

Let us not speak ill of our fellow worker. 
If we cannot say something kind it is better 
to keep our mouths shut. 

Human sympathy is the brightness of 
life. A kindly look and a friendly word 
may send a fellow toiler on his way rejoic- 
ing. 

Politeness does not cost anything. 

Not " what is my due," but " what is my 
duty." 

All that we expect of you is to do your 
best. 

Weeks are made of days, days of hours, 
hours of minutes. 

It is worry, not work, that kills. 

Measure with a rule, not with your thumb. 



Sixteen ounces make a pound. Give it 
every time and take it too. 

Never misrepresent goods made by this 
company. Brown sugar goods are not 
made from white sugar. 

Don't run down your competitor. He 
may make and sell as good goods as your 
own. 

We would like you to speak of this com- 
pany, while in its employ, as our company, 
if you feel that you are of it and with it. 

If you can suggest any improvement in 
the manufacture or packing of goods, or in 
the mode of doing any work, don't think 
that it is not worth mentioning. Every 
suggestion will be considered, and if of 
value to the company, you will be rewarded. 

Our success depends upon your using 
your brains as well as your hands. We 
need your best thoughts. 

When you remember that you are hand 
ling products which enter into the daily bill 
of fare of thousands of people, you will be 
as careful and as cleanly as if you were 
preparing the food for your own table. 

If you see any material that is not strictly 
first class, reject it. The company relies 
upon you to carefully guard its interests in 
even small matters. A soiled biscuit or 
piece of confectionery may be the means of 
our losing a good customer. 

The company will ask as little work 
after regular hours as possible, but when 
demanded by the necessities of business, a 
willing and hearty response will be appre- 
ciated. 

A "Suggestion Box " has been put up in 
the warehouse near the timeboard. Any 
employe who has a suggestion to in make 
the way of putting up goods ; the making 
of new lines, or any suggestion by which 
the company can be benefitted the company 
will pay for it. Write your thoughts on a 
slip of paper, sign your name and the 
department in which you work, enclose it in 
an envelope and drop it in the box. The 
box will be opened twice each month and if 
the suggestion is a good one you will be 
rewarded. 



A NEW MANUFACTURERS' AGENCY. 

Mr. Geo. Hilton, Winnipeg, is in T° 
ronto. He has been travelling in Manitoba 
and the Northwest the past seven or eight 
years, but he is now going into the manu 
facturers' agency business, and the object 
of his visit to the east is to secuie clients. 
His firm, he says, will be prepared to 
guarantee accounts. 



Caroline V. Bloomfield lias registered as 
proprietress of -I. II. Andrews & Co., gen- 
eral merchants, Bishop's Crossing, Que. 



DIAMOND 
GRAPHITE 
PAINT 



The very best coveting and ANTI-RUST 
Paint for all Metallic structures. 



THE 



CANADA 

PAINT 

COMPANY 

LIMITED 

MONTREAL 



GRAPHITE 



For MACHINES, 
BRIDGES and 
GIRDERS 

Resists 

Corrosion 

and gives a beautiful finish. The IDEAL 

Paint for economy and durability. 

Correspondence invited. 



THE 



CANADA 

PAINT 

COMPANY 

LIMITED 

TORONTO 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



15 



SUCCESSFUL COUNTRY STORES. 



AS the big department stores multiply 
and flourish in the large trade 
centres, and as cut-price stores 
increase in number, the question naturally 
recurs : What are the chances lor the main- 
tenance of the country general store ? 

One thing is certain, says The Store- 
keeper, that country retailers agree that it 
is more difficult to do a profitable business 
now than in former years, owing, not alone 
to increased competition, but also to smaller 
individual purchases than in earlier years. 
The tendency , becoming stronger each year. 
is to buy for immediate requirements, and 
added to this, is the speedy, ready access to 
the larger, distant store — rendering it 
absolutely necessary to show the greatest 
appreciation of the minor orders and fill 
them with quite as much pleasure as they 
were formerly wont to do with the large 
orders. This attention is not only necessary 
but will pay in the manifested appreciation 
of customers. 

The country stores, conducted on the 
same principles that draw trade to the city 
departmental stores, will continue to do a 
profitable business despite all the efforts put 
forth by the largest city emporiums or 
greatest of cut price establishments. All 
that is necessary is to work as hard and 
perseveringly towards the turnover of goods. 
City clerks, managers and buyers are con- 
stantly being urged to greater extremes in 
judicious advertising, closer buying and 
greater attention to details, including the 
preference of customers, thus keeping inter- 
est constantly aroused. During this time 
not two out of every 10 country stores are 
putting forth the slightest extra effort at 
pushing sales', extending trade, arousing 
interest in the business by judicious adver- 
tising, or even displays, beyond the regular 
routine. 

It may safely be said, and it could readily 
be proven, that in any township in Michi- 
gan where a good farming community 
exists, a good general store could be started 
in addition to the number already there.and 
do a prosperous business from the start. 
Where would this store get its trade ? It 
would draw partly from the other stores 
near by and partly from the custom now 
going to the larger centres. The greater 
efforts put forth, and the greater genuine 
inducements offered, which should be done 
as well in the village as in the city, the 
greater would the trade be enjoyed. It 
would require hard work and greater efforts 
to sustain ; but why should a man expect to 
win out with less energy if doing business in 
the country than if doing business in the 
city, where he would be compelled to move 
fast or be run over \ If he could, all a man 



need to do in" order to have a "snap" 
would be to move out of town. The country 
merchants who have made a success of the 
general merchandise business are those who 
can retail no such " snap " as might be in- 
ferred as existing prior to the days of cut- 
price stores in the cities. Judicious and 
frequent buying in small lots, permitting no 
old, unsalable goods to hold a place on the 
shelves, no old, questionable accounts kept 
alive on the books, nor any new, question- 
able accounts to be opened, are among the 
resolves of these wide-awake dealers, who 
go ahead from decade to decade paying 
iooc. on the dollar and gradually acquiring 
their own houses and, perhaps, a nearby 
farm as a source of additional revenue and 
satisfaction. As the dwellers of the country 
become acquainted with the ways of city 
stores they will become better customers of 
the first class country store, if its owners but 
insist on keeping its prices, bargains and 
goods before the public with the same de- 
termination shown by the city merchants. 
The latter can never expect to gain quite 
the same confidence of their out-of-town 
customers as the conscientious, enterprising 
dealer in their midst. 



RINGING UP BY PROXY. 

Scene — Manager's office in Jones' factory. 

Jones — " Croney ! Ring up Mr. Johnson, 
of Johnson & Co., wholesalers, and tell him 
I want to speak to him." 

Croney (aged 15)— "Side track 1234. 
Hello. Is Mr. Johnson in ? May I speak 
to him, please ? (Pause). Is that Mr. 
Johnson ? A minute please. Mr. Jones 
would like to speak to you." 

"Mr. Jones, Mr. Johnson is at the 
phone." 

Jones — " Very well. Ask him to wait a 
minute." 

Scene changes to Johnson's office. 

Office Boy — " Mr. Johnson ! Mr. Jones 
would like to speak to you at the phone." 

(Mr. Johnson goes to the phone). 

Johnson — " Hello ! is that Mr. "Jones." 

(Then follows the above conversation, and Jones is 
asked to wait a " minute." He waits. He waits 10 
seconds, and becomes restless. He waits 3J seconds and 
by that time is wrathy and foaming at the mouth. 
Finally comes the ans i er. ) 

Jones — "Heho Mr. Johnson. Sorry to 
keep you waiting, but I was very busy. 
Say, I have some more of that last size of 
our brand run off, and I thought, perhaps, 
I could sell you some. They turned out 
well." 

Johnson (in a rage)—" Do you fancy 
that you are the only man in town that is 

busy? Keep your old goods." Hangs 

up the phone. 

Jones then begins to wonder why. Here's 
why : 



i. He should have gone to the phone 
himself, instead of sending his boy. 

2. He should have known that by 
asking a man to keep the telephone at his 
ear 30 seconds he is giving him an hour's 
trouncing. 

3. He was asking Johnson to return good 
for evil, and men who comply are as scarce 
as hen's teeth. 



INQUIRIES REGARDING CANADIAN 
TRADE. 

Mr. Harrison Watson, curator of the 
Canadian Section of the Imperial Institute, 
London, England, is in receipt of the follow- 
ing inquiries : 

1. A Johannesburg house asks for names of 
Canadian producers of evaporated vegetables. 

2. A firm of manufacturing chemists asks to be 
placed in communication with Canadian shippers 
of talc and mica schist, ar.d also of mica in sheets, 
not split, as it comes from the mine. 

3. A Liverpool house wishes for names of Cana- 
dian producers of asbestos. 

The following were among the recent 
inquiries relating to Canadian trade 
received at the High Commissioner's office 
in London, England : 

4. A German firm, having experience of the 
trade is open to negotiate with Canadian wood 
pulp manufacturers with a view to representing 
them on the continent. 

5. A correspondent asks for addresses of some 
large hog-killing firms in Canada. 

6. A gentleman recently from Canada, well 
acquainted with the requirements of the country, 
would like to recommend a very well-established 
agent there to handle draperies, etc. 

7. Inquiry i; made by an agent established at 
Ghent for names of Canadian firms desiring repre- 
sentation in Belgium. 

8. Another inquiry has been received for names 
of Canadian shippers of boxwood, shipped in the 
flat, ready to be put together by the purchaser. 

[The names of the firms or individuals 
making the above inquiries will be fur- 
nished on application to the Editor of 
Hardware and Metal. 



SEEN ON A LETTER HEAD. 

Lives of wealthy men remind us 
That by using " printers' ink," 

We can die and leave behind us 
Monstrous piles of " golden chink." 



CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC 

A HARDWARE CATALOGUE 

A new hardware catalogue has just been 
issued by H. S. Howland, Sons & Co. It 
is known as No. 12, and is intended to be 
used in conjunction with cutlery catalogue 
No. 11. It consists of nearly 400 pages and 
is nicely indexed and illustrated. The com- 
pleteness of the illustrations may be gathered 
from the fact that there are over 4,200 of 
them. 

Those in the trade who have not yet 
received a copy of the catalogue will be 
supplied on application to the firm. 



16 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




QUEBEC MARKETS 

Montreal, July 12, 1901. 
HARDWARE. 

BUSINESS during the past week has 
been encouraging, the number of 
letter orders to hand being quite 
large. Wires are, as yet, none too plen- 
tiful, while wire nails continue decidedly 
scarce. The demand for nails continues to 
total a large volume, and the mills find 
difficulty in keeping up with orders at a 
season when they are generally accumu- 
lating stocks. There is also a brisk demand 
for hay-fork rope, and Ji and 1 in. are hard 
to obtain. Shot is now beginning to move, 
as well as other sporting goods, but there is 
little activity yet. Hay-baling wire must 
soon be wanted. One of the chief features 
of the week has been the advance of 2c. 
per lb. in the price of paris green, which 
has been actively called for. Churns and 
wringers remain exceedingly scarce, and 
the manufacturers are some weeks behind 
with their shipments. Freezers and refriger- 
ators are none too plentiful. English chain 



is advancing. Linseed oil is advancing for 
October shipment, and all signs indicate 
that we shall see a continued high market 
all through the fall. In New York, oil is 
worth $ 1 per Imperial gallon. 

Barb Wire — There is now some sur- 
plus wire on the market, and supplies may 
be obtained for immediate shipment. There 
is still a fair demand reported. The price 
is unchanged at $3 05 per 100 lb. f.o.b. 
Montreal. 

Galvanized Wire — Trade is somewhat 
slacker, but small shipments are still being 
made. We quote: No. 5, #4.25 ; Nos. 
6. 7 and 8 gauge, $3.55; No. 9, $3.10; 
No. 10, $3.75 ; No. 11, $3.85 ; No. 12, 
$3.25; No. 13, $3.35; No. 14, $4-21;; No. 
15. $4-75; No. 16. 85. 

Smooth Steel Wire — The mills report 
trade this spring to have been quite heavy, 
the oiled and annealed wire having success- 
fully competed with the imported galvanized. 
The trade in hay-baling wire is commenc- 
ing. We quote oiled and annealed : No. 
9, $2.80; No. 10, 82.87; No. 11, 82.90; No. 



12, 82.95; No. 13, 83 15 pc 100 lb. f.o.b. 
Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton, London, St. 
John and Halifax. 

Fine Steel Wire — No change has 
transpired this week, the discount remaining < 
at 17^ per cent. 

Brass and Copper Wire — There is 
nothing new to report. A steady demand 
is reported. The discounts are 55 and 2^ 
per cent, on brass, and 50 and i% per cent, 
on copper. 

Fence Staples — A small trade is pass- 
ing. We quote: 8325 for bright, and 83-75 
for galvanized, per keg of 100 lb. 

Wire Nails — The demand continues 
brisk and goods scarce. None of the mills 
have any stocks, while some are behind in 
their shipments. The market is firm. We 
quote: 82.85 for small lots and 82.77 >£ 
for carlots, f. o. b. Montreal, London, 
Toronto, Hamilton and Gananoque. 

Cut Nails — The demand for cut nails is 
only fair, shingle nails continuing the most 
active size. We quote : 82 45 for small 
and 82.35 for carlots ; fl6ur barrel nails, 25 




Sunshine 
Furnaces. 



Are you taking advantage of the many- 
new buildings being built in your town 

to sell "Sunshine" Furnaces? 

It will pay you to call on each builder 
and tell him all about this perfect furnace. 
He'll likely buy, and you'll make money 
out of it, as well as making him a lasting 
friend. 

Write for advertising matter and com- 
plete information about the "SUNSHINE." 

The McGiary Mfg. Co. 



Hi 



\L, Wl 



LONDON, TORONTO/* 1 MONTREAL, WINNIPEG, 
VANCOUVER and ST. JOHN, N.B. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



17 



THE PACEHERSEY 

IRON & TUBE CO. 



Limited 



Montreal 



Man ufacturers of j 



A 



Wrought Iron Pipe 

For Water, Gas, Steam, Oil, 
Ammonia and Machinery. 



DRAIN PIPES, 
PORTLAND CEMENTS, 
FIRE BRICKS AND CLAY 
SILICA AND MAGNESIA 
BRICKS, 

with specially prepared mortar. 

Contractors' and Pounders' 
Supplies. 



F. HYDE & CO. 



31 WELLINGTON ST., MONTREAL 



. . FULL STOCK 



Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWIrOT! 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

the CANADIAN SEWER PIPE CO. 

HAMILTON, OHT. TORONTO, ONT. 

ST. JOHNS, QUE. 



Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers of 



Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND "DESERONTO." 

Especially adaDted for C.ir Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery where g eat strength 
* requireo. ; Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



per cent, discount ; coopers' nails, 30 per 
cent, discount. 

Horse Nails— A fair demand for horse 
nails is reported; the prices are now steady. 
*'C" brand is held at a discount of 50 
and 7 y z per cent, off the new list. 
" M " brand is quoted at 60 per cent, 
off old list on oval and city head and 66% 
percent, off countersunk head. Monarch's 
discount is 66;/J per cent., and 70 per cent. 
in 25 box lots. 

Horseshoes — There has not been 
much inquiry for horseshoes this 
week. We quote as follows : Iron 
shoes, light and medium pattern, No. 
2 and larger, S3. 50; No. 1 and smaller, 
$3-75 ; .snow shoes, No. 2 and larger, 
$3.75 ; No. 1 and smaller, $4.00 ; X L 
steel shoes, all sizes, 1 to 5, No. 2 and 
larger, S3. 60 ; No. 1 and smaller, $3.85 ; 
feather-weight, all sizes, $4.85; toe weight 
steel shoes, all sizes, $5.95 f.o.b. Montreal; 
f.o.b. Hamilton, London and Guelph, 10c. 
extra. 

Poultry Netting — This line has become 
uninteresting, not much being done in it this 
week. We quote 50 and 10 per cent, off 
list A and 50 and 5 per cent, off lists B, C 
andD. 

Green Wire Cloth — The activity is still 
the striking feature of this line, but the de- 
mand is hardly as good as last week. We 
quote $ 1. 35. 

Screen Doors and Windows — Some 
small orders are to hand. We quote: Screen 
doors, plain cherry finish, $7.30 per doz.; 
do. fancy, $U-5° per doz.; walnut, $7.30 
per doz., and yellow, $7 45; windows, $2.25 
to $3 50 per doz. 

Screws — The demand is fully up to the 
mark. Discounts are : Flat head 
bright, 87 >£ and 10 per cent, off list; 
round head bright, 82 >£ and 10 percent.; 
flat head brass, 80 and 10 per cent.; round 
head brass, 75 and 10 per cent. 

Bolts — Asa general rule the trade is a sort 
ing one. Discounts are : Norway carriage 
bolts, 65 per cent. ; common, 60 per cent.; 
machine bolts, 60 per cent. ; coach screws, 
70 per cent. ; sleigh shoe bolts, 72^ per 
cent.; blank bolts, 70 per cent.; bolt ends, 
62 j£ percent.; plough bolts, 60 percent.; 
tire bolts, 67^ per cent.; stove bolts, 67 >£ 
per cent. To any retailer an extra discount 
of 5 per cent, is allowed. Nuts, square, 4c. 
per lb. off list ; hexagon nuts, 4X C > P er lb- 
off list. To all retailers an extra discount of 
j(c, per lb. is allowed. 

Building Paper — Building papers are 
in fair request. We quote as follows : 
Tarred felt, $1.70 per 100 lb.; 2 -ply ready 
roofing, 80c. per roll ; 3-ply, $1.05 per roll; 
carpet felt, $2.25 per 100 lb.; dry sheath- 
ing, 30c. per roll ; tar sheathing, 40c. 
per roll ; dry fibre, 50c. per oil tarred fibre, 



CANADA PLATES, 

Half Bright. 

Russia iRON,°;z , :.'i. , :. d 

INGOT TIN, KL'nd f." 
SHEET ZINC, " v 



M." 



In stock at Montreal. Low prices to 
wholesale trade. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 

MONTREAL. 



IRON AND 
BRASS 



Pumps 



Force, Lift and Cistern 
Hand and Power , 

For all duties. We can 
supply your wants with 
— quality the best and 
prices right. Catalogues 
and full information for a 
request. 



THE R. McDOUGALL CO., Limited 




Manufacturers, 



Gait. Canada. 



ADAM HOPE & CO. 

Hamilton. Ont. 



We have in stock 



PIG- TIN 
INGOT COPPER 
LAKE COPPER 
PIG LEAD 
SPELTER 
ANTIMONY 

WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS. 

Nova Scotia Steel Go. 

Limited 

HEW GLASGOW, M.S. 

Manufacturers of 

Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIBMENS MARTIN 

Open Hearth Steel 



18 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



If you are looking for a high-grade 
Finish for floors 

Granitine [ loof , 

^^= Finish 



is unsurpassed in durability and beauty of finish for natural 
wood and parquette floors, linoleums, oil cloth, cork matting, 
etc. Its transparency reveals the grain of the wood and its 
preserving qualities increase the life of the floor. 

It is easier applied, more durable, makes better finish than 
wax preparations, and is free from all 

Unpleasant Slippcriness. 

Moving furniture or boot heels do not leave white marks, 
nor does soap, mud or water destroy its fine appearance. 

SEND FOR SAMPLE ORDER. 



MANUFACTURED ONLY BY 



1 Imperial Varnish & Color Co. 



TORONTO, ONT., CANADA. 



LIMITED 



Binder Twine Binder Twine 



The John Bowman 
Hardware & Coal Co., 

London, Ont. 

Write us for close prices on 
best quality American 
Binder Twine. 

Binder Twine Binder Twine 



6oc. per roll ; O.K. and I.X.L., 65c. per 
roll ; heavy straw sheathing, $28 per ton ; 
slaters' felt, 50c. per roll. 

Rivets and Burrs — A small trade is 
being done. Discounts are as follows 
on best iron rivets, section, carriage, 
and wagon box, black rivets, tinned do., 
coopers' rivets and tinned swedes rivets, 
60 and 10 per cent.; swedes iron burrs 
are quoted at 55 per cent, off; copper 
rivets, 35 and 5 percent, off; and coppered 
iron rivets and burrs, in 5-lb. carton 
boxes, are quoted at 60 and 10 per cent, 
off list. 

Binder Twine — Binder twine has moved 
in large quantities this week. The market 
is quite firm. We quote as follows : 
Blue Ribbon, nj£c. ; Red Cap, gtfc. ; 
Tiger, 8^c; Golden Crown, 8c; Sisal, 
8tfc. 

Cordage — There has been a good trade 
done in cordage again this week, particularly 
in hay fork sizes; in fact, y% and 1 inch are 
out of stock in many instances and hard to 
get. Manila is worth I3>£c. per lb. for 
7-16 and larger ; sisal brings 10c. and lath- 
yarn, 10c. 

Harvest Tools — All kinds of goods used 
in harvesting are in keen request. The 
discount is 50, 10 and 5 per cent. 

Spades and Shovels — There is not a 



great deal being done in this line The dis- 
count is 40 and 5 per cent. 

Lawn Mowers — The movement in this 
line is nearly over for the season. We quote: 
High wheel, 50 and 5 per cent. f.o.b. Mont- 
real; low wheel, in all sizes, $2.75 each 
net ; high wheel, 11 -inch, 30 per cent. off. 

Firebricks — Trade is slow and feature- 
less. We quote : Scotch at % 17. 50 to #22 
and English at $17 to $21 per 1,000 ex 
wharf. 

Cement — The demand has improved, 
and this week a fair business has been done. 
We quote : German cement, $2.35 to 
$2.50; English, $2.25 to $2.35 ; Belgian, 
Si. 70 to $1.95 per bbl. ex wharf, and 
American, $2.30 to $2.45, ex cars. 

METALS. 

The iron market is not in a very satisfac. 
tory condition, pig iron being rather dull 
and wrought scrap being easy also. The 
local sheet metal market is quite firm with 
black sheets. Canada plate and terne plates 
are quite scarce. In England prices are well 
maintained on black sheets, Canada plate 
and galvanized iron, while it remains im- 
possible to get early deliveries of certain 
lines. The rapid advance in London of 
the price of ingot tin will, no doubt, 
strengthen the tinplate market. 

Pig Iron — Business in pig iron is quite 



slack, and the prices are in buyers' favor. 
We quote No. 1 Summerlee at #20 to $20.50 
and No. 1 Canadian at $17.50 to $18 per 
ton. 

Bar Iron — Business in bar iron is quite 
brisk. Prices are $2 per ton higher this 
week, and dealers are now asking $1.85 for 
merchants' bar and $2 for horseshoe. 

Black Sheets — The market is firm, 
supplies are scarce, and the demand is 
rather brisk. We quote : 8 to 16 gauge, 
$2.50 to $2 60 ; 26 gauge, $2.55 to $2.65, 
and 28 gauge, $2 60 to $2.70. 

Galvanized Iron — The market shows 
no particular change. The demand is good 
and the markets are in good shape. Ameri- 
can goods are almost unprocurable for 
early fall delivery, and it is said that Eng- 
lish brands are reaping a rich harvest. 
We quote as follows : No. 28 Queen's 
Head, $4.. 50 ; Apollo, 10^ oz., $4.50, and 
Comet, $4 30, with a 10c reduction for case 
lots. 

Copper — The market is steady at 17^ 
to 1 8c 

Ingot Tin — The bulls of London have 
succeeded in cornering the tin market and 
in advancing the price ,£10 per ton. It is 
now quoted at ^140. Lamb and Flag is 
worth 33 to 34c on the local market. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



19 



Lead — A fair business is being done at 
$3 75 P er IO ° lb- 

Lead Pipe — The demand is up to the 
average. We quote : 7c. for ordinary and 
7%c. for composition waste, with 30 per 
cent. off. 

Iron Pipe — The manufacturers have 
advanced prices on pipe this week. The 
market is strong, as also is the demand. 
We quote as follows : Black pipe, }&, S3 
I per 100 ft.; ^. $3; y 2 , $3 05 ; %, $3.30; 
i-in., $4-75: 1 X. $6.45; 1%, $7.7$; 
2-in. $10 35. Galvanized, %, $4.60; %, 
$5.25; 1 in., $7-So; itf, $9.80; i\i, 
$11.75 I 2-in., $16. 

Tinplates — In sympathy with the 
marked advance in pig tin values in tin- 
plates are quite firm. We quote : Coke 
plates, $3.75 to $4'. charcoal, $4.25 to #4. 50; 
extra quality, $5 to $5.10. 

Canada Plate — Stocks are light and 
the demand fairly brisk. We quote : 52's, 
$2.45; 60' s, $2.55; 75 : s, $2.60 ; full 
polished, $3, and galvanized, $3.90. 

Steel — Unchanged. We quote : Sleigh- 
shoe, $1.95 ; tire, $2 ; bar, $1.95; spring, 
$2.75 ; machinery, $2.75, and toe-calk, 
$2.50. 

Sheet Steel — We quote : Nos. 22 and 
24, $3. and Nos. 18 and 20, $2.85. 

Tool Steel— Black Diamond, 8c. and 
Jessop's, 13c. 

Terne Plates — The tone of the market 
is steady and healthy. The demand is fair 
and stocks small. The selling price is $7. 50. 

Coil Chain — The English market is 
somewhat higher. We understand there 
has been a good deal of buying done quite 
recently. We quote: No. 6, 11 J^c; No. 5, 
IOC.; No. 4, 9J£c; No. 3, 9c; #-inch, 
7^c. per lb.*; 5-16, $4.85 ; 5-16 exact, 
$5-3o; H.UAo; 7-16, $4.20; >£, $3.95; 
9-16, $3.85; %, $3-55; ^- $3-45 ; ft. 
S3. 40 ; i-in., $3.35. In carload lots an 
allowance of 10c. is made. 

Sheet Zinc — The prices are irregular 
from $5 75 to #6.21;. 

Antimony — Quiet, at 10c. 

Zinc Spelter — Is worth 5c, 

Solder — We quote : Bar solder, 18 {£c; 
wire solder, 20c. 

GLASS. 

The situation in glass is unchanged. The 
demand is regular. We quote as follows : 
First break, $2. 10; second, $2.20 for 
50 ieet ; first break, 100 feet, $3.90 ; 
second, $4.10; third, S4.60; fourth, $4.85; 
fifth, $5.35 ; sixth, 5585, and seventh, 
86.35. 
4» PAINTS AND OILS. 

Trade is fully up to the average for the 
season, although not as brisk as it was some 
weeks ago. Paris green is exceedingly 
active, and what stocks there are left are 



demanding a 2c. per lb. premium. Linseed 
oil is steady in England for spot goods, but 
for forward delivery it shows a decided 
upward tendency, £2 being the amount of 
the rise within the last week on October oil. 
Forward prices are rapidly approaching spot 
values. We quote : 

White Lead — Best brands, Government 
standard, $6.25 ; No. 1, $5.87^ ; No. 2, 
$5.50; No. 3, $5.12^, and No. 4, $4.75 
all f.o.b. Montreal. Terms, 3 per cent, cash 
or four months. 

Dry White Lead — $5.25 in casks ; 
kegs, $5.50. 

Red Lead — Casks, $5 00 ; in kegs, 
$5-25- 

Dry White Zinc — Pure, dry, 6^c; No. 
1, 5#c; in oil, pure, 7%c; No. 1, 6^c; 
No. 2, 5X C - 

Putty — Wequote : Bulk, in barrels, $1.90 
per 100 lb.; bulk, in less quantity, $2.05 ; 
bladders, in barrels, $2.10; bladders, in 
100 or 200 lb. kegs or boxes, $2.25; in tins, 
$2.55 to $2.65 ; in less than 100-lb. lots, 
$3 f.o.b. Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, 
Hamilton, London and Guelph. Maritime 
Provinces 10c. higher, f.o.b. St. John and 
Halifax. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 83c; boiled, 86c. 
in 5 to 9 bbls., ic. less, 10 to 20 bbl. lots, 
open, net cash, plus 2c. for 4 months. 
Delivered anywhere in Ontario between 
Montreal and Oshawaat 2c. per gal. advance 
and freight allowed. 

Turpentine — Single bbls., 55c; 2 to 4 
bbls., 54c; 5 bbls. and over, open terms, 
the same terms as linseed oil. 

Mixed Paints— $1.20 to #1.45 per gal. 

Castor Oil — 8^ to 9^c. in wholesale 
lots, and y£c. additional for small lots. 

Seal Oil — 47 >£ to 49c. 

Cod Oil — 32% to 35c. 

Naval Stores — We quote : Resins, 
$2.75 to $4 50, as to brand ; coal tar, S3. 25 
to $3 75 ; cotton waste, \]/ 2 to 5j£c. for 
colored, and 6 to 7%c. for white ; oakum, 
5^ to dy%c, and cotton oakum, 10 to 11c. 

Paris Green — Petroleum barrels, i8^c. 
per lb.; arsenic kegs, 19c; 50 and 100- 
lb. drums, 19^0.; 25-lb. drums, 20c; lib- 
packages, 20 %c.\ >£-lb. packages, 22 y£c.\ 
i-lb. tins, 2i^c; ^ -lb. tins, 23^c. f.o.b. 
Montreal; terms 3 percent. 30 days, or four 
months from date of delivery. 

SCRAP METALS. 

The iron market is rather easy, although 
as yet, quotations are not chinged. Dealers 
are now paying the following prices in the 
country: Heavy copper and wire, 13 }£ to 14c. 
per lb. ;light copper, 1 2 to 1 2 j£c. ;heavy brass, 
12 to i2^c. ; heavy yellow, 8^ to 9c; light 
brass, 6% to 7c; lead, 2^ to 2^c. per lb.; 
zinc, 2% to 2^c. ; iron, No. 1 wrought, $14 
to $16 per gross ton f.o.c. Montreal; No. 5 




A handsome steel .siding for all 
kindsofbuildingpurposes; supplied 
either Galvanized or Painted. 

OUR ROCK FACED STONE 

is fire and damp proof — resists all 
weather conditions — is very rea- 
sonably priced — ■ and can be so 
easily applied it gives universal 
satisfaction. 

Find further facts about it in our 
catalog. 

Metallic Roofing Co., Limited, 

Wholesale Manufacturers, 
Toronto, - - Canada. 



■ 



cast, Si 3 to Si 4; stove plate, S8 to S9; light 
iron, No. 2, S4 a ton; malleable and steel, 
S4'. rags, country, 60 to 70c. per 100 lb.; old 
rubbers, 6% to 7%c. per lb. 
HIDES. 
Dealers are paying J^c. per lb. more for 
green hides this week. Lambskins are 5c. 
higher. The quality of skins coming 
forward is improving. We quote as fol- 
lows : Light hides, 7c. for No. 1; 6c. for 
No. 2, and 5c. for No. 3. Lambskins, 
15c; sheepskins, 90c. to $1 ; calfskins, 
10c. for No. 1 and 8c. for No. 2. 



notes. 
Bar iron is 10c. per 100 lb. higher. 
English coil chain is reported a little 
higher. 

Iron pipe has been advanced by manu- 
facturers. 

It is doubtful whether there has been 
enough paris green made to supply the 
demand. 



ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Toronto, July 13, 1901. 
HARDWARE. 

MIDSUMMER quietness is beginning 
to creep upon the wholesale hard- 
ware and allied trades, and the 
travellers are beginning to take their holi- 
days. But there is, nevertheless, a nice 
trade still being done. And with the crop 
conditions on the whole favorable through- 
out the country, the promises for the fall 
trade are bright. Probably the most un- 
satibfactory feature of trade is the slowness 
of payments from British Columbia, where 



20 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



the trade conditions at the moment are 
not good. The most active line in 
the hardware trade at the moment 
is harvest tools, orders for which 
are urgent. A good trade is to be noted 
in wire nails, and a nice business for 
this time of the year is being done in fence 
wires. For sprayers, there is quite an 
active demand. In oil stoves, the demand 
still exceeds the supply. Stocks of refriger- 
ators are almost cleaned up, and very few 
ice cream freezers are on hand. 

Barb Wire — There is still a nice steady 
trade being done. The demand usually falls 
off at this time of the year, but it is not, 
perhaps, as perceptible as usual. We quote: 
$3 °5 P er IO ° 1°- f rom stock Toronto ; and 
%i.%zyi f.o.b. Cleveland for less than car- 
lots, and $2.70 for carlots. 

Galvanized Wire— Practically the same 
remarks apply to plain galvanized wire as to 
barb wire, the demand being rather belter 
than usual at this time of the year. We 
quote : Nos. 6, 7 and 8, #3.50 to $3.85 
per 100 lb., according to quantity ; No. 9, 
$2.85 to $3.15 ; No. 10, $3.60 to $3.95 ; 
No. 11, $3.70 to %\ 10 ; No. 12, $3 to 
$3.30; No. 13. $3.10 to $3.40 ; No. 14, 
$4. 10 to $4 50 ; No. 15. U4.60 to $5.05 : 
No. 16, $4.85 to $5.35. Nos. 6 to 9 base 
f.o.b. Cleveland are quoted at $2.57^ in 
less than carlots and 12c. less for carlots of 
15 tons. 

Smooth Steel Wire — There is still a 
good demand for oiled and annealed wire, 
and there is a good deal of hay-baling wire 
moving. Net selling prices for oiled and 
annealed are as follows : Nos. 6 to 8, $2.90; 
9, $2.80; 10, #2.87 ; 11, $2.90 ; 12, $2.95; 

13. $315; J 4. $3-37; 15. $3-5°; l6 . 
$3.65. Delivery points, Toronto, Hamilton, 
London and Montreal, with freights equal- 
ized on those points. 

Wire Nails — The demand continues 
good, and, in some sizes, particularly shingle 
nails, it is difficult to fill orders promptly. 
The base price is still ^2 85 for less than 
carlots, and $ 2. 77^ for carlots. Delivery 
points Toronto, Hamilton, London, Ganan- 
oque and Montreal. 

Cut Nails — There is a good demand for 
cut nails for shingling purposes. Otherwise 
there is only a moderate business being 
done. The base price is $2.45 per keg for 
less than carlots, and $2.35 for carlots. 
Delivery points : Toronto, Hamilton, 
London, Montreal and St. John, N.B. 

Horse Nails— Very little is being done, 
and jobbers report that prices are some- 
what demoralized. Discount on "C" 
brand, oval head, 50 and j% per cent, 
off new list, and on "M" and other 
brands, 50, 10 and 5 per cent, off the old 
list. Countersunk head 60 per cent. 



Horseshoes— Jobbers also report that 
prices are demoralized in this line, while 
trade, as is usual at this time of the year, is 
quiet. We quote : f.o.b. Toronto : Iron 
shoes, No. 2 and larger, light, medium and 
heavy, S3. 60 ; snow shoes, $3.85 ; light 
steel shoes, $3.70; featherweight (all sizes), 
#4.95; iron shoes, No. 1 and smaller, light, 
medium and heavy (all sizes), $3.85 ; snow 
shoes, $4 ; light steel shoes, $3.95; feather- 
weight (all sizes), $4.95. 

Screws — A nice steady trade is still 
being done. Discounts are: Flat head bright, 
87 j£ and 10 per cent. ; round head 
bright, 82 )£ and 10 per cent.; flat head 
brass, 80 and 10 per cent.; round head brass, 
75 and 10 per cent. ; round head bronze, 
65 per cent., and flat head bronze at 70 
per cent. 

Rivets and Burrs— Business continues 
fair and prices unchanged. We quote : 
Iron rivets, 60 and 10 per cent.; iron 
burrs, 55 per cent.; copper rivets and 
burrs, 25 and 5 per cent. 

Bolts and Nuts — Trade continues ac- 
tive in bolts and nuts and prices 
firm. We quote : Carriage bolts (Nor- 
way), full square, 65 per cent.; carriage 
bolts full square, 65 per cent. ; common 
carriage bolts, all sizes, 60 per cent. ; 
machine bolts, all sizes, 60 per cent. ; coach 
screws, 70 per cent. ; sleighshoe bolts, 72 j£ 
per cent. ; blank bolts, 60 per cent. ; bolt 
ends, 62)4 per cent.; nuts, square, 4c. off; 
nuts, hexagon, 4J£c. off; tire bolts, 67% 
per cent.; stove bolts, 67 y£ ; plough bolts, 
60 per cent. ; stove rods, 6 to 8c. 

Rope — The demand for rope is still 
decidedly brisk and in %i and i-inch sizes 
for hay-fork purposes there is not enough 
to supply the demand. The rope trade so 
far this season is larger than has been ex- 
perienced for a long time. The base price 
for sisal is unchanged at 10c, and for 
manila 13 J^c. is still quoted. 

Binder Twine — There is not a great 
deal doing yet, the sorting-up trade not 
having yet begun. Prices are firm. We 
quote : Pure manila, 650 ft., 12c; manila, 
600 ft., 9^c. ; mixed, 550 ft., 8%c; mixed, 
500 ft., 8 to 8#c. 

Sporting Goods — There is a good 
demand. Shipments of loaded shells, for 
which quite a number of orders have been 
booked, are arriving. The Cartridge Asso- 
ciation in the United States have notified 
the trade here of an advance in the price 
of empty shells, and they now quote to the 
retail trade from net list to 15 per cent, 
advance on the list price. 

Cutlery — Quite a nice trade is being 
done, principally in pocket knives, knives 
and forks, and spoons. Representatives 
of the flatware manufacturers report an 



OAKEY'S 



The original and only Genuine Pre- 
paration for Cleinin? Cutlery. 
6d. and rs. Canisters. 



WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE POLISH 



JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 

Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. , 

Wellington Hills, London, England. 

Agent : 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL, 



COVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, NY. 

Steel Carriage and 

Wagon Jacks, 

Harness Snaps, Chain, Rope and Web 
Goods, etc. 

FOR SALE BV JOBBERS AT MFRS. PRICES. 



fKlt:5T' < SQLIPPER5 

&*%*e* -^f Lantent Variety. 

^ARE THE BEST. 

Highest CJuAlirj Grooming and 
Sheep Shearing Machine. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

8XKD FOB OATALOOUI TO 
AMtrlaaa Shaarw Mfg. Co., ftanlma, H.H..C8* 





NEWMAN'S PATENT 
INVINCIBLE FLOOR SPRINGS 

Combine all the qualities desirable in a Door Closer 
They work silently and effectually, and never get 
out of order. In use in many of the public build- 
ings throughout Great Britain and the Colonies. 
MAIIE SOLELY BY 

W. NEWMAN & SONS. Birmingham. 



Oneida Community Goods 

HALTERS, COW TIES, SNAPS, etc., etc., 

in all sizes and styles. May be had of all 
jobbers throughout Canada. 

Factory— NIAGARA FALLS, ONT. 



Mackenzie Bros. 

HARDWARE 
MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS, 



Travellers covering Manitoba, 5 WINNIPEG, 
Northwest Territories and \ 
British Columbia. '. MAN. 

correspon dence Solicited. 



THE PULLMAN PNEUMATIC 

Combined 



Door Check 
and Spring. 




for Screen Doors. Small, Simple, Strong, Perfect and 
Ornamental. Lou in Price. 

PULLMAN SASH BALANCE CO.. 

ROCHESTER N.Y., US A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



21 



active trade, the factories being behind 
with their orders. 

Wrought Hooks, Etc. — The jobbing 
trade here have been notified by the manu- 
facturers of wrought hooks and staples and 
hasps and staples of an advance in price 
owing to increased cost of material and 
labor. The advance is about -]]/ z percent. 

Wrought Washers — These are a little 
firmer in price, the discount now being 40 
, per cent, instead of 40 and 50 per cent., as 
' before. 

Enamelled Ware and Tinware — 
There is a fair trade being done in each of 
these lines. 

Oil and Gas Stoves — The trade in oil 
stoves is still active, and, although the 
demand continues good, stocks are nearly 
exhausted. Some houses report that they 
have even had to send out their samples in 
order to fill orders. Trade in gas stoves is 
just moderate. 

Ice Cream Freezers and Refriger- 
ators — Trade continues active. Some of 
the large wholesalers report that they are 
cleaned out entirely of refrigerators, and that 
stocks are getting pretty well reduced in ice 
cream freezers, particularly in the larger 
sizes. 

Green Wire Cloth— This continues to 
go out fairly well at $1.35 per 100 square ft. 

Screen Doors and Windows — Stocks 
are pretty well cleaned up, but as the sea- 
son is getting late, there is no disposition to 
replenish them. We quote as follows : 
Screen doors, 4 in. styles, $7.20 to $7.80 
per doz.; ditto, 3 in. styles, 20c. per doz, 
less ; screen windows, J! 1.60 to $3.60 per 
doz., according to size and extension. 

Building Paper — Trade in this line 
continues good and prices unchanged. We 
quote : Building paper, 30c; tarred paper, 
40c, and tarred roofing, $1.65. 

Poultry Netting — Business is practi- 
cally over for the season. Discount is still 
55 per cent. 

Harvest Tools — The demand for har- 
vest tools is the feature of the trade this 
week. The demand is urgent, and orders 
by telegram, telephone and letter are quite 
frequent. It is expected, before the season 
is over, that stocks in jobbers' hands will 
be pretty well cleaned out. Discount, 50, 
10 and 5 per cent. 

Spades and Shovels — Quite a few 
of these are going out and business is be- 
ginning to pick up in scoops. Discount, 
40 and 5 per cent. 

Eavetrough — A good movement is 
still to be reported in eavetroughs. The rul- 
^ ing price is still S3- 25 per 100 ft. for 10 
inch. 

Specialties — There is quite a demand 
springing up in cherry stoners and fruit 
presses. 




7 FACTORIES 
9 BRANDS 



NICHOLSON FH 




00. 



Providence, R.I., U.S.A. 



BRITISH PLATE GLASS COMPANY, Limited. 



Established 1773 



Manufacturers of Polished, Silvered, Bevelled. Chequered, and Rough Plate Glass. Also 

of a durable, highly-polished material called " MARBLETTE," suitable for Advertising Tablets, Signs, 
Facias, Direction Plates, Clock Faces, Mural Tablets, Tombstones, etc. This is supplied plain, embossed, 

or with incised gilt letters. Benders, Embossers, Brilliant Cutters, etc., etc. Estimates and 

Designs on application. 
Works : Ravenhead, St. Helens, Lancashire. Agencies : 107 Cannon Street, London. E.C —128 Hope Street, Glas- 
gow — 12 East Parade, Leeds, and 36 Par. dise Street, Birmingham. Telegraphic Address: "Glass, St. Helens" 
Telephone No. 68 St. Helens. 

F"OR SALE 



RELAYING RAILS 



STANDARD and LIGHT SECTIONS. 

Subject to inspection. Prompt deliveries. 
For further Information, 

SESSENWEIN BIOS., ' 0I s^on st., MONTREAL 



I STEVENS "oo L s s TEEL j 

! STANDARD FOR QUALITY. | 

f Your stock is not complete without a full line of our Rifles, Shotguns, Pistols, Tools A 

and Victor Bicycles. 
■ Handled by the Leading Jobbers. 9 

[ J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co., p ° il ^ ox Chicopee Falls, Mass., U.S.A. A 



Cement — There is an excellent demand. 
Prices are rather stiff. We quote 
barrel lots as follows : Canadian port- 
land, S2.25 to $2.75; German, #3 to $3. 15 ; 
English, $3; Belgian, #2.50 to $2.75; 
Canadian hydraulic, $1.25 to $1.50. 

METALS. 

The feature of the metal trade has been 
the sharp fluctuations in pig tin on the Lon- 
don market. The metal trade is gradually 
getting quieter, as is usual at this time of 
the year. Prices are a little higher on 
solder, and a lower discount is quoted this 
week on brass. There has been some 
slight readjustment in prices on iron pipe, 
notably i}4, l % and 2-in. sizes. 

Pig Iron — The market continues quiet, 
but fairly steady. We quote : Canadian iron 
on track Toronto at $18 for No. 1, $17.50 
for No. 2, and $17 for No. 3. 

Bar Iron — The firmness which has been 
noted in bar iron has resulted in an advance 
of 5c. by the manufacturers, and jobbers' 
prices are firm at $1.85 to $ 1. go from stock. 

Steel — Business is still brisk in steel and 
prices are fairly steady. We quote as fol- 
lows : Merchantable cast steel, 9 to 15c. per 
lb.; drill steel, 8 to 10c. per lb. ; "B C" and 
"Black Diamond" tool steel, 10 to lie; 



Jessop's, Morton's and Firth's tool steel, 
12^ to 13c; toe calk steel, $2.85 to $3; 
tire steel, $2 30 to $2.50; sleighshoe steel, 
$2. 10 to $2 .25 ; reeled machinery steel, 
$3; hoop steel, $3. 

Galvanized Sheets — There is a good 
trade being done and transactions are 
nearly all now confined to British makes of 
sheets. Some import orders have been 
placed during the week. The ruling 
quotation on 28 gauge is still $4.50 for 
English, and $4.40 for American. 

Black Sheets — Trade is fairly active 
in small lots. We quote : 28 gauge, com- 
mon at $3, and 26 gauge dead flat at $3. 50. 

Canada Plates. — A few orders are being 
booked for importation, but very little is 
being done from stock. We quote all dull, 
$2 90 ; half polished, $3 ; and all bright, 

$3-5°- 

Pig Tin — The fluctuations in the London 
market have been unusually sharp during 
the past week, and have created quite a 
great deal of interest, prices having declined 
_£i2 per ton from the recent lowest point. 
In New York, at the moment, the market is 
also easier, in sympathy with London. On 
the local market there is little or nothing 
new to report. Business has been confined 



22 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



to small sorting up lots, and quotations are 
unchanged at 3 1 % to 32c. 

Tinplates — There are quite a few of 
these going out this week, and latest advices 
from Great Britain report a firm market. 
The ruling price for I. C. is still $4 50, 
although some houses are firm at $4 70. 

Tinned Sheets— There is a little demand 
for small lots, but the season is now about 
over in this line of metals. We still quote 
28 gauge at 8>£c. 

Terne Plates— There has been a little 
more inquiry, but business is small. Trade 
in this line is gradually getting smaller, and 
there is practically only one house in the 
trade which has at the moment any stock. 

Copper— A fair trade is to be noted this 
week in both ingot and sheet copper. We 
quote ingot at I7M" C -. bars at 2 3 t0 2 5 c -- 
sheet at 24 to24j£c, and planished at 32c. 

Brass— The discount has been reduced, 
being now 10 per cent, instead of 15 per 
cent. A fair business is being done. 

Solder — There was quite a good move- 
ment in solder during the past week, and 
quotations are about ic. higher. We quote: 
Half-and-half, guaranteed, 19 y 2 c.\ ditto, 
commercial, 19c; refined, i8^c, and 
wiping, 17c. 

Iron Pipe— There has been some ad- 
justment of prices in \%, \% and 2 inch 
sizes of black pipe; 1 inch pipe is still un- 
changed at $$ .4° per 100 ft.; 1 inch 
galvanized is still quoted at #7-95 P er I0 ° 
ft. Trade is fairly good. 

Lead— A fair business is being done at 

4% t0 4'A C - 

Spelter — Trade is moderate, and local 
quotations are unchanged at 5^ to 6c. 
The ou.side markets are rather easy, and 
the cable quotes a decline of 2s. 6J. in 
London. 

Zinc Sheets — The demand is practi- 
cally nil, and paces are unchanged at 6^c. 
for casks, and 6^c. for part casks. 

Antimony — Trade is quiet, and the rul- 
ing quotation is still 10 >£ to lie. Prices 
rule steady on the outside markets. 
PAINTS AND OILS. 

Paris green is the most active article on 
the list at the moment, and, as stocks in 
manufacturers' hands are light, prices have 
been advanced 2c. per lb. throughout. 
Some jobbers, however, who have large 
stocks on hand, are still selling at last 
week's quotations, or 2C. below the prices 
noted this week. There is a fairly good 
sorting trade in sundries, prepared paints, 
etc., but oil, turpentine and white lead are 
not moving well. We qu^te : 

White Lead — Ex Toronto, pure white 
lead, $6 37^ ; No. 1, $6; No. 2. $5 67^ ; 
No. 3, $5.25; No. 4. $4 87 '£ ; genuine 
dry white lead in casks, $S-37'A- 

Red Lead — Genuine, in casks of 560 lb., 
$5.50; ditto, in kegs of 100 lb., $5.75 ; No. 
1, in casks of 560 lb., $$ ; ditto kegs of 
100 lb., $5 25. 

Litharge — Genuine, 7 to 7j£c. 

Orange Mineral — Genuine, 8 to 8^c. 



White Zinc — Genuine. French V.M., in 
casks, $7 to $7.25; Lehigh, in casks, $6. 

Parjs White — 90c. to $1 per 100 lb. 

Whiting — 70c. per 100 lb. ; Gilders' 
whiting, 80c. 

Gum Shellac — In cases, 22c; in less 
than cases. 25c. 

Paris Green — Bbls., 18%^. ; kegs, 19c; 

50 and 100 lb. drums, \"]%c~ ; 25 lb. drums, 
20c. ;'i lb. papers, 20^c. ; 1 lb. tins, 21 j^c. ; 
yi-Vo. papers, 22^c; J^ -lb. tins, 23j£c. 

Putty — Bladders, in bbls., $2.10; blad- 
ders, in 100 lb. kegs, $2.25; bulk in bbls., 
$1.90 ; bulk, less than bbls. and up to 100 
lb., $2 05 ; bladders, bulk or tins, less than 
100 lb., $2 90. 

Plaster Paris — New Brunswick, $1-90 
per bbl. 

Pumice Stone — Powdered, 82.50 per 
cwt. in bbls., and 4 to 5c. per lb. in less 
quantity ; lump, 10c. in small lots, and 8c. 
in bbls. 

Liquid Paints — Pure, $1.20 to $1.30 per 
gal. 

Castor Oil — East India, in cases, 10 to 
io^c. per lb. and 10^ to 11c. for single 
tins. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 1 to 4 barrels, 84c; 
boiled, 87c; 5 to 9 barrels, raw, 81c. ; 
boiled, 84c, delivered. To Toronto, 
Hamilton, Guelph and London, ic. less. 

Turpentine — Single barrels, 55c; 2 
to 4 barrels, 54c, delivered. Toronto, 
Hamilton and London ic. less. For less 
quantities than barrels, 5c. per gallon extra 
will be added, and for 5 gallon packages, 
50c, and 10 gallon packages, 80c. will be 
charged. 

GLASS. 

The demand fiom stock continues active, 
and, as the shipments to hand have not 
been large enough to cover shortages in 
some sizes, there is considerable diffi- 
culty in filling assorted orders. We 
quote as follows : Under 26 in., $4 15 
26 to 40 in., $4.45 ; 41 to 50 in., $4.85; 

51 to 60 in., $5 15 ; 61 to 70 in., #5 .50; 
double diamond, under 26 in., $6 ; 2610 
40 in., $6.6j ; 41 to 50 in., $7 50; 51 to 
60 in., $8.50; 61 to 70 m., $9.50, Toronto, 
Hamilton and London. Terms, 4 months 
or 3 per cent. 30 days. 

COAL. 

The movement is active, with prices 
unaltered. We quote as follows at interna- 
tional bridges : Grate, $4. 75 per gross ton ; 
egg, stove and nut, $5 per gross ton with a 
rebate of 20c. off for July shipments. 
PETROLEUM. 

There is little doing and prices are steady 
at old pi ices. We quote : Pratt's Astral, 
16 to \b%c. in bulk (barrels, $1 extra) ; 
American water white, 16 y£ to 17c. in 
barrels; Photogene, 15^ to 16c; Sarnia 
water white, 15 to I5>£c. in barrels; Sarnia 
prime white, 14 to I4^c. in barrels. 



MARKET NOTES. 

Manufactuters have advanced paris green 
2c. and some jobbers have followed suit. 

The Francis Frost Paint Co., 120 124 
Richmond street, east, Toronto, intend 
moving to more commodious premises on 
Queen street, near Sherbourne, in the neer 
future. 



NEW FOUNDRY FOR SWANSEA 

The site of the old Ontario Roller Mills. 
Swansea, Ont., is likely to again become a 
scene of industrial activity. The Ditzel 
Metal Co., Toronto, consisting of P. H. 
Burton, president of The Merchants Dyeing 
and Finishing Co.; R. M. Bertram, vice- 
president of The Bertram Engine Works ; 
W. K. George, managing-director of The 
Standard Silver Co. ; L. V. Dusseau, 
secretary-treasurer of The Gendron Manu 
facturing Co ; W. A. Mitchell, of Todhunter 
& Mitchell, and L. J. Cosgrave, president 
of the Cosgrave Brewing Co., have been 
incorporated to manufacture refined metal, 
such as rolled copper, brass, silver, etc. It 
is proposed to erect a brick structure 200 x 
60 ft., with iron roof, and, when completed, 
between 50 and 60 hands will be employed. 
It is computed that the company will manu 
facture 1,000 tons of refined metal annu- 
ally. 

This industry will be a new one, for 
which the trade state there has been a good 
opening for some time. About 8200,000 
worth of this metal is imported annually. 



BRITISH BUSINESS CHANCES. 

Firms desirous of getting into communication 
with British manufacturers or merchants, or who 
wish to buy British goods on the best possible 
terms, or who are willing to become agents for 
British manufacturers, are invited to send partic- 
ulars of their requirements for 

FREE INSERTION 
in " Commercial Intelligence," to the Editor 

'SELL'S COMMERCIAL INTELLIGENCE,' 

168 Fleet Street, London, England. 

"Commercial Intelligence" circulates all ovi r 
the United Kingdom amongst the best firms. Firms 
communicating should give reference as to bona 
fides. 

N.B. — A free specimen copy will be sent on re- 
ceipt of a post card. 



DAVID PHILIP 

MANUFACTURERS' AGENT 

362M Main St., - WINNIPEG. 

Correspondence invited from mannfaUureis of Staple or 
Heavy Hardware, Iron or Stetl Bolls and Nuts, etc., 
ei her by carrying stock in Winnipeg or by selling direct 
from factorv. 

GOOD REFERENCES 

AXE HANDLES 

Very heavy stocks 

Thoroughly seasoned goods 

we make a Can ship promptly and 

specialty of . . . supply the very best 

" Hand Shaved " 



Octagon 
Axe Handles 



Made by 
Indians 



being the largest dealers in Canada in this line 

Can give exceptional value. 

Have 5,000 dozen of these handles 

on hand ready for polishing. 

Write for prices. 



Eastern Agtnt— W. B. Murdoclc, Amherst, N.S. 
Western Agent— Jno Burns, Jr., Vancouver, B.C. 
Montreal Agent— Alexander Gibb, 22 St. John St. 

W. C. CRAWFORD 

Tilbury, Ont. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



23 



PORTLAND 
CEMENTS 

Best German, Belgian and 
English Brands. 

Fire Bricks, Fire Clay, 

Flue Linings, 

Drain Pipes, 

Calcined Plaster, 

Granite Hard Wall Plaster, 

Wheelbarrows, 

Mortar Stains. 

A full stock of Builders' and Contractors' 
Supplies. Write for Quotations. 



W. HcNally & Co., 

MONTREAL. 



1879 



ESTABLISHED 



1879 



Essex Handle and Wood 
Turning Works 

Late of Essex, now LEAMINGTON, ONT. 

Makers <f Axe, Fork. Hake, Hoe, Sledge, Broom, 
Hammer and all kinds of Handles. Neck Yokes, 
Singletrees and Doubletrees, Bench Saws, Exercise 
Clubs, Baseball Bats, etc., etc. Do you sell any 
Shaved Pattern and Octagon Axe Handles? The 
largest and best trade in Canada does, because they 
give best satisfaction. All stock air-dried, not 
kiln-dried. If you are going to be in it, place your 
order with 

GARDNER BROS. & CO. 



The Atlantic 
Refining Co. 

Manufacturers and Importers of 

Lubricating Oils, 

Greases, and 
Boiler Compound, 

Phone 2033. 



Cor. Jarvis and Esplanade Sts., 
TORONTO, ONT. 



BURMAN & SONS' Celebrated Clippers 



Established 1871. 



BIRMINGHAM, ENG. 




for Horsemen 
and Barbers. 



NO. 297. 



NO. 3— POWER CLIPPER, with "Wrist Joint." 

("The Czar of Russia. 
As^supplied to- The King of D°nmark. 
(Earl Roberts, Etc., Etc 





THE "LEOPOLD" TOILET. 



THE "WARWICK" 

CLIPPER. 

Cuts over three teeth. 

As supplied to 

His Majesty's 
War Department. 



SEND FOR PRICE LIST AND TERMS. 

DELORME BROS., Agents, - De s b t r r e e s e t, es Montreal 



IMPROVED STEEL WIRE TRACE CHAINS. 

Every chain guaranteed. Most profitable and satisfactory chain to handle. 




Improved Quality and Cheaper Prices for 1901 

THE B. GREENING WIRE CO., limited 

Hamilton, Ont., and Montreal, Que. 



STOVE PIPE THIMBLF. 




This is our Improved 
Fire Proof, Asbestos- 
Li ned, Stovepipe 
Th'mble, for floors 
which extend from 8 to 
16 inches; also showing 
Register placed in 
thimble after removing 
pipe, for covering up 
hole or ventilating 
room, opened or closed 
as desred. Write us 
for catalogue showing 
full line of these goods 
and our other hardware 
specialties. 



THE COLLINS MFG. CO., 



34 Adelaide Street West 



TORONTO 



The Robin Hood 
Powder Company 

If you want the best Trap or Game load in 
the world, buy "Robin llood Smokeless," 
in " Rob n Hood " Shells. It is quick, safe, 
and reliable. Try it for pattern and pene- 
tration from forty to seventy yards against 
any powder on the market. We make the 
powder, we make the shells, and we load 
them. Write for our booklet, " Powder 
Facts." 

The Robin Hood Powder 
Company — 

SWANTON, VT. 



24 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HEATING and PLUMBING 



MOND FUEL GAS IN GREAT BRITAIN 

BID I ISll commercial and scientific cir- 
cles, says United States Consul 
James Boyle, of Liver] I. Eng., are 

much interested in a discovery made by 
Dr. Ludwig Mond, of the great chemical 
Firm of Brunner, Mond & Co.. Limited. 
whose headquarters are at Northwich, Che- 
shire. This discovery is a e.as for furnaces 
anil ^as engines, which, it. is clai <1. cat, 

lie supplied to consumers at a maximum 
price of 1 cents per 1,000 cubic feet. Pub- 
lic attention lias been drawn to tliis dis 
covery by the recent application of a num- 
ber of leading manufacturers in the South 
Staffordshire district for a Bill in Parlia- 
ment to give the necessary legal authority 
to erect plants, construct mains, etc.. to 
supply an area of I 35 square miles. The 
Bill has been read twice in the House of 
Commons and has passed through the com 
mittee stage successfully, so thai the 
scheme will, in all probability, be In actual 
operation within the next few years. Five 
generating stations are to be established. 
and from these the gas will lie conveyed, 
under pressure in underground pipes, to I he 
various manufacturers in the district for 
use in furnaces and gas engines, but not 
for illumination. Mond gas is a produce] 
gas, made from the cheapest class of small 
coal and dust, commonly called "bitumin- 
ous slack.'' Dr. Mond discovered a process 
by which this cheap slack can be converted 
into a clean caseous fuel in such a way that 
a very large proportion of the nitrogen of 
I he coal is recovered (as ammonia ) ami 
converted into sulphate of ammonia, whirh 
is a very valuable manure and fertilizer. 
The distinguishing features of the Mond 
process an' : 

I. The utilization of cheap bituminous 
slack. 

2. The recoverj of 90 pounds of sulphate 
of ammonia (value at present SI. 1 .)] ) for 
c\er\ ton of slack gasified. 

•'?. Low temperature working, so that no 
clinkers are formed in the producer, and 
the ammonia is not destroyed. 

■1. Very perfect regeneration of heat by an 
ingeniouslj designed system, usine water as 
a heat carrier. 

5. The production of a clean gas of ex 
tremelj uniform quality, free from tar and 
grit, and of a higher calorific value than 
most other producer gases. 

Mond Lias- is not ;i Lighting gas : it burns 

with a pale blue flame and lias a much 

lower heating value than illuminating gas. 
It is a gaseous fuel, adapted for wholesale 
use as a heating and power agent, and the 
uas engines at Wennington, Cheshire, using 

Monil mi-, hold the world's record for icon 
om.v and for long anil continuous runs. An 

experimental open hearth sled furnace has 

been worked with excellent results. using 
Aloud mis. and the gas is in daily use for 

class melting, ore roasting, man.) kinds of 
furnace work, evaporating liquids, heating- 
buildings, etc 



intervention of I he national holiday, too, 

has tended to make business dull. Conse- 
quently trade with tin- jobbing houses in 
this vicinity was reduced to a minimum. 
Nor is this condition at all unwelcome to 

the jobbers, for what, with the enervating 
weather and the difficulty of securing goods 
from I he makers, the jobber's life has not 

been entirely a happy one in i he near past. 
Nothing of importance has occurred in the 

trade since our hist report. Prices con 
tiniie strong till along the line, and the 

scarcity rioted in our previous reports in 
connection with several lines of eo.nls is as 
pronounced as ever.- Metal Worker. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING NOTES. 

Strachan Bros., plumbers, Nelson, B.C., 

have dissolved. 

.Mrs. Sylva More has registered as pro- 
prietress of S. 1 ion- & Co.. contractors., 
Mont real. 

The Strathcona Electric Light Company, 
Limited. Strathcona, N.W.T., are applying 
tor incorporat ion. 



PLUMBERS' SUPPLIES IN NEW YORK 

The depressing effect of the prolonged 
spell of excessive heat is reflected in the 
plumbing and steam fitting trade, where 
business Iran actions have been of a very 
languid sort during the past week. The 



SOME BUILDING NOTES. 

A new post office is to be built at liichi- 
bucto, N'.B. 

John I'cel intends building a hotel at 

Merlin, Out. 

A new Methodist church is being built 
tit Clinton, Ont. 

Tiie Baptist church tit Ridgetown, Out., 
is to be rebuilt. 

Albert Oliver is erecting ,a new house at 
llintonbiiru. I )nt . 

A new Anglican church is to be erected 
at St. Mark's, Man. 

Clark <.V Demill intend building a new 
fouixlrv .ii Preston, Out. 

A. M. G. McDonald is erecting a new drug- 
store at Campellton. N.B. 

Work Ins been started on tin- erection of 
a Provincial reformatory tit Vancouver. 

'I he Lake of The Woods Milling Coinpam 
intend erecting a second elevator at Rosser, 
Mil n. 

The Queen's Hotel, Brandon, Man., is to 
be replaced by a new building to be three 
storcj high. 

Rev: Father Hauck, J. H. Lever, Mrs. \. 
Elliott, Thos. Elliott and Thomas Sv me- 
an erecting new residences. 

A §75,000 station is to lie erected at 
Levis, (Jin 1 ., by the Intercolonial Railway. 
J. Gosselin litis the contract. 

A new Anglican church (St. Matthew's!, 
is being erected at the corner of Sherbrookc 
and Ellice avenues, Winnipeg. 

A new Presbyterian church is being erect 
cilat Reid's Mills. Out. Rev. Mr. Louie is 
chairman of the building C mittee. 

John Regian is erecting a new house and 
C. II. White and Sinclair & Co. are erect 
ing extensive additions to their stores in 
Orillia, Out. 

The congregation of Erskine Presbyterian 
church. Ottawa, have started the erection 
of a new 89,000 Sunday school hall. A 
new church will also be built. 

The Roman Catholics of St. Albert, N. 
W. 'I'.. propose to erect a $35,000 cathedral 
tit that point. Plans have been prepared 
liv I ■'. Deggendorfer, architect. Edmonton. 



PLUMBERS TO PLAY BALL. 

'I he Toronto Master Plumbers' \ ocia 
lion are dissatisfied with the results of then 
baseball mime with the team representing 
the supplv houses of i he city and aftei dui 
consideration have issued the hitler a chal 
IciiLtc for ti full 9-innings contest. George 
Clapperton is captain of the plumber.-' 
team and William Mansell, secretary, while 
■ I. M. Taylor, of The Gurnej Foundrj Co., 
Limited, is captain, and Adam Taylor, of 
The Dominion Radiator Co.. Limited, is 

-ecretarv of the Supply Association team 
A " warm " game may be looked for if 

the -uppl.v men feel the confidence in their 
prowess that they manifested at the game 
it Long Branch on Fridaj hist week 



« 



PLUMBING AND HEATING 
CONTRACTS. 

I'unl.v. Mansell & Co., have contracts for 

plumbing and heating a house for W. H. 
Preston, Midland. Out. ; for plumbing and 
steam heating O'Reilly's hotel. Smith'- 
Falls, (Tiit.; for plumbing and heating a 
new residence for Dr. W. Call. Parkhill, and 
for plumbing in the new premises for The 
Canada Cereal Co.. Peterboro', Ont. 

The Bennett & Wright Co., Limited. 
Toronto, have contracts for installing auto 
matic sprinklers in The Bell Telephone Co.'s 
premises. Montreal ; for plumbing in a house 
on McMaster avenue for Mr. Willnough ; for 
plumbing and heating a new dining hall 
and tin .addition to the factory of The Wm. 
Dtivies Co., Limited, Front street ; for 
plumbing, heating] gas fitting and electric 
wiring in houses on Crescent Road for John 
Stark and the Macpherson estate; for addi 
tion to the plumbing and heating of the 
Princess Theatre, King street west. To 
ronto. 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED. 

The follow ine permits have been issued 

to Andrew Kei r. Frame dwelling, Turner 
street. §1,000; Peter Cantara, two-storej 
solid brick dwelling, Bridge street, 8800 ; 
James Walker, two detached dwellings, 

Fourth avenue. 8800, all of Ottawa. 

Building permits have been issued In 
Toronto to Walter Stibbins, for a 81,500 
residence near Bloor street on Shaw street 
to A. T. Last mure, for a 81,500 residence 
tit Mil Pembroke street ; to The William 
Davies Co., Limited, for a $25,000 addition 
to their factory, and a $5,000 dining hall 
ai the corner of Front and Vine streets 
to John Lorsdale, for a $3,200 dwelling at 

the corner of Yonge and (iibson streets ; to 

Mrs. R. Norman, for a $1,700 dwelling neai 

Dcwsoii -trect on I lover-court Road : to Mi 
Sarah Barton, for two $4,000 dwellings at 
38 and in Albany avenue; to Dr. Avb 
worth, for a $4,000 dwelling at 1476 Queen 
street west : to Ceo. Phillips, for two pair 
,,f si. iioii residences at 342 to 348 Huron 

street : to W. A. Kemp, for $4,000 altera 

lion- to I l<.) Welleslr.V Crescent '. to Robl . 

Dtivies. for two $4,000 stores at Carlton 

and Church streets; to A. J. Henderson, 
for a pair of $2,250 dwellings at Albany 

avenue, near Bloor, 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



25 




CANADIAN ADVERTISING is best done by THE 
E. DESBARATS ADVERTISING AGENCY 
Montreal. 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 

13 St. John Street, Montreal 

Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishing to be represented in Canada. 

Will Bold Dp a Shelf ! 

That's what a shelf bracket is for. 
For Ihis purpose there can be 

NOTHING BETTER 
NOTHING CHEAPER 

than the .... 

BRADLEY STEEL »HELF BRACKET 

It is well Japanned, Strong end Light. 

The faving in freight is a good profit, aside 
from the lower price at which the goods are sold. 
B®" Order director through your jobber. 
ATLAS MFG. CO., New Haven, Conn.. U.S.A 



LOW TANK 
WATER CLOSET 
COMBINATIONS 
THE MOST PER- 
FECT ON THE 
MARKET 
NOISELESS IN 
ACTION 
BEAUTIFUL 
DESIGNS. 

Write for Catalogue. 

The James Morrison 
Brass Mfg. Co. 

Limited 

TORONTO, ONT. 




An 

Established 
Money 
Maker. 




Previous to the introduction of RAMSAYS 
EXTERIOR LEAD, painters were using pure, 
always pure. They paid big prices and had to 
e Gffnjfint with results, and the results were not 
actory ; for outside work, never could be 
satisfactory. It meant heart-ache for the 
| painter, and pocket-ache for the man who paid. 
Now RAMSAYS EXTERIOR LEAD has 
changed all that. Painters are pleased and 
the man who pays gets his money's worth, 
because RAMSAYS EXTERIOR LEAD 
goes further, looks better, lasts longer than 
pure lead. It's the best advertised lead in 
Canada. It costs less than pure and is worth 
more. 



A. Ramsay & Son 

PAINTMAKERS, 
Esfd 1842. MONTREAL. 



ONTARIO SILVER 00., 



Limited, 



NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA. 

M, „,.*,,.♦ .... r FLATWARE, CUTLERY a 
Manufacturers of ELECTRO PLATE 

Ask for our Catalogue and Quotations 




Ontario Nut Works, Paris 

BROWN & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

All sizes of Hot Pressed 
Nuts, Square and Hexagon. 



i 



TRUCKS 




THE FAIRBANKS COMPANY 



MONTREAL 





We make a specialty of 
RUBBER WHEELED TRUCKS 

Send for Truck Catalogue and Prices. for Hotels and Warehouses. 



^ 



3 GO 



26 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



"""""' 



lit Illlllll 



ELECTRICAL EFFECTS FOR WINDOWS. 

HOW TO WIRE. 



IN some of the larger stores an electrician 
is employed, and when the trimmer 
requires anything in electrical work 
done, he simply calls on the electrician. 
These cases are exceptional, for in the 
majority of stores the window-trimmer is 
thrown on his own resources and has no 
one to help him out of his difficulties, and 
if he is not posted on electrical appliances 
his designs are not properly illuminated— 
a deficiency that annoys the conscientious 
trimmer as well as his employer. 

While I do not understand electrical work 
thoroughly, and am not a good critic on 
such matters, yet I have had enough 
practical experience to enable me to do my 
own wiring, and the following remarks may 
prove ol value to some of my confreres in 
the profession who wish to enhance their 
displays by modern lighting and mechanical 
effects. 

Electricity, properly applied, is an im- 
portant factor in selling goods through the 
show window. Therefore, the window- 
trimmer who understands wiring his own 
windows is a more valuable man to his 
employer than one without this knowledge. 
In the following I shall try and explain 
simple wiring as minutely as possible, 
without using technical terms. 

If you have permanent lights in your 
windows, the first thing to do is to have a 
" cut out " placed on the inside of the win- 
dow with, say, a 50 volt circuit running to 
it from the street wires. Any dealer who 
keeps electrical supplies will show you what 
a "cut-out" is and how it is used; also 
the other articles that I may mention. 

Any electrician will put this "cutout" 
in for you in a short time. This saves you 
"tapping" the permanent wires, which 
should not be done, as it weakens the per- 
manent lights. Be sure to ascertain the 
voltage, or, to be plainer, find out how 
many lights your "cutout" will carry. 
Before you begin your work you must have 
sufficient tools to work with, and sufficient 
supplies to meet any case of emergency. 

The following is a list of what is generally 
required : 

A pair of nippers to cut and twist wire, 

Brace and bit, 

Screwdriver, 

An old pocket knife, 

A burner (candle will do). 

The list of supplies : 

A bundle of No. 10 or 12 wire, 

A roll of insulating tape, 



Porcelain knobs. 

Sockets, 

Bushings, 

Solder. 

The last item you can get prepared with 
resin, and it needs no acid to make it 
adhere. No quantities are mentioned in 
the list, as that will have to be decided by 
what you intend to work out. 

First of all, I will explain the difference 
between "arc" wiring and incandescent. 
If we had a row of "arc" lights to put up, 
we could run our wires as in Fig. 1. The 
current going to the first light passes 
through to the next, and so on, until it 
reaches the last light, when it returns to the 
dynamo at the po'ver-house. 

With incandescent lights we run two 
wires parallel and make our connections as 
in Fig. 2. 

This is called "multiple arc." Each 
lamp is independent of the others, and if 
one "dies" the current passes through the 
others uninterrupted. 

Now for the wiring. We will suppose 
you have a straight board 5 ft. long and 
you want to put lamps on it. Proceed as 
follows : Space out your distances and 
bore a hole wherever you 
want a lamp. Make this 
hole large enough to take 
the holder (or socket, as 
they are called). After 
wiring each socket with a 
piece of " cord wire" (that 
is, the twisted cord wire as 
used for suspending lamps 
with), place one in each 
hole. Leave enough of 
the cord to connect to the 
main wires. 

Fig. 3 will illustrate it. 

After each light is con- 
nected to the "mains" 
(that is, the wires that 
convey the current), take 
a piece of insulation tape 
about 4 in. long and wind 
it around the exposed 
joints thoroughly. This is 
to prevent it coming in 
contact with another wire 
that might cause a "short circuit" and 
blow your lights out. The "short circuit " 
will be explained later. 

To join the wires together cut about ij£ 
in. of the insulation off the wires, and then 
scrape them so as they will be clean and 



bright, and then twist one tightly around 
the main wire. Do this on the opposite 
side, and cover with insulation tape ; see 
Fig- 5- 

After you have them well insulated you 
can proceed to join the main wires to the 
"cutout" which supplies the current. First 
of all cut about an inch of the insulation off 
the ends of the main wires, then unscrew 
(just a little) the brass screws in the " cut- 
out," push the end of main wire under the t 
screw head and screw it down tightly on the 
wire. Do the same with the other main 
wire on the opposite side of the " cutout," 
put in your lamps and you will find they 
are lit. 

Great care should be taken to see that the 
" cut out " is properly "fused." The fuse 
in the " cut out " is a piece of lead wire ; 
its use is to prevent an accident, such as 
fire, etc. Should the main wires touch each 
other it would cause a short circuit. The 
fuse then " blows out," that is it melts and 
all that is required to start the lights again 
is a new piece of fuse wire put in the old 
one's place. 

Care should also be taken not to allow 
the ends of the mains to touch each other, 
especially when connecting them to the 
" cut out." If they touch it will blow out 
your fuse. 

Insert the ends in the " cut out" one at 
a time and see that they are tightly screwed 
in. If you don't have them tight a lot of 



<-<m 






N KWOfiS 




LAMP 



AAA1*S 



CO R D W ' 




/« 



power is wasted. Also with loose joinings. 
It is always better to solder the connections, 
but I seldom do so as I join them tightly. 
When I have a cluster of lights, say, four 
or five, I always solder the ends where they 
are connected to the "feed" or main wires. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



27 



The same principles as above explained 
will enable one to place lights in circles, 
horseshoes, and any other designs that may 
be required. The above remarks refer to a 
design where a single line of lights is 
needed, that is where they run uninter- 
ruptedly from one light to another. 

But how about a design that cannot be 
wired that way ? It is very simple, as the 
accompanying diagrams will illustrate. 
Notice where the connections are made. 

These are very rough sketches, but will 
convey the idea. The following are a few 
" don'ts " for those not familiar with 
wiring : 

Don't bring a wire through the floor or 
window without bringing it through a 
"bushing" (that is, a clay tube made for 
the purpose). 

/ r»B "C»r Our- 




understands simple wiring like the fore- 
going examples, which is about all that is 
necessary to understand to get up neat 
effects with lights. If any of my readers 
are interested in electrical effects, he can 
generally get all the information he desires 
from any local electrician from whom he 
gets his supplies. 

Don't be afraid to try it. A great many 
young fellows have a dread of an electric 
wire. There is no danger whatever con- 
nected with it, if caution is exercised. 

I have a 75 volt circuit in all of my win- 
dows, from which I take my connection. I 
have been doing my own wiring for a num- 
ber of years, and have never had the 
slightest trouble. 

I did not know an iota about wiring when 
I first tried it, but, by asking questions from 
different electricians and 
by experiment at different 
times, I soon became 
acquainted with it. I find 
it very interesting and fas- 
cinating work, and at 
present I have some beau- 
tiful electrical effects in our 
windows which are receiv- 
ing great comment. I trust 
I have made my ideas 
plain enough. If any 
reader has a design that 
he would like wired and 
does not know how to go 
about it, if he will send me 
a drawing of the design I 
will be pleased to forward 
him a diagram of how it 
can be wired and what it 
will cost to do the same. 



Don't forget to cut the wire where X is 
marked, as shown in Fig. 7. 

If you forget it, it will cause a "short 
circuit." 

Don't handle live wires ; 1 10 volts won't 
kill you, but it is decidedly unpleasant, and 
through carelessness some day you may 
touch a stronger one. Practise caution. 

When you get the electrician to put up 
the "cutout," get him to run a switch in 
for you also, and get him to show you how 
to connect it to the wires of your design. 
^\ Don't leave a bare wire show from the 
street ; cover it with the same color as the 
background. 

Don't think the writer of these remarks 
knows all about electricity. He merely 



HOMELY RELATIVES 
OF DIAMONDS. 

The closest relative of 
the diamond is a smooth 
black substance called 
graphite.says a writer in St.Nicholas. In one 
form you handle it every day, for graphite is 
used in making lead pencils. Gas carbon 
is a cousin of the diamond, and is obtained, 
as you might imagine from the name, in the 
process of making gas. Only three things 
come from bituminous coal — gas, coal tar 
and coke. Gas carbon is another name for 
coke. Now, the diamond gives exquisite 
and inimitable sparkles of light, which 
makes it of great value as a jewel ; but it 
gives only the pleasure of possession. Its 
sober- hued cousin, coke, affords broad 
beams of light, making the path of night 
easy to travel and lessening the crime that 
used to prevail in dimly lighted streets, for 
from coke the long black pencils, or 
" carbons." used in arc lights are made. 



CALCULATING MACHINES. 

CALCULATING machines have been in 
use for so long, and lire used at the 
present time by so mans people, 
that it would bo natural to suppose that, 
everybody would lia\e some sort, of 
acquaintance with them, mid some idea of 
the principles on which they work, remarks 
Iron and Coal Trades' Review. Personal 
experience, however, shows that a calculat 
ing machine is nearly always regarded as a 
novelty, and visually as something excep 
tionally wonderful. 

The first recorded attempt at an arith- 
metical instrument in Great Britain was 
made b\ rapier, the inventor of logarithms, 
early in the seventeenth century. It con 
sisted simply of a movable multiplication 
table, somewhat flippantly called 

" Napier's bones," in spite of the fact that 
the inventor christened his system rhab 
dology . There is much that is good about 
t hese "bones," but as a calculating instru- 
ment it will not compare for a moment 
with logarithms, for which we are largely 
indebted to Napier. 

'I lie first leal calculating machine was 
invented by tin; philosopher Paschal, about 
1650. He was then a lad of 19, helping 
his father in work which required much 
calculation ; and lie contrived a series of 
wheels connected with one another, with the 
ten numbers U to engraved on each. 
Addition and substraction were performed 
by turning the appropriate wheels by hand, 
the carrying over being mechanically pro- 
's ided for. 

Whenever calculating machines are men- 
tioned, people invariably think of Charles 
Babbage, who undoubtedly designed by far 
the most complete machine that has ever 
been invented. Babbage's machine was 
designed to calculate elaborate tables and 
automatically set them up in type, or else 
supply a mould in which stereotyped 
plates of the tables could be cast. 
After many experiments, he constructed 
his first. " difference engine," as he 
called it. for the reason that he employed 
the method of differences as a general prin- 
ciple on which to base the calculat inns, lie 
said that his machine could go on for years 
working by the same formula. Jt could 
then change, without human intervention, 
to another formula for a single calculation, 
and subsequently resume working bj the 
original formula. 

Since Babbage's day many small calculat 
ing machines of various kinds have been 
invented, of which the most practical and 
widely used are twT>. The first of these 
is an American invention, called the comp- 
tometer. This is actuated by keys like 
those of a typewriter, and by its means it 
is simple to add, feasible to substract, 
multiply and divide. It has the great 
merits of simplicity of construction and l«'\\ 
price. The second of the calculating 
machines at present in commercial use is 
the arithmometer, an English invention. 



W. F. Hartwell, general merchant, 
Wawanesa, Man., has suffered loss by fire ; 
insured. 

F. G. Franklin, general merchant. Hynd- 
ford, Out., is dead. His business will be 
continued by Mis. F. G. Franklin. 



28 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MANITOBA MARKETS. 

Winnipeg, July 8, 1901. 

HARDWARE AND RAINTS. OILS 
AND GLASS. 

BUSINESS is fair and prices without 
change for the week. Building hard- 
ware is the line chiefly in demand. 
Reports from the country are favorable, but 
it is generally conceded that we have had 
sufficient rain. 

Quotations for the week are as follows : 

Rarhed wire, ioo lb S3 45 

Plain twist 3 45 

Staples 3 95 

Oiled annealed wire io 3 95 

" n 4 oo 

12 4 05 

" 13 4 2 ° 

14 4 35 

15 t 45 
Wire nails, 30 to 60 dy, keg 3 5° 

16 and 20 3 60 

" 10 3 60 

8 3 7° 

6 3 75 

4 3 9° 

3 4 15 

Cut nails, 30 to 60 dy 3 10 

20 to 40 3 15 

" 10 to 16 3 20 

8 325 

6 3 3° 

4 3 4° 

3 3 75 

Horsenails, 45 per cent, discount. 

Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No 1 4 65 

No. 2 and larger 4 4° 

Snow shoes , No. o to No. 1 4 90 

No. 2 and larger 440 

Steel, No. o to No. 1 4 95 

No. 2 and larger 4 7° 

Bar iron, $2.50 basis. 
Swedish iron, $5.00 basis. 

Sleigh shoe steel 3 00 

Spring steel 3 25 

Machinery steel 3 75 

Tool steel , Black Diamond , 100 lb 8 50 

Jessop 13 00 

Sheet iron, black, 10 to 20 gauge, 100 lb. 3 50 

20 to 26 gauge 3 75 

28 gauge 4 00 

Galvanized American, 16 gauge. . . 2 54 

18 to 22 gauge 4 50 

24 gauge 4 75 

26 gauge 5 °o 

28gauge 5 25 

Genuine Russian ,1b 12 

Imitation " " 8 

Tinned, 24 gauge, 100 lb 7 75 

26 gauge 8 00 

28 gauge 8 50 

Tinplate, IC charcoal, 20 x 28, box 10 75 

IX " 1275 

IXX " 14 75 

Ingot tin 33 

Canada plate, 18 x 21 and 18 x 24 3 25 

Sheet zinc, cask lots, 100 lb 7 50 

Broken lots 8 00 

Pig lead, 100 lb 6 00 

Wrought pipe, black up to 2 inch ... .50 an 10 p.c. 

" Over 2 inch 50 p.c. 

Rope, sisal, 7-16 and larger $11 00 

% 1 1 50 

" % and 5-16 12 00 

Manila, 7-16 and larger 14 00 

# 14 5° 

" y t and 5-16 1500 

Solder 20 

Cotton Rope, all sizes, lb 17 

Axes, chopping $ 7 50 to 12 00 

" double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 

Screws, flat head, iron, bright 87 J4 

Round " " 82% 

Flat "brass... 80 

Round" " 75 

Coach 57 K p.c. 

Bolts, carriage 55 p.c. 

Machine 55 p.c. 

Tire 60 p.c 

Sleigh shoe 65 p.c. 

Plough 40 p.c. 

Rivets, iron 5op.c. 

Copper, No. 8 35 

Spades and shovels ... 40 p.c. 

Harvest tools 50, and 10 p.c. 

Axe handles, turned, s.g. hickory, doz.. $2 50 

No. 1 1 5° 



No. 2 1 25 

Octagon extra 1 75 

No. 1 1 25 

Files common 70, and 10 p.c. 

Diamond 60 

Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 50 p.c. 

Dominion, C.F., pistol 30 p.c. 

military 15 p.c. 

American R.F 30 p.c. 

C.F. pistol 5 p.c. 

C.F. military 10 p.c. advance. 

Loaded shells : 

Eley's soft, 12 gauge black 16 5° 

chilled, 12 guage 18 00 

soft, 10 guage 21 00 

chilled, 10 guage 23 00 

Shot, Ordinary, per 100 lb 6 25 

Chilled 6 75 

Powder, F.F., keg 4 75 

F.F.G 5 00 

Tinware, pressed, retinned 75 and 2% p.c. 

" plain 70 and 15 p.c. 

Graniteware, according to quality 50 p.c. 

PETROLEUM. 

Water white American 25 \4c. 

Prime white American 24c. 

Water white Canadian 22c. 

Prime white Canadian 21c. 

PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS 

Turpentine, pure, in barrels $ 61 

Less than barrel lots 66 

Linseed oil, raw .* 92 

Boiled 95 

Lubricating oils , Eldorado castor 25 % 

Eldorado engine 24^ 

A tlantic red 27 % 

Renown engine 41 

Black oil 23 'A to 25 

Cylinder oil (according to grade) . . 55 io 74 

Harness oil 61 

Neatsfoot oil $ 1 00 

Steam refined oil 85 

Sperm oil I 50 

Castor oil per lb. 1 1 14 

Glass, single glass, first break, 16 to 25 

united inches 2 25 

26 to 40 per 50 ft. 2 50 

41 to 50 " 100 ft. 5 50 

51 to 60 " " " 6 00 

61 to 70 per 100-ft. boxes 6 50 

Putty, in bladders, barrel lots per lb. 2*/£ 

kegs " 2% 

White lead, pure per cwt. 7 00 

No 1 6 75 



Prepared paints, pure liquid colors, ac- 
cording to shade and color, per gal. $1.30 toSi.90 



BUILD UP YOUR TOWN. 

A TOWN is not built up through its 
natural advantages alone, writes 
" The Hustler," in Stoves and 
Hardware Reporter. It may have untold 
stores of wealth around it, it may be 
crossed by a dozen railways and have other 
advantages that need only to be utilized in 
older to become money-makers, but the 
town can't make itself and it must be 
created as an enterprising, go-ahead platty 
by those who constitute its population. 
Thrift begets thrift and strength grows 
upon itself without waste. If the citizens 
of a town advertise themselves for enter- 
prise and public spirit, it becomes known 
as a desirable place in which to live and 
do business. Industries increase in num- 
ber, the town takes on a new growth, busi- 
ness improves and wealth follows as a mat- 
ter of course. 

I could never understand why people do 
not take an interest in the affairs of the 
place where they live. Every item that 
goes into the improvement of a town helps 
those who do business there. All citizen's 
are partners in municipal matters. If you 
and I own a business together and I don't 
take an active interest in its affairs, you 
will probably want to have the partnership 
dissolved, to get rid of me because I don't 
help you. It should be the same way with 
indifferent partners in citizenship. You 
may not be able to get rid of them, since 
they have equal rights with you " in life, 
liberty, and the pursuit of happiness," but 
you can establish a good example and show- 
by actual experience that it pays to be pub- 
lic-spirited, pays to build up a town, pays 
to take it away from a dead-and-alive exist- 
ence, pays to be a citizen like those of 
Blooming-ton, pays even to have a sort of 
moral fire that will burn out the cobwebs, 



American Sheet Steel Company 

Battery Park Building 
New York 

Manufacturers of all varieties of 

Iron and Steel Sheets 
Black and Galvanized 
Plain and Painted 
Flat, Corrugated and 
"V" Crimped 

Apollo Best Bloom Galvanized 
W. Dewees Wood Company's 

Patent Planished Iron 
W. Dewees Wood Company's 

Refined Smooth Sheets 
Wellsville Polished Steel Sheets 

Representatives for Canada 
B. & S. H. Thompson & Company 
26 St. Sulpice Street 
Montreal 



' 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



29 



u 



jj 



MIDLAND 

BRAND 

Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connells'ville Coke as fuel, "Mid- 
land''' will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 

Write for Prices to Sales Agents: 

Drummond, McCall & Co. 

MONTREAL, QUE. 



or to 



Canada Iron Furnace Co. 



MIDLAND, ONT. 



Limited 



"The Peerless" 



is the best Bolster Spring ever 
produced. A fine line for the 

hardware trade. Wr ite Us For Prices. 




James Warnock & Co. 



Gait, Ont. 



CUHHE^T JVLAHKET QUOTATIONS 



July 12, 1901. 
These pricea are tor such qualities and 
quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 
Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list as the desire 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

Tin. 

Lamb and Flag and Straits— 

56 and 28 lb. ingots, per lb. 31% 32 

Tinplates. 

Charcoal Plates— Bright 

M.L.8., equal to Bradley. ^VS. 01 

I.C., usual sizes Jp 50 

I.X., " 8 00 

i.xix., " 9 50 

Famous— „ „ 

I.C 6 50 

IX 8 00 

IX .X... 9 5° 

Kaven t Vuiture Grades— 

I.O., usual sizes * 50 

i x *' 5 25 

iXX " 6 00 

I.XXX., '■ 6 75 

D.C., 12>/,xl7 « JO 

irx.'x".::: , .... 500 

Coke Plates— Briglt 
Bessemer Steel— 

I.C. .usual sizes •)<> 

I C., special sizes, base * uu 

20x28 7 75 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 
Dean or J. G. Grade— 

1 C , 20x28, 112 sheets 8 00 

I X., TerneTin 10 I 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 
Cookley Grade— Per lb. 

X X.,14x56,50sbeetbis") 

'• 14x60, " > .... 0<6 l 'i 

■' 14x65. " > 

Tinned Sheets 

74x30 up to 24 gauge % l ,l v ' 

" 26 " 18 

•• 28 " 08% 

Iron and Steel. 

Common Bar, per 100 lbs.... 185 190 

Refined " " 2 35 

Horse Shoe Iron -! 35 

Hoop steel, V/ 2 to 3 in. base, 

extras for smaller sizes 3 00 

Sleigh Shoe-Steel " base ... 2 10 

TireSteel 2 3) 2 50 

Reeled Machinery .... 3 00 

Toe Calk Steel 2 85 3 00 

T Firth &Co's toolsleel.per lbO 12'/ 2 13 

Jessop's tool Steel 12% 13 

Morton's tool. teel C 12V, 13 

Black Diamond and " B C, 

tool steel J 10 11 

Drill Steel, per lb 0(8 10 

Boiler Tubes. 

P/4-incb 012V2 

2 " 13 

2% " ° I 5 

» * •• 16 

31/ •• ' 20 

Steel Boiler Plain. 

ifXiioch 2 50 2 60 

-O-ieYnck i .. 2 60 2 70 

^4 inch and thlckir 2 50 2 60 

Black Sheet*. 

Com. D Fl. 

18gauge 2 75 3 00 

20 gauge 2 75 3 CO 

22to24* " 2 75 3 25 

26 " 2 ?5 3 50 

28 " 300 



Canada Plater. 

All dull, 52 sheets 2 90 

Half polished 3 00 

Allbright 3 !0 

Iron Pipe. 
Black pipe— 

% " 4 65 

H inch 3 40 

% " 3 45 

% " 3 70 

% " 385 

1 " 5 40 

1% " 7 70 

P/s " 9 10 

2 " 12 50 

2% " 20 95 

3 " 24 '5 

%% " 3)75 

4 " 39 00 

5 " 47 35 

6 " 62 10 

Galvanized pipe— 

V, inch 5 15 

y. " 5 50 

1 " 7 95 

V/ t " 10 80 

IV, '• 12 95 

2 " 17 35 

Galvanized Sheets. 

Queen's 
G C. Comet. Amer. Head. 
16 gauge ... 4 00 3 75 

18 to 24 gauge 4 00 3 85 4 25 4 00 
26 " 4 25 4 10 4 25 4 25 

28 " 1 50 4 15 4 40 4 50 

Case lots 10 to 15c. less. 

28 gauge American equals 26 gauge English. 

Chain. 

Proof Coil, 3-16 in., p*r 1001b 

% " 8 90 8 50 

5-16 " " 4 70 5 00 

% " " 4 05 4 ro 

7-16 " " 3 9J 4 75 

% " " 3 ?0 4 10 

9-16 " " 3 65 4 (5 

% " " 3 35 3 90 

% " '• 3 CO 4 10 

Halter, kennel and post chains, 40 to 40 and 

5 p.c. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Tie-out chains 65 p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 45 p.o. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, dis- 
count 35 p c. 
Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis- 
count 40 p.c. 

Copper. 
Ingot 

English B. 8., ton lots 1754 

Lake Superior 

Bais 
Cutlengthsround.Vjtoysin. 23 25 
" round and square 

1 to 2 inches.... 23 25 
Sheet. 
Plain, 14 oz., and light, 16 

oz. , 14x48 and 14x60 24 i 4>/ 2 

Plain, 14 oz., and light, 16 

oz., irregular sizes 24>/ 2 25 

Tinned copper sheets 26 

Planished 32 

Braziers (lnsheels.) 

4x6ft. 25 to 30 lbs. ea., per lb 25 

" 35 to 45 " " .... 24 

50-lb. and above, " .... 23 
Boiler and T. K. PittB 

Plain Tinned, pt rib 28 

Spun, per lb 32 

Brass. 
Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge 10 per cent. 

Sheets, hard-rolled, 2i4 S3 

Tubing, base, per t 23 

Zinc Spelter 

Foreign, perlb 05>/ 2 06 

DomeBtio " 



Zinc Sheet. 

5cwt.casks 00 6V„ 

Partcasks CO 6*4 

Lead. 

Imported Pig, per lb 04'/4 0(4% 

Bar.llb 05% 05% 

Sheets, 2% lbs. sq.ft., by .... 06 l A 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lbs., " .... 06 

Note.— Cut sheets V 2 cent per lb. extra. 
Pipe, by the roll, usual weights per yard.lisis 
at 7c. per lb. and 30 p.c. dis. f.o.b. Toron»o. 

Note.— Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 
8-ft. lengths lists at 7% cents. 

Shot. 

Common, $6.50 per 1C0 lb. ; chilled, $7.00 
per 100 lb. ; buck, seal aDd ball, $7.50. Dis- 
count, 17'/ 2 p.c. Prices are f.o.b. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Terms 3 per cent, cash, freights equalized. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings. 
Discount, 60 and 10 per cent, on medium and 
extra heavy, and 60 per cent, on light. 

Solder. Per lb. Per lb. 
Bar half-and-half, guarant'd .... 19V 2 

Bar half-and-half, commer'l 0)9 

Refined 18'/ 2 

Wiping 18 

Note.— Prices of this graded according to 
quantity. The prices of other qualities of 
solder in the market indicated by private 
brands vary according to composition. 

Antimony. 

Cookson's, per lb 10/, 11 

White Lead. Per 100 lb. 

Pure 6 37 

No.l do 600 

No.2do 5 o2V 2 

No.3do 5 ! 5 

No. 4 do * 87% 

Munro's Select Flake White 1 iV/i 

Elephant and Decorators' Pure 7 12 l / 2 

Brandram'sB B. Genuire 7 60 

" " Decorative 7 00 

" No. 1 6 50 

" No. 2 S 75 

Red Lead. 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt $5 50 

Genuine, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 5 75 

No. 1, 560 lb. casks, per cwt 5 25 

No. 1, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 5 00 

White Zinc Paint. 

Elephant Snow White 08 09 

Pure White Zinc 08 0(9 

No 1 06 07V, 

No! 2 05 (6^ 

Dry White Lead. 

Pure, casks 5 75 

Pure, kegs 6 25 

No. 1, casks 5 60 

No. 1, kegs 5 00 

Prepared Paints. 

In Vt, V2 an d 1 gallon tins. 

Pure, per gallon 125 

Second qualities,per gallon 1 1C 

Barn (inbbls.) 75 85 

The Sherwin-Williams Paints 14a 

Canada Paint Cos Pure 125 

Toronto Lead & Color Cos Pure 1 25 

Sanderson Pearcy's Pure 1 20 

Stewart & Wood's Champion Pure. 1 20 

Colors in Oil. 

25 lb. tins, Standard Quality. 

Venetian Red, per lb 05 

Chrome Yellow 11 

Golden Ochre 06 

French " 05 

MarineBlack 09 

" Green 09 

Chrome " 08 

French Imperial Green 09 



Colors, Dry. 

Yellow Ochre ( J. C.) bbls.... 135 140 

Yellow Ochre J.F.L.S.), bbls ... 2 75 

Yellow Ochre (Royal) 110 115 

Brussels Ochre 2 00 

Venetian Red(best). per cwt. 180 190 

English Oxides, per cwt 3 00 3 25 

American Oxides, per cwt.. 1 75 2 00 

Canadian Oxides, per cwt... . 1 75 2 00 

Super MagneticOxides, 93p 0. 2 00 2 25 

Burnt Sienna, pure, per lb 10 

" Umber, " " 10 

do Raw 09 

Drop Black, pure 09 

Chrome Yellows, pure 18 

Chrome Greens, pure, per lb 12 

Golden Ocbre .... 03% 

Ultramarine Blue in 28-lb.. 

boxes, per lb 08 24 

Fire Proof Mineral, per 100 lb 100 

Genuine Eng. Litharge, perlb 07 

Mortar Color, per 100 lb 125 

English Vermillion 80 

Pure Indian Red, No. 45 lb 80 

Whiting, per 100 lb 55 

Bine Stone. 

Casks, for spraying, per b 07 

100-lb. lots, do. per lb 08 

Putty. 

Bulk in bbls., 1 90 

Bulk in less quantity 2 f'5 

Bladders in bbls 2 1') 

Bladders in kegs, boxes orlotse. ... 2 25 

Bladders in 25-lb. tins 2 35 

Bladders in 12%-lb. tins 2 65 

Madders in Lu k or lias less than 1001b2 9) 

Varnishes. 

In 5-gal. lots.). Per gal. 

Carriage, No. 1 2 90 3 3D 

body 8 00 9 00 

" rubbing 4 00 5 00 

Gold Size, Japan 3 00 3 40 

Brown Japan 2 40 2 80 

Elastic Oak 2 90 3 30 

Furniture, extra 2 40 2 80 

No. 1 1 60 2 00 

Hard Oil Finish 2 70 3 10 

Light Oil Finish 3 20 3 60 

Demar 3 3) 3 70 

Shellac, white 4 40 4 89 

" orange 4 00 4 40 

Furniture Brown Japan 1 60 2 00 

Black Japan 2 40 2 81) 

" No. 1 1 60 2 00 

The Imperial Varnish & Color Co's., 
Limited Elastilite Varnish 1 gal. can, each. 
$3.0). 

Grani.ine Floor Finish per gal , $2.75. 

Maple Leaf Coach Enamels ; Size 1, $1 2) ; 
Size 2, 70c. ; Size 3, 4 Jc. each. 

Castor Oil. 

East India, in cases, per lb. . 10 10 l /j 
" " small lots lu'/ 2 11 

Cod Oil, Etc. 

CodOilpergal 50 55 

Pure Olive 1 20 

" Neatsfoot 90 

Glae. 

Cjmmon 08'/ 2 09 

French Medal 14 U hji 

Cabinet sheet 12 13 

White, extra 18 20 

Gelatine 22 30 

Strip 18 20 

Coopers 19 20 

Huttner 18 



30 



CANADIAN HARDWARE ANu METAL 



JAMES HUTTON & CO. 



Sole Agents in Canada for 

Joseph Rodgers & Sons, Limited, 
Steel, Peech & Tozer, Limited, 
W. & S. Butcher, 



Thomas Goldsworthy & Sons, 
Burroughes & Watts, Limited, 
Etc., Etc., 



Have reopened their offices in Victoria Chambers, 



232 McGill Street, 



MONTREAL. 



HARDWARE. 

Ammunition. 

Cartridges. 

B. B Cap Dom. 50 and 5 per cent. 

Rim Fire Pistol, dis. 40 p. c, Amer. 

Rim Fire Cartridges, Dom., 50 and 5 p. o. 

Central Fire Pistol and Rifle, 10 p. 0. Amer. 

Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes, Dom. 
30 per cent. 

Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dom., 15 and 5 per cent. 

Central Fire, Military and Sporting, Amer. 
add 5 p.c. to list. B.B. Caps, discount 40 
per cent. Amer. 

Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap and 
" Dominion " grades, 25 per cent. Rival 
and Nitro, 10 p c. advance on list. 

Brass Shot Shells, 55 per cent. 

Primers, Dom., 30 per cent. 

Wads per lb- 

Best thick white felt wadding, in 3 4-lb 

bags :••:• * 00 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

%-lb.bags 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 35 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 5'J0 each, 8 gauge 55 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge • . • ■ • • • 25 

Thin card wads in boxes of 1,000 
each, 8 gauge 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M. 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9and 1C gauges 70 

7 and 8 gauges 90 

5 and 6 gauges 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 gauges 1 65 

5 and 6 gauges 1 90 

Adzes. 

Discount, 20 per cent. 

Anvils. 

Wrights, 80-lb. and over I0 r ' 4 

Hay Budilen, 80-lb. and over .... 09' i 
Brooks, " " " •••• Oil 1 , 

Angers. 

Gilmour's, discount 65 and 5 p.o. off list. 

Axes. 
Chopping Axes 

Single bit, per doz 5 50 10 00 

Double bit, " 11 00 18 00 

Bench Axes, 40 p.c. 
Broad Axes, 33% per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boy's A'xes 5 75 6 75 

Splitting Axes 6 50 12 00 

Handled Axes 7 00 10 00 

Axle Grease. 

Ordinary, per gross 5 75 6 00 

Best quality 13 00 15 00 

Bath Tubs. 

Zinc GOO 

Copper, discount 15 p.c. off revised list 

Baths. 

Standard Enameled. 

5%-lnoh rolled rim, 1st quality 25 00 

2nd " 21 00 

Antl-Frlctlon Metal. 

"Tandem" A per lb. 27 

B " 21 

C " 11% 

Magnolia Anti-Friction Metal, per lb. 25 
Frictionless metal, per lb 23 

SYRACUSE SMELTING WORKS. 

Aluminum, genuine 45 

Dynamo "29 

Special • • • JJ f J 

Aluminum, 99 p.c. pure "Syracuse .. 50 

Bells. 

Hand. 
Brass, 60 per cent. 
Mckel, 55 per cent. 



Cow. 
American make, discount 66% per cent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 
Door. 

Gongs, Sargant's 5 50 8 00 

" Peterboro', discount 45 per cent. 
Farm. 

American, each 125 3 00 

House. 

American, per lb 35 40 

Bellows. 

Hand, per doz 3 35 4 75 

Moulders', per doz 7 50 10 00 

Blacksmiths', discount 40 per cent. 

Belting. 
Extra, 60, 10 and 5 per cent. 
Standard, 70 per cent. 
No. 1, 70 and 10 p.c. 

Bits. 
Auger. 
Gilmour's, discount 60 and 5 per cent. 
Rockford, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings' Gen., net list. 
Car. 
Gilmour's, 47% to 50 per cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Damond, Shell, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Nail and Spike, per gross 2 25 5 20 

Blind and Bed Staples. 

All sizes, per lb 07V 4 12 

Bolts and Nuts. Percent. 

Carriage Bolls, full square, Norway 65 

" " full square 65 

Common Carriage Bolts, alt sizes 60 

Machine Bolts, all sizes..... 60 

Coach Screws 70 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 72% 

Blank Bolts 60 

Bolt Ends 62% 

Plough Bolts 60 

Nuts, square 4 c. off 

Nuts, hexagon 4' ,<■.. off 

Tire Bolts 67% 

Stove Bolts 67% 

Stove rods, per lb 5% to 6c. 

Boot Calks. 
Small and medium, ball, per M. .. . 4 25 

Small heel, per M 4 50 

Bright Wire Goods. 

Discount 6:%percent. 

Broilers . 
Light, dis., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Reversible, dls., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Vegetable, per doz., dis. 37% per cent. 

Henis, No. 8, " 6 00 

Henis,No.9, " 7 00 

Queen City " 7 50 00 

Butchers' Cleavers. 

German, per doz 6 00 1100 

American, per doz 12 00 20 00 

Building Paper, Etc. 

Plain building, per roll 30 

Tarred lining, per roll 40 

Tarred roofing, per 100 lb 1 65 

Coal Tar, per barrel 3 50 

Pitch, per 100-lb 85 

Carpet felt , per ton 45 10 

Bull Rings. 
Copper, $2.00 for 2% in. and $1.90 for 2 in. 

Butts. 
Wrought BrasB, net revised ist 

Cast Iron. 
Loose Pin, dis., 6u per cent. 

Wrought Steel. 
Fast Joint, dis. 65, 10 and 2% per ooot. 
Loose Pin, dis. 65, 10 and 2% per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, dis. 70, 70 and 5 per o nt. 

Gen. Bronzed, per pair 40 65 

Carpet Stretchers . 

A merioan, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Bullard's, per doz 6 50 .... 

Castors. 
Bed, new list, dis. 55 to 57% percent. 
Plate, dis. 52% to 57% percent. 
Cattle Leaders. 

Nos. 31 and 32, per gross 50 9 50 

Cement. 

Canadian Portland 2 50 2 80 

EngliBh " 3 00 

Belgian " 2 50 2 75 

Canadian bydraullo 125 150 



Chalk. 

Carpenters Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump, per owt 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon, per gross 14 18 

Chisels. 
Socket, Framing and Firmer. 
Broad's, dis. 70 per cent. 
Wamock's, dis. 70 per cent. 
P. S. & W. Extra 60, 10 and 5 p.c. 

Churns. 
Revolving Churns, metal frames— No. 0, $8— 
No. 1, $8.50— Vo. 2, $9.00— No. 3, $10.00— 
No. 4, $12.00— No. 5, $16.00 each. Ditto, 
wood frames— 20c. each less than above. 
Discounts : Delivered from factories, 58 
p.c. ; from stock in Montreal, 58 p.c. 
Terms, 4 months or 3 p.c. cash in 30 days. 
Clips. 
Axle dis. 65 per cent. 

Closets 

Plain Ontario Syphon Jet $16 00 

Emb. Ontario Syphon Jet 17 00 

Fittings net 1 00 

Plain Teutonic Syphon Washout 10 00 

Emb. Teutonic Syphon Washout 1 1 00 

Fittings net 1 25 

Low Down Teutonic plain 16 CO 

" " embossed 17 00 

Plain Richelieu net 3 75 

Emb. Richelieu net 4 00 

Fittings net 1 25 

Lnw Down Out. Sy. Jet, plain net. . 19 60 
" " " •' " emb d. net 20 50 

Closet connection net 1 25 

Basins, round, 14 in 1 00 

" oval, 17 x 14 in 2 5') 

" 19x15 in 3 75 

Discount 40 p.c, except on net figures. 
Compasses, Dividers, Ktc. 
American, dis. 62% to 65 per cent. 

Cradles, Grain. 
Canadian, dis. 25 to 33% per cent. 
Crosscut Saw Handles. 

S. &D., No. 3, per pair 17% 

" 5, " 22% 

" 6, " 15 

Boyn ton pattern " 20 

Door Springs. 

Torrey's Rod, per doz (15 p.c.) 2 00 

Coil, per doz 88 160 

English, per doz 2 00 4 00 

Draw Knives. 
Coach and Wagon, dis. 50 and 10 per cent. 
Carpenters, dis. 70 per cent. 
Drills. 
Hand and Breast. 
Millar's Falls, per doz. net list. 
DRILL BITS. 
Morse, dis., 37% to 40 per cent. 
Standard dis. 50 and 5 to 55 per cent 

Faucets . 
Common, cork-lined, dis. 35 per cent. 
ELBOWS. (Stovepipe.) 

No. 1, per doz 1 40 

No. 2, per doz 1 20 

Bright, 20c. per doz. extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 
Discount, 45 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 
Iron, discount 40 per cent. 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 
Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 
FILES AND RASPS. 

Great Wester J 75 and 5 per «tnt. 

Disston 70 " 10 •■ 

Arcade 73 " 5 " 

Kearney * Foot 70 " 10 " 

American 75 " 5 " 

McClellan 70 " 5 " 

Eagle 70 10 and 5 " 

Nicholson 70 " 10 " 

Heller 60 " 10 " 

Royal & Keystone 80 p.c atd 80 and 10 p c 
Black Diamond, 60 to 6J and 10 per cent. 
Jowitt's, English list, 25 to 27% per cent. 

FORKS. 
Hay, manure, etc., dis., 50 and 10 per cent, 
revised list. 

GLASS— Window— Box Price. 

Star D. Diamond 

Size United Per Per Per Per 

Inches. 50 ft. 100 ft 50 ft. 100 ft 

Under26 2 15 4 15 .... 6 00 

26to40 2 30 4 45 .... 6 65 



41to50 4 85 .... 7 50 

51 to 60 5 15 .... 8 50 

61to70 5,50 .... 9 50 

71to80 6 00 .... 10 50 

81 to 85 6 50 .... 11 70 

86to90 14 CO 

91to95 15 50 

99tol00 18 00 

GAUGES 
Marking, Mortise, Etc. 
Stanley's dis. 50 to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 
Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33, each. . . 1 65 2 40 
HALTERS. 

Rope, % per gross 

" % '• 9 00 

" %to% 14 00 

Leather, 1 in., per doz 3 87% 4 00 

" IViin., " 5 15 5 20 

Web, —per doz 187 2 45 

HAMMERS. 
Nail 
Maydole's, dis 5 to 10 per cent. Can. dis. 
25 to 27% per cent. 

Tack. 

Magnetic, per doz 1 10 1 20 

Sledge. 

Canadian, per lb 07% 08X 

Ball Pean. 
English and Can., per lb.... 22 25 
HANDLES. 

Axe, per doz. net 150 2 00 

Store door, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Fork. 
C. t B., dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 

Hoe. 
C. 4 B., dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 
Saw. 

American, per doz 1 00 1 25 

Plane. 

American, per gross 3 15 3 75 

Hammer and Hatchet. 
Canadian, 40 per cent. 

Cross-Cut Saws. 

Canadian, per pair 13^ 

HANGERS. doz. pairs. 

Steel barn door 5 85 6 00 

Stearns , 4 inch 5 00 

" 5 inch 6 50 

Lane's covered- 
No. 11, 5-ft. run .. v 8 40 

No. 11%, 10-ft.run 10 80 

No. 12, 10-ft.run 12 60 

No. 14, 15-ft. run 2100 

Lane's O.N.T. track, per foot. ... 4% 

HARVEST TOOL8. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 
HATCHETS. 
Canadian, dis. 40 to 42% per cent. 

HINGES. 
Blind, Parker's, dis. 50 and 10 to 60 per cent. 

Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb 06% 

" 5-in., " .... 06'/« 

" " 6-in., " 06 

" 8-in., " .... 05*4 
" 10-in., " ...: 05% 
Light T and strap, dis. 65 and 5 per cent. 
Screw hook and hinge— 

6 to 10 in., per 100 lbs 3 93 

12 in. up, per 100 lbs 3 00 

Per gro. pairs. 

Spring 12 00 

HOES. 
Garden, Mortar, etc., dis. 50 and 10 p.o. 

Planter, per doz 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE 

Discount 45 and 5 per cent 

HOOKS. 
Cast Iron. 

Bird Cage, per doz 50 110 

Clothes Line, per doz 27 63 

Harness, per doz 72 88 . 

Hat and Coat, per gross 1 00 3 00 ' 

Chandelier, per doz 50 100 

Wrought Iron. <b 

Wrought Hooks and Staples, Can., di<. 
47% per cent. 

Wire. 
Hat and Coat, discount 45 per cent. 

Belt, per 1,000 60 

Screw, bright, dis. 55 per oent. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



31 



u 



abbitt Metal 



IT IS THE 
BEST MADE. 




For 
Paper and Pulp 
Mills, Saw and 
Wood Working 
Machinery, Cotton 
and Silk Mills, 
Dynamos, Marine 
Engines, and all 
kinds of 
Machinery 
Bearings. 



Wire, Triangular and Bar Solder, Pig Tin, Lead, Ingot Copper, Ingot Brass, Antimony, Aluminum, Bismuth, Zinc Spelter, 
Phosphor Tin, Phosphor Bronze, Nickle, etc., always in stock. 



Factories 



332 William St., MONTREAL, QUE. 
and SYRACUSE, N.Y. 



Syracuse Smelting Works 



O 



HORSE NAILS 
"C'brand 50 and 7%p.c.off new li tlOval- 
"M" brand 50, 10 and 5 per cent. i head 
Countersunk 60 per cent 

HORSESHOES 

F.O.B. Montreal. 
No. 2 No. 1. 
Iron Shoes. and and 

larger, smaller. 
Light, medium, and heavy. 3 50 3 75 

Snow shoes 3 75 4 00 

Steel Shoes. 

Light 3 60 3 85 

Featherweight (all sizes) 4 85 4 85 

F.O.B. Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Guelph, 10c. per keg additional. 

Toe weighc steel shoes 6 70 

JAPANNED WARE. 
Discount, 45 and 5 p c. off list, June 1899 
ICE PICKS. 

Star per doz 3 00 3 25 

KETTLES. 
Brass spun, 7% p.c. dis. off new list. 

Copper, per In 30 50 

American, 60 and 10 to 65 and 5 p.c. 

KEY8. 
Lock, Can., dis., 45 p.c. 
Cabinet, trunk, and padlock, 

Am. per gross 60 

KNOBS. 
Door, Japanned and N.P., per 

doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin, per doz 2 75 3 25 

Bronze Genuine, per doz 6 00 9 00 

Shutter, porcelain, F. & L. 

screw, per gross 1 30 4 00 

White door knobs— per doz. 1 25 

HAY KNIVES. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 

LAMP WICKS. 
Discount, 60 per cent. 

LANTERNS. 

Cold Blast, per doz. . , 7 00 

No. 3 "Wright's" 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner 4 00 

Dashboard, cold blast 9 00 

No. 5 75 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

Porcelain lined, per doz. 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized 187 3 85 

King, wood 2 75 2 90 

King, glass 4 00 4 50 

Allglass , 120 130 

LINES. 

Fish, per gross 105 2 50 

Chalk " 1 90 7 40 

LOCKS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 
Russel * Erwin, per doz.... 3 00 3 25 

Cabinet. 
Eagle, dis. 30 p.c. 

Padlock 
English and Am., perdoz.... 50 6 00 
Scandinavian, " .... 1 00 2 40 

Eagle, dis. 20 to 25 p.c 

MACHINE SCREWS. Iron and Brass. 
Flat head discount 25 p.c 
Round Head discount 20 p.o. 
MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths' perdoz 1 25 1 50 

Carpenters', hickory, per doz 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Vitae, per doz 3 85 5 00 

Caulking each 60 2 00 

MATTOCKS. 

Canadian, perdoz 5 50 6 50 

MEAT CUTTERS. 
American, dis. 25 to 30 p.c. 
German, 15 per cent. 

MILK CAN TRIMMINGS. 
Disoount, 25 per cent. 

NAILS. 

Quotations are ; Cut. Wire. 

2d and 3d 83 45 $3 85 

3d 3 10 .152 

4and5d 2 85 3 35 

6and7d 2 75 3 20 

8and9d 2 60 3 00 

lOand 12d 2 55 2 95 

16and20d 2 50 2 90 

30, 40, 50 and 60d. (base) 2 45 2 85 

Wire nails in carlots are $2.77% 

Galvanizing 2c. per lb. net extra. 

Steel Cut Nails 10c. extra. 

Miscellaneous wire nails, dis. 70 and 10 p. c. 



Coopers' nails, dis. 30 per cent. 
Flour barrel nails, dis 25 percent 

NAIL PULLERS. 
German and American 185 3 50 

NAIL SETS 
Square, round, and octagon 

per gross 3 38 4 00 

Diamond 12 00 15 00 

NETTING. 
Poultry, 55 per cent for McMullen's 

OAKUM. Per 100 lb. 

Navy 6 00 

U. S. Navy 7 25 

OIL. 

Water White (U.S.) 16% 

Prime White (U.S ) 15% 

Water White (Can.) 15 

Prime White(Can.) 14 

OILERS. 
McClary's Model galvan. oil 

can, with pump, 5 gal., 

per doz 10 00 

Zinc and tin, dis. 50, 50 and 10. 

Copper, per doz 1 25 3 50 

Brass, " 1 50 3 50 

Malleable, dis. 25 per cent. 

GALVANIZED PAILS. 
Dufferin pattern pails, dis. 45 p.c. 
Flaring pattern, discount 45 per cent. 
Galvanized washtubs, discount 45 per cent. 

PIECED WARE. 
Discount 40 per cent off list, June, 1899. 
10-qt. Har'ng sap buckets, dis. 45 p.c. 
P, lu and 14-qt. fl ring pai s, dis. 45 p.c. 
Creamer catis, dis. 45 p c. 
PICKS. 

Perdoz 6 00 9 00 

PICTURE NAILS. 

Porcelain head, per gross 175 3 00 

Brass head " .... 40 1 00 

PICTURE WIRE. 
Tin and gilt, discount 75 p c. 
PLANES. 
Wood, bench, Canadian dis. 50 per cent. 

American dis. 50. 
Wood, fancy Canadian or American 7% 
to 40 per cent. 

PLANE IRONS. 

English, per doz 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 
Button's Genuine per doz pairs, dis. 37% 

40 p.c. 
Button's Imitation, per doz.. 5 00 9 00 

German, perdoz 60 2 60 

PLUMBERS BRASS GOODS. 
Compression work, discount, 60 per cent. 
Fuller's work, discount 65 per cent. 
Rough stops and stop and waste cocks, dis- 
count, 60 per cent. 
Jenkins disk globe and angle valves, dis- 
count, 55 per cent. 
Standard valves, discount, 60 per per cent. 
Jenkins radiator valves discount 55 percent. 
" " " standard, dis, 60 p.c. 

Quick opening valves discount, 60 p.c. 

No. 1 compression bath cock 2 00 

No. 4 " " •' 2 00 

No. 7, Fuller's 2 50 

No 4%, " 3 00 

POWDER. 
Velox Smokeless Shotgun Powder. 

1001b. orless 85 

1,000 lb. or more 80 

Net 30 days. 
PRESSED SPIKES. 
Discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse, per doz £5 100 

Axle 22 33 

Screw 27 1 00 

Awning 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 1 80 3 60 

Canadian pitcher spout 140 2 10 

PUNCHES. 

Saddlers', per doz 1 00 1 85 

Conductors', " 9 00 15 00 

Tinners' solid, per set 00 72 

" hollow, per inch 00 100 



RANGE BOILERS. 
Galvanized, 3 gallons 7 CO 

35 " 8 25 

40 " D 50 

Copper, 30 " 22 00 

n 35 " 26 00 

40 " 30 00 

Discount off Copper Boilers 10 per cent. 

RAKES. 
Cast steel and malleable, 50, 10 and 5 p.c. 
Wood, 25 per cent. 

RAZORS. 

per doz. 

Elliot's 4 00 18 00 

Geo. Butler* Co. 's 4 00 18 00 

Boker's 7 50 11 00 

KingCutter 12 5) 5J 00 

Wade & Butcher's 3 60 10 00 

Theile & Quack's 7 00 12 00 

REAPING HOOKS. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 
REGISTERS. 

Discount 40 per cent. 

RIVETS AND BURRS. 
Iron Rivets, black and tinned, discount 60 

and lu per cent. 
Iron Burrs, liscount 55 per cent. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in 1-lb. cartons, %c. 

per lb. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in %-lb. cartons, to. 

per lb. 
Copper Rivets & Burrs, 35 and 5 p.c. dis. 

and cartons, 1c. per lb. extra, net. 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets 
%-lb. cartons, lc. per lb. 
RIVET SETS 
Canadian, dis. 35 to 37% per cent. 
ROPE ETC. 

Sisal. Manila. 
7-16 in. and larger, per lb 10 13% 

%in 11 14% 

Vt, and 5-16 in 15% 

Cotton, 3-16 inch and larger 16 

" 5-32 inch 21 

" Vsinch 22% 

Russia Deep Sea 15% 

Jute 8 

Lath Yarn 9% 

New Zealand Rope . 10 

RULES. 
Boxwood, dis. 75 and 10 p.c. 
Ivory, dis. 37% to 40 p,c. 

SAD IRONS. per set. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished 62% 

" No. 50, nickle-plated 67% 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 

Dominion Flint Paper, 47% pe cent. 

B & A. sand, 40 and 5 per cent. 

Emery, 40 per cent. 

Garrjet(Rurton'j»), 5 to 10 p.c. advance on list. 

SAP SPOUTS. 
Bronzed iron with hooks, perdoz... H 50 

SAWS. 
Hand Disston's, dis. 12% p.c. 
S. & D., 40 per cent. 

Crosscut, Disston's, per ft.... 35 55 
S. & D., dis. 35 p.c. on Nos. 2 and3. 

Hack, complete, each 75 2 75 

' frame only 75 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional, per 100 lbs 2 75 3 00 

Solid, " 2 00 2 25 

SASH CORD. 

er lb 23 30 

SAW 8ETS. 
"Lincoln," perdoz 6 50 

SCALES. 
Standard, 45 p.c. 
Champion, 65 p c. 
Spring Balances, 10 p.o. 
Fairbanks Standard, 35 p.c. 
" Dominion, 55 p.c. 

" Richelieu, 55 p.c. 

SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's per doz 65 100 

SCREWS 
Wood, F. H., brightand steel, S7% and lOp.c. 
Wood R. H., " dis. 82% and "10 p.o. 
" F. H., brass, dis. 80 and 10 p.c. 



Wood, R. H., " dis. 75 and 10 p.c. 
" F.H., bronze, dis. 75 p.c. 
" R.H. " 70 p.c. 

Drive Screws, 87% and 10 per cent. 

Bench, wood, perdoz 3 25 4 01 

" iron. " 4 25 5 75 

Set, Case hardened, 60 per cent. 
Square Cap, 50 and 5 per cent. 
Hexagon Cap, 45 per ceni. 
SCYTHES. 

Per doz, net 9 00 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 

SHEARS. 
Bailey Cuilery Co., full nickeled, dis. 60 p.c 
Seymour's, dis. 50 and 10 p.o. 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 
Canadian, dis. 40 and 5 per cent. 

SINKS. 
Steel and galvanized, discount 45 percent. 

SNAPS. 
Harness, German, dis. 25 p.c. 

Lock, Andrews' 4 50 11 50 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

1, l%lb., perlb 37 

2 lb. or over, per lb 34 

SQUARES. 

Iron, No. 493, perdoz 2 40 2 55 

" Mo. 494, " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, dis. 60. 10 and 5 p.c. 
Try and bevel, dis. 50 to 52% p.c. 
STAMPED WARE. 
Plain, dis. , 75 and 12% p.c. off revised list 
Retinned, dis., 75 p.c. off revised list. 
STAPLES. 

Galvanized 3 50 4 00 

Plain 3 25 3 75 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent. 
Poultry netting staples, 40 per cent. 
STOCKS AND DIES. 
American dis. 25 p.c. 

STONE. Per lb. 

Washita 28 60 

Hindostan 06 07 

" slip 09 09 

Labrador 13 

" Axe 15 

Turkey 50 

Arkansas 00 150 

Water-of-Ayr 00 10 

Scythe, per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind .2 in, 40 to 200 lb.per ton .... 25 00 

" under 40 lb " 28 00 

Grind, under 2 in. thick " 29 00 

STOVE PIPES. 

5 and 6 inch Per 100 lengths 7 00 

7 inch " " .... 7 50 

ENAMELINE STOVE POLISH. 

No. 4—3 dozen in case, net oasn $4 80 

No. 6—3 dozen in case, " .... 8 40 
TACKS BRADS, ETC. 

Per cent 

Strawberry box tacks , bulk 75 & 10 

Cheese-box tacks , blued 80 & 12% 

Trunk tacks, black and tinned ... .85 
Carpet tacks, blued 80 & 15 

" " tinned 80&20 

" " (in kegs) 40 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only ..80 

" % weights 60 

Swedes cut tacks, blued and tinned— 

In bulk 80 4 10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk 85, 12% & 12% 

" brush, blued & tinned, bulk. .70 
" gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 & 12% 

Zino tacks 35 

Leather carpet tacks 55 

Copper tacks 50 

Copper nails KS % 

Trunk nails, blacK 65 and 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout nails, blued 65 and 5 

Chair nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing 40 

Picture frame points 10 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 



32 



CANADfAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



PITTSBURGH, 

U. S. A. 



MANUFACTURERS 
OF" 



STANDARD CHAIN CO., 

CHAIN 

Proof Coll, B.B., B.B.B., Crane. Dredge Chain, Trace Chains. Cow Ties etc. 
""ESS."™' -Canadian Representatives- £,&£?"■ 4 C0 ' 



OF ALL KINDS. 



t 



Montreal. 

For Provinces of Ontario and Quebec. 



For otber Provinces. 



Lining lacks, in bulk 15 

" " solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in dozens only 60 

Tin oapped trunk nails 15 

Zinc glazier's points VU"' M A 

Double pointed tacks, papers 90 and 10 

bulk 40 

TAPE LINES. 
English, ass Bkin, per doz ... 2 75 5 00 
English, Patent Leather.... 5 50 9 75 

Chesterman's each 90 2 85 

steel, each ... . 080 800 
THERMOMETERS. 
Tin case and dairy, dis. 75 to 75 and 10 p.o. 

TRAPS. (Steel.) 
Same, Newhouse, dis. 25 p.c. 
Game, H. & N„ P. S. 4 W., 65 p.c. 
Game, steel, 72Vi, 75 p.o. 

TROWELS. 
Disston's discount 10 per cent. 

German, per doz 4 75 6 00 

S. & D., discount 35 per cent. 
TWINES. 

Bag, Russian, per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply 18% 

•• " 4-ply 2354 

Mattress, per lb 33 45 

Staging, " 27 35 



VISES. 

Wright's 13% 

Brook's 12% 

Pine Vise, Hinge, No. 1 3 50 

No 2 5 50 

Saw Vise 4 5) 9 00 

ENAMELLED WARE. 
White, Princess, Turquoise, Blue and White, 

discount 50 per cent. 
Diamond, Famous, Premier, 50 and 10 p.c. 
Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent, 50, 10 

and 10 per cent. 

WIRE. 

BrasB wire, 50 to 50 and 254 Per cent, off the 

list. 
Copper wire, 45 and 10 per cent, net cash 30 
days, f.o.b. factory. 
Smooth Steel Wire, i9 quoted at the 
following net selling prices: 
No. 6 to 8 gauge $2 90 



2 8J 
2 87 
2 90 

2 95 

3 15 
3 37 
3 50 
3 65 



Other size 3 of plain wire outside of Nos. 9, 
10, 11, 12 and 13. and other varieties of 
plain wire remain at $2.8) base with 



extras as bef.ire. The prices for Nos 9- 
to 13 include the charge of 1 c. 
for oiling. Extras net per 100 lb.: 
Coppered wire, 60c— tinned wire, 82— 
oiling, 10c— special hay-bailing wire, 30c. 
—spring wire, $1— best steel wire, 75c— 
bright soft drawn, 15c— in 50 and 100-lb. 
bundles net, 10c— in 25-lb. bundles net 
15c— packed in casks or cases, 15c— 
bagging or papering, 10c 

Fine Steel Wire, dis. 1754 per cent. 
List of extras : In 100-lh. lots : No. 
17, S5-N0.18, 85.50-No. 19. *6-No. 20, 
$6.65-No. 21, $7-No. 22, $7.30-No. 23, 
7.65-No. 24, 88-No. 25, «9-No. 26, 
89.50-No. 27, 810-No. 28. $11 No 29. 
$12-No. 30, 813-No. 31 , $14-No. 32. «1E 
No. 33, 816-No. 34, 817. Extras net- 
tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, 82— Nob. 26-31 
84— Nos. 32-34, $B. Coppered, 5c— oil 
ing, 10c— in 25-l» . bundles,15c— in 5 ana 
10-lb. bundles. 25c— in 1-lb. hanks, 50c — 
in %-lb. hanks, 75c- in 54-lb. hankB, $1— 
packed in casks orcases, 15c— bagging or 
papering, 10c. 

Galvanized Wire, per 100 lb.— Nos. 6,7.8. $3 50 
to 83 8"— No. 9, 82.85 to $3.15— No. 10 
$3.60 to $3.95— No. 11, $3 70 to $4.10-No 
12, 83 to 83 30- No. 13, 83.10 to S3 41— 
No. 14. 84.10 to $4.50-No. 15. 84.60 to 
85.05-No. 16. $4.85 to 85 35. Baee sizes, 
Nos. 6 to 9, $2 5754 f-n b. Cleveland. 

Clothes Line Wire, solid 7 strand, No. 17 



$4.25; No. 18, J2.65; No. 19, $2.35, f.o.b. 
Hamilt n, Toronto, Mon'real. 

WIRE FENCING. FOB. 

Toronto 

Galvanized barb 3(5 

Galvanized, plain twist 3(5 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $2.8254 
in less than carlots, and $2.70 in carlots. 

WIRE CLOTH. 
Painted Screen, per 100 sq. ft., net.. 1 35 
WASTE COTTON. per lb. 

Colored 454 to 5 

White, aoco-ding to quality 654 to 7% 

500-lb bale lots shaded. 

WRENCHES. 
Acme, 35 to 37H per cent. 
Agricultural, 60 p.c 
Coe's Genuine, dis. 20 to 25 p.c. 

Towers' Engineer, each 2 00 7 00 

" 8., per doz 5 80 6 00 

G. 4 K > Pipe, per doz 3 40 

Burrell's Pipe, each 3 00 

Pocket . per doz 25 2 90 

WRINGERS 

Leader per doz. $30 33 00 

Royal Canadian.. " 26 00 28 00 

Royal American., " 26 00 28 00 

Sampson " 30 00 

Terms 4 months, or 3 p.c. 30 days. 
WROUGHT IRON WASHERS. 
Canadian make, discount, 40 per cent. 



ADVERTISING inWESTERN CANADA 

will be Carefully, Efficiently, and Promptly 
ttended to, by 

The Roberts Advertising Agency, 

WINNIPEG CANADA. 









"KEY CABINET" to hand and we are 
pleased with it." JOHN MILLEN & SON, 

Montreal. 
Cabinets for all kinds of goods fitted with 

BENNETT'S PATENT SHELF BOX 

Made tj Order. 




For particulars apply to the patentee 
and manufacturer. 

J. S. BENNETT, 20 Sheridan Ave., TORONTO 



THE ADAMS STOVE PIPE REGISTER. 



Design Patented 
June 29, 1897. 

Design Patented 
August 31, 1897. 

Made by 

The Adams 
Company 

Dubuque, 
Iowa, U.S.A. 






"THE EMLYN" SAW BENCH 

Made in 6 sizes. Best value obtainable. Specially 
designed for export. With or without "Emlyn ' 
Patent Guard, so'e maker — 



CHARLES D. PHILLIPS, 

Cables — Emlyn Engineering Works, 

" Machinery," Newport. 



Newpokt, Mon .England. 



IF THE WORDS 

"Diindas Axe" 



are stamped on an Axe, you can 
rely on its being the best that 
can be made. 



DUNDAS AXE WORKS 

Dundas, Ont. 

Buy the Best. 




HERCULES 

Sash Cord. 

Star Brand Cotton Rope 

Star Brand Cotton Glotbes Lines 

Star Brand Cotton Twine 

For Sale by all Wholesale Dealers 



BUSINESS 
NEWS 

of any kind that is of value to business men 
supplied by our Bureau. We can give you 
market quotations from any town in Can- 
ada, reports from the city markets, stock 
quotations, etc. You can get commercial 
news from any Canadian paper through us. 

Write us, giving us particulars of what 
you want and where you want it from, and 
we will quote you prices by return. 

"Clippings from any Canadian paper on 
any subject," 

CANADIAN PRESSTUPPINE BUREAU, 

M2 McGill Street, MONTREAL, QUE. 
Telephone Main 12SS. 
10 Front St. Eaat, Toronto. Telephone 2148. 



75 YBARS. 



CELEBRATED 



ESTABLISHED 1825. 



75 YEARS. 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS. 



Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers, Scissors, 
Tinners' Snips, etc. 




ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST. 



R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. Bgw" A EK.rE2 *a?° Ch *" ber, 8t 

Not connected with any Shear Combination. 

CHAS. F. CLARK, President. JARED CHITTENDEN, Treasurer. 

...ESTABLISHED 1840... 



Capital and Surplus, $1,500,000. Offices Throughout the Civilized World. 

Executive Offices : Nos. 346 and 348 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers information that reflects the financial condition and 
the controlling circumstances of every seeker of mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the 
merchants, by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information no 
effort is spared, and no reasonable expense considered too great, that the results may justify its claim as an 
authority on all matters affecting commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have 
been steadily extended, and it furnishes information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized 
world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, jobbing 
and manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporations. 
Specific terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of its offices. Correspondence Invited. 



-OFFICES IN CANADA 



HALIFAX, N.S. 
OTTAWA. ONT. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 
QUEBEC, QUE. 
VICTORIA, B.C. 



LONDON, ONT. 
ST. JOHN, N.B. 
WINNIPEG, MAN. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



THOS. C. IRVING, Gen, Man. Western Canada, Toronto. JOHN A. FULTON, Gen. Man, Eastern Canada, Montreal, 



PERSONS addressing advertisers 
will kindly mention having 
seen their advertisement in 
Canadian Hardware and Metal 
merchant. 



L 



Every Description 
Shap e and C olors 

ABELS 



Stock Labels for Hardware trade 
LEVY «Sr CO., 19 Leader Le..TOROINTO 



ASPINALL'S 

0. White for Inside, 

Indian White— Outside 

for 

Decorators' Use. 

Imperial Gallons 

aud V£-Gallons. 




Free from Poisonous White Lead. Colours 
Perfect. The original English make as supplied 
to Royalty. 

Ontario and the East, R. C, Jamleson &. Co., 13 St. John 
Street, Montreal, Winnipeg and District, J, H, Ashdown. 
Winnipeg. 



i 

1 1 ■•*. it 




Inc. IMS 



Black Diamond File Works 



; 6. & H. Barnett Company 

\ PHILADELPHIA 

Medals 




I 



Awarded 
By JURORS " 

! International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 




»'%*%%%%'%%%%%%'%'%'%'%'»%'%'*%*'%%'%' 



1901 





E. '901 



We manufacture the most popular and best 
selling lines of Garden Hose in Canada. Our "Mal- 
tese Cross" brand we confidently recommend as 
the finest Garden Hose on the market. 

We have other grades not quite so expensive, 
but good reliable brands, viz. : "Lion" (the popular 
medium-priced hose), "King" "Sun" and "Leader." 

Our "Kinkproof " (wire wound) hose is wired 
by a special process controlled solely by ourselves, 
and is so constructed that it may be cut at any 
wind of the wire without loosening or uncoiling, 
the wire being self-gripping throughout each 
length. 

The Cutta Pergha and Rubber Mfg. Cd. 

OF TORONTO, LIMITED. 

Head Office and Warerooms- 
49-61-63 West Front St., 

TORONTO, C anada. 

Factories— I 15-165 West Lodge Ave. 
124-148 O'Hara Ave. 



American Sheet Steel Co., 



NEW YORK. 



Galvanized Steel Sheets, 

Black Steel Sheets, 

Dewees Wood Co.'s Polished Sheets. 



American Tin Plate Co., 

NEW YORK. 

Coke, Charcoal, and Terne Plates. 



CORDAGE 



ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



Manila Rope 
Sisal Rope 
Jute Rope 
Russian Rope 
Marline 
Housellne 
Hambroline 
Clotheslines 
Tarred Hemp Rope 
White Hemp Rope 
Bolt Rope 
Hide Rope 
Halyards 
Deep Sealine 
Ratline 
Plow Lines 



Lathyarn 
Shlngleyarn 
Bale Rope 
Lariat Rope 
Hemp Packing 
Italian Packing 
Jute Packing 
Drilling Cables 
Spunyarn 
Pulp Cord 
Lobster Marl In 
Paper Cord 
Cheese Cord 
Hay Rope 
Fish Cord 
Sand Lines 



"RED THREAD" Transmission Rope from the finest quality Manila 
hemp obtainable, laid in tallow. 



PRICES ON APPLICATION TO 

B. &S.H. THOMPSON & CO' Y 

28 St. Sulpice St., MONTREAL, 



Selling Agents for Canada. 



CONSUMERS CORDAGE COMPANY, 



"Limited 



Western Ontario Representative— 

WM. B. STEWART. 
Tel 94. 27 Front St. West, TORONTO. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 



Copper, Tin, Antimony, Etc 

LANGWELL S BABBITT 
Montreal. 




The Weekly Organ of the Hardware. Metal, Heating, Plumbing and Contracting Trades In Canada. 



VOL. XIII. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, JULY 20, 1901. 



NO. 29 



"THIBET ANTI-FRICTION METAL. 



'Tandem" Metals are better than 
any other lor their purpose, 
and are, therefore : 

The Most Economical. Resistance Reducing. 
The Least Wearing. Journal Preserving. 

The Most Durable. Power Increasing. 

^Friction Preventing. Lubricant Saving. 

A QUALITY 

For Heaviest Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Heavy Pressure and High Speed, 

B QUALITY 

For Heavy Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Medium Pressure and High Speed, 

C QUALITY 

For Medium Pressure and High Speed 
or Low Pressure and Highest Speed. 

Sole Agents : 

LAMPLOUGH & McNAUGHTON, 59 St. Sulpice Street, MONTREAL. 

THE TANDEM SMELTING SYNDICATE, LIMITED 

The largest smelters of Anti-Friction Queen Victoria St., London, E.C. 

Metals in Europe. 





"FLEUR DE LIS" is not a second quality 
iron. It is " Queen's Head " quality— every 
sheet guaranteed — " Queen's Head " weights 
and flatness, but galvanized the same as ordin- 
ary brands. If you don't require the best 
galvanizing, you are safe with " Fleur de Lis," 
and price is low. 



JOHN LYSAGHT, Limited, Makers, A. C. LESLIE & CO., MONTREAL, 
BRISTOL, ENG. Managers Canadian Branch, 



» i 



GOOD POINTS. 

The Safford Radiator 

has a score of them, but there is one which success has accented — 
it's simplicity. Like all other great inventions, the "SAFFORD" 
is ingeniously simple. Ir is connected at the joints by patent 
screw nipples. That's what made the "SAFFORD" suc- 
cessful — no bolts, no packing — just a plain screwed 
connection. This means that the "SAFFORD" is posi- 
tively non-leakable — positively durable. Of all Radiators 
the "SAFFORD" alone possesses this simple device. 

The "SAFFORD" is made in many designs and 
heights, and is always graceful in its lines and bulk. It 
is made to fit- in corners, to circle pillars, and for bay 
windows. 

We will be pleased to give you any information you desire. Remember, we are the 
Largest Radiator Manufacturers under the British Flag. 

THE DOMINION RADIATOR COMPANY, Limited, TORONTO. 




■Ju ^rW* t^w "JW tBf •«> iff> *y "> ~<r *> ™> *y #" tp ^^f "A ~y# "Jo wW wWWIvwWvlWvfW 



Lawn j LflWN SEATS 
Mowers 



... AND ... 



AND 

VASES. 



Garden 



Hose 



Special Mowers 

O FOR 

Golf Grounds and 
Tennis Courts. 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



LIMITED 



WRITE FOR PRICES. "ORON" "O 



Galvanized Sheets 

"Gordon Crown" Brand. *. 



PATENT LEVELLED. 



Enquiries solicited for stock and import shipment. 



SAMUEL, SONS & BENJAMIN, - - LONDON AND LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND 

M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin & Co. 

General Importers and Exporters and Metal Merchants 

27 Wellington Street West, - - TORONTO, ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



BURMAN & SONS' ouSrs 



Established 1871. 



for Horsemen 



BIRMINGHAM, ENG. » d »"»"> 




NO. 297. 



NO. 3 POWER CLIPPER, with "Wrist Joint." 

(Tbe Czar of Russia 
As supplied to-; The King of Denmark. 
(Earl Roberts, Etc., Etc. 





THE "LEOPOLD" TOILET 



THE "WARWICK" 

CLIPPER. 

Cuts over throe tooth. 

As supplied to 

His Majesty's 
War Department. 



SEND FOR PRICE LIST AND TERMS. 

DELORME BROS., Agents, D *s b t r r 7.°t ,M Montreal 



HOSE 




WATER 

STEAM 

AIR 

FIRE 

BABCOCK 



SUCTION 

ACID 

OIL 

SODA WATER 

HIGH-PRESSURE 



Our Patent Seamless Tube is, without doubt, 

the only perfect construction. 

The Canadian Rubber Co., 

oapital - - SI, 500, OOOOO. 

Montreal. Toronto. Winnipeg. 



Lightning, Gem 
Blizzard . . . 



FREEZERS 






ARE 



Well Advertised 
In Demand 
Easily Sold 
Satisfactory in Use 
Of Known Reputation 



HAVE 

Cedar Pails with Electric Welded Wire Hoops 
Cans of Heavy Tin with Drawn Steel Bottoms 
AUTOMATIC Twin Scrapers 
"The Ice Cream Freezer Book" tells all about 
these and our other Freezers, mailed free 



EXCEL IN 



Easy Running 
Quick Freezing 
Economy 
Convenience 
Practical Results 



North Bros. Mfg. Co., """"ffi 1 "' Pa ' 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



FOR WARM AIR HEATING. 

Our many lines of coal and wood furnaces offer a range of sizes and styles 
that afford complete satisfaction — everywhere. 



OUR LATEST CONSTRUCTION" 



"The Oxforc 





Oxford 400 Series, Portable. 



are unequalled in excellence — combining enormous power with gratifying economy. 
Their improved points of construction will interest every practical dealer or buyer. 

They are made with Steel Plate Radiators, and supplied either portable, as shown, 
or stationary for brick setting. 

Our Little Ox and Oxford Furnaces fOP WOOd are already in favorable use all over the country, their incomparable 
popularity having been gained by superior merit. 

Consult our catalogue for full information about these splendid lines — to handle them will insure the most satisfying 
trade possible. 



HE GURNEY FOUNDRY CO, Limited 



TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



VANCOUVER, 



THE GURNEY-MASSEY CO, LIMITED, MONTREAL. 



' 'T* 



WE HAVE A COMPLETE STOCK. 

Bright Goods, Door Pulls and 
Hat and Coat Hooks. 

ALL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 




BWWs^ 



Our Mills are in full operation, and we are in 
position to handle any requirements the trade may have. 

YOUR ORDERS SOLICITED FOR 

Plain, Galvanized and Barb Wire, Wire Nails, 
Wood Screws, Copper and Brass Wire, Bright 
and Galvanized Fence Staples, Netting, Blind and 
Bed Staples, Jack Chain, Cotter Pins. 

Prices quoted on application. 

Dominion Wire Manufacturing Co. 

MONTREAL and TORONTO. 



THE NEW BALDWIN I 



DRY AIR CLEANABLE 



REFRIGERATOR. ! 

135 Modern Varieties. Ash, Oak and Soft-wood Finishes 

METAL, PORCELAIN, SPRUCE LININGS. 

BALDWIN Jf 

Positive Circulation- 
Sanitary— Odorless. 
Latest Cleanahle Fea- 
tures—The Strongest 
and Best System of 
Patent Removable 
Metal Air-Flues. 
Air-Tight Lever Locks 
Ball-Bearing Casters. 
Swing Base — in and 

out. 
Rubber around Doors 
and Lids, making 
them doubly air-tight. 
Handsome Designs. 
Moderate Prices. 



Built in the newest, largest and best equipped refrigerator plant in the East 
run all the year round on refrigerators exclusively; stock goods; special 
refrigerators and coolers in sections. 

Handsome Trade Catalogue Ready. 

Baldwin Refrigerator Co., 

BURLINGTON, VERMONT. 




I 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



LEWIS BROS. & CO. 



Wholesale 
Hardware 



St. Su.pice Street, MONTREAL. 

Guns, Rifles and Ammunition. 




All Makes of Hammerless Guns. 





^r 



Write for our 56 Page Gun Catalogue. 
Mail Orders Shipped Same Day as Received. 



Brass or Paper Shells, Loaded or Empty. 

© LEWIS BROS. & CO., Montreal. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Henry Rogers, 
Sons & Co. 

Wolverhampton, England. 

Manufacturers " f t^^ 

"Union Jack" Galvanized Sheets 

Canada and Tin Plates 

Black Sheets 

Sleigh Shoes and Tyre Steel 

Coil Chain, Hoop Iron 

Sheet and Pig Lead 

Sheet Zinc 



Quotations can be had from 

Canadian Office : 

6 St. Sacrament St., • MONTREAL 

F. A. YORK, Manager. 



h 

Z 

o 




O 

o 

H 
X 

o 

■H 






z 
o 

h 
-J 

I 

< 
Z 



KNOX HENRY 

Heavy Hardware and Metal Broker 
Room 32, Canada Life Bldg., MONTREAL. 




Samples sent free on application. 

HORSE NAILS-" C" Brand Horse - Nails 
Canada Horse Nail Co. 

"BRASSITE" GOOD8 — Qunn Castor Co. 
Limited, Birmingham, Kug, 






THE MOWER 



If you keep the weeds cut so 
they do not go to seed, and cut 
your grass without breaking the 
small feeders of roots, the grass 
will become thick and weeds will 

disappear. The Clipper will do 
it. 



THAT WILL KILL 
ALL THE WEEDS 
IN YOUR LAWNS. 



CANADIAN PATENT FOR SALE. 
SEND FOR CATALOGUE AND PRICES. 




Clipper Lawn Mower Co., 



NORRISTOWN, 
PA. 




This eight-foot Brake bends 22-gauge utoo 
and lighter, straight and true. 

Price, $60 

Very handy header attachment, $15 extra 

if required. 

Send for circulars and testimonials to 

The Double Truss Cornice 
Brake Co. §5S5£S25t92L 



The Latest and Best. 

H. & R. Automatic Ejecting 
Single Gun. 



Model 
1900. 



Steel and Twist Barrels 
in 30 and 32-inch. 

12 Gauge. 




Harrington & Richardson Arms Co. 

Worcester, Mass., U.S.A. 

Descriptive Catalogue on request. 




LONDON FENCE 
MACHINES 



Lead on Every Point. 



London Safety Tackle Blocks are equally efficient for 
stretching Coiled Spring Wire and for use as a Hoisting 
Block. They are Ai and rapid sellers. 

TOWNSEND (Lever) STRETCHERS 
BERNARD CUTTING PLIERS 

Only one agency for our machines in each town. Get 
our prices, terms and discounts. 

Coiled Spring and other Fence Wire at right prices to t 
the trade. 



London Fence Machine Co., London, Can. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ESTABLISHED I860. 



INCORPORATED 1895 



1901 Style 




PATENT 
APPLIED FOR 



"Empire" 
Stove Pipe 

Made in 5. 6 and 7 inches- 
Nested in Crates of 25 each. 

Simplest Stove Pipe to put together yet made — only tools 
required are a pair of hands. 

Where time is an object, we will guarantee that six of our 
"EMPIRE" STOVE PIPES can be put together in the 
same length of time as one of various other makes, and 
will stay put together. 



THE THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Limited, MONTREAL, QUE, 




"Snterprise" Cherry <Jtoners 

The Nos. 17 arid 1 8 are constructed with a patented 
fj&fplj Regulating Device the simplicity of which makes it 
easier to adjust the machine for the different sizes of 
Cherries arid absolutely insurer the jaws retaining 
their position when yet. 

the No. 12 is intended to remove the 
atones with the least possible cutting or 
disfiguring of the Fruit. 



m No. 17, 
** No. 18, 



per dm. 
Japanned $9.00 

Tinned ~tdfi 10.00 



Wine & Jelly Press 




All the Leading Jobbery 

of the Dominion 

SELL THEM 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 
MAILED FREE 



The Enterprise Mfg. Co. of Pa. 

Philadelphia. Pa.. U. S. A. 




No. 34, $3.00 



No. 33, 

No. 34. 



Tinned ~®I $ 6.00 per doz 
Nickeled 15-00 " 






CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



The HUDSON PATTERN faWtf 

flPPIiE 
Pfl^EH 

Made by A. R. Woodyatt & Co. 

Is Guaranteed by them to be Satisfactory in Quality 

and the jobber with whom you place your order will do the same. 

THEY ARE MADE IN CANADA BY CANADIAN WORKMEN AND 
EQUAL ANY FOREIGN MAKE IN EVERY WAY, EXCEPT PRICE, 
OURS ARE LOWER ON THAT POINT ONLY. 




A. R. WOODYATT & CO., Guelph, Canada. 



Sold by all the 
wholesale trade. 



Kemp's Deluge Sprayers 



will give your 
?s _, f , a customers 

Wmk-^9 perfect satisfaction. 

They are well made. 
They will last. 
They will do the work. 

They are supplied with galvanized or copper reservoir, accord- 
ing to the size of your customer's purse. 
We will be pleased to tell you how little they cost. 

Kemp Manufacturing Company, Toronto. 





VOL. XIII. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, JULY 20, 1901. 



NO. 29. 



President, 

JOHN BAYNE MacLEAN, 

Montreal. 

THE MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO 

Limited. 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which cir- 
culate in the Provinces of British Columbia , 
North- Weet Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. 
Island and Newfoundland. 

OFFICES 

MONTREAL 132 McGill Street, 

Telephone 1155. 

TORONTO 10 Front Street East, 

Telephone 2148, 

LONDON, ENQ log Fleet Street, B.C.. 

W. H. Miln. 
MANCHESTER, ENQ. • - - 18 St Ann Street. 

H. S. Ashburner. 
WINNIPEG - - - - Western Canada Block, 

J. J. Roberts. 
ST. JOHN, N.B. ... No. 3 Market Wharf, 

1. Hunter White, 
NEW YORK. 176 E. 88th Street. 

Subscription, Canada and the United States, $2.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere - - - 12b. 

Published every Saturday. 

r>.v,i. ijj,... J Adscript, London. 
Cable Address j Adscripti Canada. 



• WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS 
PLEASE M ENTION THAT YOU SAW 
THEIR ADVERTISEMENT IN THIS PAPER 



TRAVELLERS' HOLIDAYS. 

BEGINNING with August 5th, and 
ending with the 17th of the same 
month, over 60 wholesale grocery, 
spice and woodenware houses in Ontario 
have decided to take their travellers off the 
road and give them a holiday. 

By doing this they have, we consider, set 
the wholesale hardware and metal houses 
an example that they might well follow. 

Just at that particular period of the year 
most of the travellers are off the road at any 
rate, and by a little understanding among 
the different houses it should be an easy 
• matter to have the holidays fall upon one 
uniform period. 

It is too late now for the wholesale hard- 
ware houses to do anything in the matter, 



but we draw their attention to it now 
so that they may be able to give it con- 
sideration before this time next year. 



FROM THE PAN TO THE INDUSTRIAL 

THE proximity of the Pan-American 
should be a help rather than a 
hinderance to the Industrial Exhi- 
bition at Toronto, provided intelligent 
methods are employed by the managers to 
make it so. Toronto and Buffalo are only 
about three hours' journey apart, and, if 
the attractions of the former are properly 
brought to the attention of those who visit 
the Pan-American at the latter city, many 
of them can, doubtless, be induced to 
extend their journey to the " Queen City." 
In fact, numbers of people who have been 
at the Pan-American are even now daily 
taking the journey across the lake to 
Toronto and other points in the Dominion. 
We are pleased to note that the manage- 
ment of the Industrial is making some effort 
in the direction indicated, for every visitor 
will spend money that will directly or indi- 
rectly accrue to the benefit of the business 
men of this country. 



Ideas are more likely to be caught than 
fish, provided one casts about diligently for 
them. 



GET UP STEAM. 

It does riot matter how much ability a 
man may have, the measure of- his success 
in business, or in any other vocation, will 
be in proportion to the energy he displays 
and the enterprise he develops. 

A man, like a locomotive, is of very little 
use until steam is up. 



AN INTERESTING CASE. 

THE question as to how far a firm or 
corporation can go in refusing to sell 
its wares to people who are able to 
pay for them has always been an interesting 
one. 

A year or two ago one of the courts of the 
United States, we forget at the moment 
which one, ruled that the proprietory 
medicine combination could not be com- 
pelled to supply with its products firms who 
refused to comply with their conditions as 
to sale. And now the South Carolina 
Supreme Court has rendered a decision in 
regard to a telephone case which seems to 
be based on a premise somewhat to the 
contrary. 

A Spartanburg merchant had in his store 
the 'phones of both The Bell Telephone 
Co. and The Citizens' Telephone Co. A 
fight being on between the two companies, 
the latter ordered the merchant to discon- 
tinue the use of the Bell telephone, and on 
his refusing to do so, removed its own 
instrument. 

The merchant thereupon applied for a 
mandamus to compel the Citizens' com- 
pany to restore its telephone, but the court 
before whom the application was made 
refused to grant the request. Nothing 
daunted, the merchant took the case before 
the Supreme Court of the State. And that 
court has just decided that a telephone com- 
pany cannot deny the use of its instruments 
to an applicant because he persists in using 
the lines of a rival company. 



A business man can get along without 
advertising just about as welt as a vessel 
without steam or sail. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



SIR RICHARD CARTWRIGHT AND THE HIGH 
COMMISSIONERSHIP. 



A CHICAGO paper says a movement 
is on foot to remove Lord Strath- 
cona from the High Commissioner- 
ship in London and appoint Sir Richard 
Cartwright in his room and stead. 

We hope it is only an idle rumor. As 
long as Lord Strathcona can be persuaded 
to retain the office it is to the interest of 
Canada that he should do so. He is easily 
the best High Commissioner Canada has 
had in London during the 18 years the 
office has been in existence. His person- 
ality, his business ability and his liberality 
have made him invaluable to Canada, and 
to replace him by one who has administered 
the chief business portfolio of the Govern- 
ment in such a perfunctory way would be a 
mistake most grave. 

Our criticism of the High Commissioner's 
office in the past has been because of the 
attempt to impose upon it as well the duties 
appertaining to a bureau of commercial 
intelligence for the use of business men in 
Canada who desire to find a market for 
their products in the United Kingdom. 
This it cannot do, at any rate, as it is at 
present constituted. The function of the 
High Commissioner's office is chiefly diplo- 
matic, not business. The latter is merely a 
sub line to it. 

What Canada wants, and what the busi- 
ness men of Canada demand, is a commer- 
cial agent who shall give his whole time to 
the duties of the office. He must be a 
Canadian of practical business experience, 
and one who is conversant with the resources 
and affairs generally of the Dominion. 
Such men are not relatively numerous, but 
there are enough of them to enable the 
Government to make a wise selection. 

Sir Richard Cartwright has been impor- 
tuned again and again by business men 
and by the press to make such an appoint- 
ment, but he has done nothing, nor has he 
evinced any intention of doing anything. 
In the meantime the interests of Canada 
are suffering, but the Minister of Trade and 
Commerce does not appear to be at all 
perturbed. 

We do not like to impute motives, but 
the High Commissionership would doubtless 
be an acceptable place of refuge to Sir 
Richard, and he is possibly hoping some 



day to occupy the office and administer a 
commercial agency as well. But whether 
we are correct or not in imputing such 
motives to the Minister of Trade and Com- 
merce we know full well that he has failed 
to comply with a demand that every busi- 
ness man and every newspaperman in 
the country knows to be in the interest of 
the Dominion. 

We believe that the portfolio for which 
Sir Richard is best fitted is that of Minister 
of Finance. There is probably no man in 
Canada to day in either of the two political 
parties who has the grasp of financial 
matters he has, but his cavalier treatment 
of business men has made him so unpopular 
with the commercial and manufacturing in- 
terests of this country that his appointment 
to the office would have raised a storm of 
indignation that would have been decidedly 
unpleasant to the leader of the Government. 

Since appointed to the portfolio of Trade 
and Commerce he has, by his inertia and 
by his noncompliance with their reasonable 
requests, further increased the displeasure 
of the commercial interests of the country 
toward him, and to send him to London as 
High Commissioner would only still further 
accentuate it. 



REPRESENTATIVES FOR THE 
MANUFACTURERS'. 



T 



•HERE are many manufacturers whose 
business does not warrant them keep- 
ing a traveller out on the road, but 
who, nevertheless, lose a great deal of trade 
which might be theirs were they represented 
at the right place. 

For instance, there are many articles 
which the trade will not keep in stock, 
because the demand is so limited that the 
small storekeeper cannot afford to carry 
them. True, he generally knows some 
leading house from which to get them if 
called for, but this sort of trade lacks the 
active sympathy which is required to sell 
goods in these days of keen competition. 

A remedy suggested, and one which does 
not seem unlikely, is for the manufacturer 
to secure the services of a local member in 
his particular line of trade, in every city, 
town and village in the country to act as 
agent for him and push the sale of his 
articles whenever possible. 



To do this he might advertise through the 
trade press offering liberal commissions to 
agents for business so obtained, thus reach- 
ing and keeping constantly in touch with 
the storekeeper in every part of the country. 

The remedy is a simple one, and might 
easily be put into operation and given a fair 
trial. 

HOT-WEATHER SELLERS. 

SULTRY days such as have been so 
frequent during the last fortnight 
uniformly bring in their train an 4 
exceptional demand for certain lines, which 
should, therefore, be conspicuously dis- 
played just now. 

The great number leaving for lakeside or 
river cause a big demand for campers' 
supplies, such as fishing tackle, hammocks, 
tents, flags, awnings, etc. A good many 
hardwaremen are meeting this demand by 
displaying these goods, particularly fishing 
tackle, prominently. 

Housekeepers who, for one reason or 
another, stay at home in town or city also 
have particular "wants" during the hot 
days. Screen doors and windows, garden 
hose, water-coolers, refrigerators and ice 
cream freezers may not be a necessity, but 
they are exceedingly valuable articles to 
have these days, and their cost is more 
than compensated for by their practical 
value. They are worth pushing. 

Many people have not bought these 
goods because they do not realize their 
practical value. Therefore, in pushing 
them, efforts should be directed to convince 
the women -folk that they are worth having; 
that they are part of the essentials of first- 
class housekeeping. They can do this by 
judicious advertising and tasty window 
displays. 

THE PRICE OF STOVES. 

OVER 40 of the largest stove manu- 
facturers west of the Alleghany 
Mountains, representing the West- 
ern Association, decided at a meeting held 
in Chicago a few days ago to continue 
present prices for another three months. 

In Canada, since the beginning of the 
year, there has been some readjustment in 
the price of stoves, the net result of which is 
a slightly lower range of quotations in the 
cheaper descriptions. These reductions are 
not due to any decrease in the cost of raw 
material ; they are the result of a desire to 
put prices on a more equitable basis. 

The travellers representing the different 
manufacturers are on the road busy taking 
orders for stoves and furnaces for future 
delivery, and quite a good many have been 
booked. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



9 



THE MANUFACTURE OF CEMENT IN CANADA. 

T11K fact that a Western Ontario cement Those who have been connected with the 

company last year paid 8131,000 Canadian cement industry fear that there 

dividend cm its $200,000 stuck has " lay b f il ""epilation '» the country nexl 

, i i .i ,-i ■ ,, i ,• yeai' of that, overproduction which occurred 

engendered the idea in the minds oi many . . , 

in the United States during' the past tew 

people that a cement manufacturing plant nt i i „i ,,.,,. f n- 

' ° ' moiitiis. .bast year cement was selling on 

is a veritable gold mine ; and now we see a the New York market at #2.35 lo $2.50 pel 

mushroom growth of our cement manul'ac- barrel ; this year it is quoted just !5I lower. 

Inline industry. ' ' 1,> cause u ' the depression was simply a 

, , .. too rapid multiplication of factories. Canada 

Last summer there were only ti\e plants , . ,, . . . . . 

has teit tins war ot prices quite keenly, for 

* " °P«-ation '" Conach ; nexl season there (arge quantifcies oi American cement have 

will be at leasl eleven; and there are come into this country appreciably shutting 

rumors of more. We ardently hope that ull(j t' 1 '-' h'-' 1 grade of German cement and 

each and every venture will be successful, j n *ffering with sales of our domestic stuff. 

, . . ,. 'I his has forced prices down in all parts of 

hut. we liar that there are manj circum- , 

the country, 
stances surrounding their position that will 

tend to make their market a difficult one' J - :lsl • V( ' !lr German or Canadian eemenl 

to operate upon. Prices have taken a big sold '" Montreal at $2.40 to $2.50 per 

tumble this spring owing to exterior pres- barrel; now it can be bought at $2 to 

What will happen this fall and next. $ 2 - 10 ' '" Toronto, Hamilton and western 

-pring. when an important interior force is Points, cement which was last year worth 

added, is only to be a matt,.,- of surmise $ 2 - 60 <" *' J(i5 ' can '"' had from fche Bame 

but it must nnt furnish pleasant cogitation P lants for *l-90— a decline of 70 to 75c. per 

for our novice manufacturers. barrel. 

Las! year there were onlj the works of The decline '" both quarters has been 

The Owen Snmid Portland Cement Com- caused by American competition. Manufac- 

pany, The St. Lawrence Portland Cement turefi : "-' r " ss (l "' line bave '"■'■ |l shipping 

Company, the two manufactories of The ll "' '''•""'»» in bags, which are returned, 

Canadian Portland Cemen. Company, and s;ui "- ""' '■"-< '" ,llr barrel ils well as the 

that of Thos. M. Morgan, in Montreal, in freight and the duty on it, all of which is 

operation. This year's quota to the aggre- sai<l '" : """""< '" 26c. per barrel. More- 

gation are: The imperial Portland Cement over > '" s P ite of fche Proximity oi our in.- 

Company, of Owen Sound; The Grey & tories ( " consumption points, the freight 

Bruce Portland Cement Company, 'of Owen rates are not much in their favor. Cement 

Sound; The Lakefield Portland Cement ,a " '"' sh ' from fchc Lehi S h VillU '. v fco 

Company, of Lakefield. Out.; The Sun Toronto at a rate of lie. per 100 lb., while 

Portland Cemenl Company, of Owen Sound, from Owen Sound the rate is 8 I -2c. The 

ll, Northern Portland Cement, Company, rate from Glens Falls, N.Y., to Montreal is 

of Wiarton, Out,; and The National Port- 8 1 " 2c - P er l0 ° "'■• which is comparatively 

land Cemenl Company, of Durham. Out. lower - S " ""' Cariadian manufacturer is 

It is said that -it is contemplated to estab "" , Protected by much more than the tariff 

lish a facton in Manitoba next vear. but ol l2 1 " 2c - P fir l0 ° lb - which is calculated 

for the truth of the report we cannot to be scarcely enough to counterbalance the 

vouch. Omitting .his and the Durham con difference in the price of fuel and labor 

cern, * apacitj we have not been able expenses enjoyed b.v the American manufac- 

to determine the total output in Canada fcurer - We do hear, however, that such 

next vear will be in the neighborh I of works ^ ih:lt •'* Lakefield are to be ope, 

l.jnii barrel a day. This will be a large atr ' 1 h - v ( ' l,rin,; P ower > generated by water 

production, and ,t is questionable whether P ower ' This lls *' of e,ectric motors ou £ ht 

the increase is justifiable. t0 l"' nm( ."' - n ' al simplicity in the con- 

Capacity struct ion ol works, oi compactness, and of 

in labor-saving devices. Where advantages 

arre s. BUC }] -, s these are possessed, our domestic 

Owen Sound Portland Cement Co <;oo , , , , , , .... 

_ makers oii'_iht to be able to successfully 

Canadian I.ooo 

c, i o ., .. compete with an> outsider. 

at. Lawrence 300 ' 

Thos. M. Morgan . 100 Crtain it is that the lower cost ol 

Imperial 300 cement should brinu about an increased con- 
Grey and Bruce " " 300 sumption and a more general substitution 

Lakefield " 600 , .. ... ., , . 

_ lor mortar. I'.ven with the increased 1111- 

bun 600 - 

M„,.t,„,„ i< ■■ •• portations, The Kathbun Company sav that 

Northern 500 ' ' 

the product of one of their works is sold 

_ 4,200 ahead for the season. 

Of the new works. The Imperial, and The 

Grey and Bruce are commencing' operations 

this' month, while The Northern will not be The hotter the weather, the less "steam" 

offering any goods till next spring. it is possible for a man to develop. 



THE SHEET WORKERS' STRIKE 
AND PRICES. 

NOT iof a long time has there been a 
strike which promised to concern 
hardwareineu more than that now 
on among the iron, steel and tinworkers of 
the United States. The eon, ems affected 
are The American Tinplate Co., The Amer 

ican Sheet Steel Co., ami The American 

Steel Hoop Co.. while the number of men 
011 si rike is nearly 74,000. 

The strike being in its first Stages it is 
too early to say what its ultimate effeel 
on prices will be. Should it be a pro- 
tracted struggle it will certainly have a 
marked influence on a number of lines. In 
tact, already there are indications of this. 

The lines most likely to be affected are 
tinplates, black sheets, and galvanized 

sheets. 

The tinplate industry in Greal Britain is 

almost certain to be benefited by (he strike, 
and already the market there is somewhat 

disturbed by the inquiries that have come 
from the United States for quick ship- 
ments. Some authorities predict that 
if the strike continue. it will lie neces- 
sary to import tinplates in order to satisfy 
the demand from the packers of canned 
goods. 

I'.ven in Canada there is a little more 
disposition to anticipate requirements for 
tinplate, and quotations on charcoal and 
coke plates are from 25 to 50c. per box 
higher. 

The underlying principle of the strike is 
an attempt to establish the supremacy of 
the union, or strictly speaking, the suprem- 
acy of The Amalgamated Association of 
Iron. Steel and Tin Workers. It appears 
that there are two of the mills of The 
Sheet Steel Company which have hitherto 
not being treated as union mills, and the 
final cause of the strike was the refusal of 
the companies to make these mills a. sub- 
ject for consideration at the conference 
between the interests concerned. 

The companies offered to sign the amal- 
gamated scale for all plants and to make 
1 he wages uniform for the various kinds of 
work in all the mills operated, but declined 
to recognize the plants that had been 
operated for years as non-union. This pro 1 
position the representatives of the union, 
as already intimated, refused to entertain, 
demanding that the companies must sign 
for union and mm union men alike. 

The companies claim they are quite will- 
ing' to recognize the" right of their employes 
lo organize, but having men ill their employ 
who do not belong to The Amalgamated 
Association and do not wish lo belong to it. 
they held it was onlv fair they should 

respect their wishes. 

It has always seemed to us right and 
proper that employes should organize; bul 
we could never see the justice of their not 
only trying to fore.' into their organiza- 
tions men who did not favor them, but of 
endeavoring to force the employes to help 
them. 



10 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



>»•♦•+»< 



THE ART OF WINDOW DRESSING. 



■ ♦♦«»«' 



HARDWARE STORE WINDOW DISPLAY. 

TO conduct his business to success the 
hardwareman must, first, buy what 
the public wants ; second, let the 
public know that he has what it wants ; 
third, sell at an advance, and. everlastingly, 
keep at it. 

Each stej) is equally important, but the 
second point is seldom studied as closely as 
the first and third. The average dealer will 
ransack heaven and earth to find the best 
place to buy, and he knows at just what 
figure he should sell a given article to get 

a fair profit. These points are mor 

less mathematical. But when it comes to 
actual selling— ah ! there's the rub. It is 
at this point that ability tells and arith- 
metic is in vain. 

LET THE PUBLIC KNOW. 

The first step to this end is to let the 
public know that you have what it wants. 
It is with this phase of the campaign that 
this paper deals. You can arrive at the 
desired result in two ways — either by tell- 
ing them by personal speech, letter, news 
paper advertisement, floater, fence signs, 
"'satisfied customer," etc., or by showing 
them. 

Say one person a minute passes your store 
14 hours a day. This means that 5,000 
pass every week. If two, or four or eight 
or more persons pass your store every min- 
ute the number per week is astonishing. 
To be sure, the same persons are apt to 
pass again and again. None the worse. 
Pour enough water on a cloth and. unless 
it is strictly waterproof, the water will 
trickle through in time. 

If the hardwareman can so display his 
window as to attract the attention of a 
majority of this throng of passers-by. and 
by his display remind them that he has 
something they want, or may want, and 
connect his name with the reminder, he 
will have some exceedingly good seed. Tt 
has been my experience that otherwise up- 
to-date merchants pay too little attention 
to their window in comparison with other 
advertising, and 1 will attempt to show in 
as few words as possible that window adver- 
tising is worth while. 

EMPHASIZE THE FIRM NAME. 

First and foremost, identify the firm name 
with the window display. Your name is 
above the door, to be sure, but folks look- 
ing at the window as they pass cannot look 
over the door at the same time. Have your 
name in a prominent place in the display, 
so that Mrs. Smith will not say " I saw a 
handsome library stove in a window on 
Washington street to-day," but " I saw a 
handsome library stove in Thompson's win- 
dow to-day." 

Before taking up concrete examples of 
window dressing there is another essential 
point to be considered — viz., what should 
he displayed in a window. There is a pre- 
vailing notion abroad that it is a waste of 
time and energy to 

DISPLAY STAPLES. 
Merchants arc apt to argue "everybody 
knows that a hardwareman keeps those 
things. What is the use of putting them 
in the window ? " The answer is this : 
A good many kitchen ranges and washtubs 
and hammers and hatchets and dust pans in 



genera] use are worn out, or nearly so, and 
if, as our friend Mrs. Smith passes your 
store the next time, she says to herself, 
" Urn ! I'll soon need another washtub. 
I wonder how much that one costs in 
Thompson's window ? " the display has not 
been made in vain. Another word : Don't 
trim your window exclusively for the bene- 
fit of the small boy. A crowd around the 
window is all i-i <_; ( 1 1 . as far as it goes. It 
attracts attention. When a window con- 
tains anything spectacular, have the line to 
which you wish to call the public's atten- 
t ion high enough to be seen by the passers- 
h\ over the gazers' heads. 

THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE 
WINDOW. 

In regard to the construction of the win- 
dow, have a flat bottom painted black. 
Fitting over this have a false bottom of 
loose boards covered with black cloth. Take 
out all the lithograph advertisements of 
threshing machines and fertilizers hanging 
on the sides. These only tend to distract 
attention from the window display proper. 
When you wish to advertise fertilizers in 
your window make a display. It is impos- 
sible to advertise two unconnected lines in 
one window and do it well. Have the sides 
and ceiling of the window painted black. 
At the back of the window, halt way up, 
have a brass rod and on this string a cloth 
of some quiet material that will not show- 
dirt. The brass rod should be so 
arranged that it will bend out of its sock- 
ets. 

All windows should be cleaned twice a 
week from the outside with dipper, pail 
and brush. The inside should be cleaned 
once a week with a chamois. 
SUGGESTED SPUING AND SUMMER 
DISPLAYS. 

Below are given some displays that are 
suggested for spring and summer : 

I. Flower Seeds and Garden Tools.— Put 
a two-storey row of empty nail kegs at the 
back of the window. On the top of these 
arrange a row of plants. Hire them from 
the greenhouse or send the boy to vour 

house for them with a wl Ibarrow. Before 

you send the boy explain to your wife what 
he is coming for. She will probably object 
at first, but perseverance means success. 
Slant loose boards from the top of the nail 
kegs to the front of the window. Cover the 
boards with green crepon paper. Decorate 
the flower pots with red crepon paper. 
Arrange papers of garden seeds in some 
artistic pattern all over the green board. 
leaving a blank aisle down the centre of the 
incline. In this centre aisle display trow- 
els and other small garden tools. Have the 
seeds arranged quite solidly, but allow 
plenty of green paper to show between the 
tools. On the sides of the window hang 
spades, hoes and rakes. Have your name 
lettered neatly on a long card somewhere up 
among the flowers. 

II. Washday Art icles.— Put your hand- 
somest kitchen stove in the window. Open 
the front door of the stove, put red tissue 
paper behind the grate and string an incan- 
descent light inside. If this cannot be 
done put in a lighted candle. At this 
point the stove will alow in a manner most 
naturally. Put a wash boiler on top of the 
two front rounds and a couple of sad irons 
on the back. Have stovepipe connected to 
the stove and elbowed up behind the top 



of the window. Place two washtubs on a 
washbench and distribute two or three buck- 
ets around. Put a washboard in the tubs. 
Lean a clothes horse against the side of the 
window. If you keep a store cat put him 
in the window to lie under the stove. It 
will add to the attractiveness of the dis- 
play. Show the name in a prominent 
place. 

III. Lawn Material.— Get enough grass 
rugs to cover the bottom of the window. 
Your photographer will lend them to you. 
If you have no photographer coyer the floor 
of the window with green crepon paper. 
Then get some loose cut grass and scatter 
well around. Place a lawn mower at one 
end of the window and a reel of garden hose 
at the other. Have one end of the hose^ 
attached to a sprinkler. Place a wooden 
rake in the centre near a heap of grass and 
lean a scythe against the side of the win- 
dow. Also have a pair of grass shears and 
a sickle on the scene, and a bag of crass 
seed it the season is timely. Your name, 
as usual, should be in a prominent place. 

IV. Dogs Days' Material.— Cover the floor 
of the window with green crepon paper. 
Decorate an empty nail keg with red paper 
and place in central position. Place a large 
sized freezer on the keg. Place a semicircle 
of small freezers liack of the central figure. 
Hang a number of window screens on the 
side of the window • Fill in the background 
with screen doors. Hang a thermometer in 
1 1 out of the nail keg and put an open bag 
of rock salt where it will easily be seen. 

V. Saws, Axes, Etc.— Put a saw buck in 
the window and a good-sized log on it. Have 
two or three pieces sawed off and lying by 
the side as if they had fallen there. Also 
get a heap of sawdust from a carpenter shop 
and place under the buck in the proper 
place. Put a framed wood saw on the log 
or leaning against the buck. At the other 
end of the window have a chopping block 
surrounded by a lot of chips. Place an 
axe by the side of the block. Put a piece 
of wood, like sample in saw buck, on the 
chopping block and stick a hatchet in it. 
By the side of the window lean a number 
of wood saws and axes. Name as usual. 

POINTS OF ARRANGEMENT AND 
DISPLAY. 
The above illustrations are enough to 
show the essential points of their particu- 
lar system of window display. Have one 
prevailing idea to show. Then show it. 
Do not cloud it with a lot of irreconcil- 
ables. Have the window arranged intel- 
ligently with articles that may suggest 
to the passers-by that they are the very 
things they need or will need. 
Remember that a quiet strain of humor is 
never out of place except at a funeral or 
when trying to collect an overdue ac- 
count. 
Have your yame identified with the articles 

shown. 
As to " smart " signs in windows. If you 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 



WIRE 



Prompt Shipment! 

_ V 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited 
HAMILTON, ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



11 



can yet people to look in .your window 

without the aid of a catchy sign so much 

the better. The public is more apt to 

remember the catchiness than your name. 

The only sign in your window should be 

the one bearing your name. 
A little experimenting will bring about 

clearness on all obscure points. 
Have each clerk try his hand at window 

arrangement in succession. 
.Saturday morning is the best time to trim 

a window. 
A display should never, except under excep 

tional circumstances, stand more than a 

week. 
When a particularly good display is shown 
iy prepare a news item about it and take it 

to the local papers where you advertise. 

They will be glad to print it. 

PRICING GOODS IN WINDOWS. 

As a general rule price tags should not lie 
attached to goods. It is more apt to lead 
to useless competition than to business. 
Robinson asks a customer $4.50 for a lawn 
mower. " Oh, oh ! " says the customer. 
" Thompson has one in his window just like 
that tor $3.5Q." It is useless for Robin- 
son to try to explain that his §4.50 machine 
is a better one than Thompson's $3.50 
mower, tie may even show the customer 
one for $3. " Oh, oh ! " says the customer 
to himself. " Just to think that Robinson 
here would have charged me $4.50 if I had 
not seen thai one iii Thompson's window." 
Of course, the customer is wrong, absolute- 
ly wrong. But he has made up his mind 
that Robinson's SI. 50 and Thompson's 
$3.50 machines look a lot alike, and my 
man will leave Robinson without making 
a purchase. Robinson gets mad. He puts 
a $3 mower in his window, marked $3. 
Thompson hears of this, gets his blood up, 
and puts a similar mower in his window 
marked §2.75. Finally the price of the 
s.3 machine comes down to $1.98, perhaps 
$1.48. There is also the possibility of 
$l. - 23, but this I prefer not to contemplate. 
Nothing has been gained and the trade has 
been hurt. Local dealers should come to 
some understanding about this price mark 
question, and the agreement should be that, 
as a general rule, price tags are not to be 
attached to goods displayed. 
PREVENTING IN JURY. TO GOODS IN 
. WINDOW. 

Each merchant must decide for himself as 
lo the advisability of displaying goods easily 
shop worn. It comes down to a cold ques- 
tion whether the damage is adequate to the 
return. In the summer a wire screen can 
be aria need at the back of the windows to 
keep out the flies. This should come down 
as far as the brass rod and be tacked to a 
light wooden frame. The curtain will serve 
the purpose below the rod, and the wire 
screen must be so arranged that the brass 
rod can easily be bent out of its sockets. 
There will then be no trouble in moving 
small things, and pretty large ones, too, 
out of the window. The frame of the wire 
screen should be likely tacked or screwed 
to the window casing, so that it can be 
removed in a minute when necessary. Some 
hardwaremen use cloth mosquito netting, 
but this is inferior to wire netting. The 
best plan of all is to put fly proof articles 
in the window during fly time and dispense 
with screens entirely. It will be noted 
that none of the articles mentioned in the 
above examples can be damaged to any 
great extent by flies. 
^ PRIZE WINDOW COMPETITION YOR 
CUSTOMERS. 

Invite the general public to submit 
schemes for dressing your window. Name 
the articles you wish displayed. Offer three 
prizes for the best suggestions. These 





is best defined as "the sum total of the cost of the material 
and its application, divided by the number of times you have 
to repaint in a given term of years." 
Figured in this manner 

The Sherwin-Williams Paint 

can always show the greatest economy. 

It is not made for low cost by the gallon, but for low 
cost by the job. It is made to give the greatest possible 
durability, the greatest covering capacity and, therefore, the 
greatest economy. 

There's no other paint you can sell that will bring your 
trade to see so clearly that "the best is cheapest." 

Profit and reputation are in S-W. P. — in it for you, if you 
take hold with us and use our methods of building business. 






The Sherwin-Williams Co. 



CHICAGO, 
NEW YORK, 



PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 

CLEVELAND. 
NEWARK, BOSTON, SAN FRANCISCO. 

MONTREAL, T0R0NI0, KANSAS CITY 



prizes can take the form of cash, merchan- 
dise or reflate on purchases. Advertise t his 
ofter bv putting a large sign in y;ur win- 
dow. Have the sign as large as the win- 
dow will permit. Send a neatly typewrit 
ten mimeograph letter to your customers 
and prospective customers. Advertise the 
scheme generously in your local papers. 
Have reading notices in these same papers. 
Create interest in the contest. This can 
easily be done if the prizes are worth while. 
The prizes should be worth while, and it 
is as good an advertising investment as you 
can make. Have the three winning dis- 
plays in your window in succession, each 
standing a week. Put a small card some- 
where in each of these displays stating the 
winner's name. Also have a reading: notice 
in your newspapers to the same effect. Thus 
at one stroke you will have received a won- 
derful lot of good, healthy, first-rate adver- 
tisine, and will have taught the public to 
look in your window as it passes by. Tin' 
above outlined plan applies more particu- 
larly to the small towns, although a modi 
fication of the above can easily be worked 
out for the larger cities.— G. T. Weston, in 
Iron Age. 

SUBTERRANEAN TELEPHONE 
SYSTEM. 

The success that has attende'd the laying 
of the subterranean telegraph cable between 
London and Birmingham, a distance of 113 
miles, has prompted the postal authorities 
to utilize the cable for telephoning. This is 
considered to mark the limit of underground 
telephoning with the existing apparatus. 
Several of the leading other Provincial 
towns, such as Liverpool, have petitioned 
the postal authorities to connect their cities 



with London b\ a direct subterranean cable, 
such as that running to Birmingham, but 
their requests have been refused until a 
method of transmitting underground tele 
phonic messages over long distances is 
toiind The British post cfiioe i. gradually 
providing a reliable telephone system 
throughout the whole of the United King- 
dom by the aid of the telegraph wires. For 
(his purpose $10,000,000 has been authorized 
by Parliament, a large portion of which 
sum, however, is being expended upon the 
London telephone system, which it is 
expected will be partly in operation in tin; 
autumn of this year. The competition 
between the Government and municipal tele- 
phone systems on the one side, and The 
National Telephone Company, which has 
hitherto enjoyed a monopoly, on the other 
side, is very keen. One town in the south 
of England, the first to possess a municipal 
telephone has been the means of reducing 
the charge of the private company from $50 
to $20 per annum.— Scientific American. 



A NEW LAMP. 

The Ontario Lantern Co., of Hamilton, 
have just made a shipment of incandescent 
pressure lamps, which they are manufactur- 
ing for The Emerson Incandescent Oil Light 
Co., of Ottawa, who own and control the 
patent for the same. This is an all metal 
portable table lamp, unique in design and 
finish, and light in weight. 

Mr. V. L. Emerson, the patentee, claims 
that this lamp will produce from 150 to 200 
candle power at a cost of less than ic. per 
hour, and is warranted not to emit any odor, 
and to be perfectly safe. 



12 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



PAINT MEN PICNIC. 

WEDNESDAY, July 10, was a red 
letter day for the employes of The 
Sherwin Williams Co.. Montreal. 
At 9 o'clock in the morning about 250 
people, including the employes, their 
families and friends, started ont for Bout de 
L'Isle, on the special cars engaged by this 
company for the occasion of their annual 
picnic. 

There had been a slight rainfall early in 
the morning, but it soon cleared up, and 
the weather for the rest of the day was per- 
fect. On arrival at the grounds, a pro- 
gramme of races and games was carried out 
in a business-like fashion, the winners of 
the various events being as follows : 

100 yards 1 dash— 1, C. S. Bann ; 2, J. Hillard ; 3, 
R. H. McMaster. 

50 yards' dash (ladies)— 1, E. Agnew ; 2. G. 
Whitehead ; 3, E. Whitehead. 

Hop, step and jump— 1, J. Ellard ; 2, E.Ray- 
mond ; 3, B. McGerrigle. 

Sorting boots— 1, S. Grey ; 2, G. E. Radford ; 3, 
W. Hutchings. 

Obstacle race— 1, C. S. Bann ; 2, S. Gray ; 3, J. 
Quinn. 

Egg race (ladies)— 1, K. Clements ; 2, M. Smith; 
3, E. Whitehead. 

Tug-of-war— Won by J. Clements' team. 

Baseball game (factory vs. office) — Won by 
factory. 

In the afternoon, appropriately brief 
speeches were made by the manager, 
superintendent and visiting representatives 
from the Cleveland and Chicago houses, 
who also expressed their pleasure at being 
present, after which the prizes were dis- 
tributed, and the rest of the day was 
pleasantly spent in dancing and engaging 
in the various amusements with which the 
park is provided. 

The cars, which returned in the evening, 
carried a tired, sunburned, but extremely 
enthusiastic crowd, back to the city. Any 
one passing within earshot on Wednesday 
evening would have heard something like 
this : 

In Cleveland city is made a paint well known to 

widest fame. 
All others try to imitate, but none are just the 

same ; 
It spreads and covers and shines and lasts, the best 

on land or sea, 
So come and join the chorus, boys, and shout the 

words with me. 
Chorus : 
For O ! for O ! the whole world must agree 
There is only one paint that will cover the earth, 

and that's S.-W.P. 

The event was unanimously pronounced 
to be the most successful picnic which this 
company has ever held. 



SMALLER PIG IRON OUTPUT. 

LAST week's issue of The Iron Age con- 
tains the usual monthly summary of 
capacity of pig iron furnaces in part 
as follows : 

"So far as existing plant is concerned, 
our capacity for the production of pig iron 
is now pretty close to the maximum. A few 
new furnaces will still come in during the next 



few months, notably Neville Island, which 
started since the beginning of the month ; a 
new South Chicago ; a new Sharon ; a new 
Pioneer, in Alabama ; Port Oram, in New 
Jersey ; Warwick, in the Schuylkill Valley, 
and Colorado, in the West. But the old 
plants are pretty well strained to the utmost, 
and we may at times witness a good deal ot 
blowing out for repairs. Stocks have again 
shown some decrease. 

"The weekly capacity of the fnrnaces in 
blast on July 1 compares as follows with 
that of the preceding periods : 

Capacity 
Fiirna es Per Week, 
in Bla»t Gtosb Tons. 

July l,19:i 2*9 31»,95) 

Junel 254 3.-4.5J5 

Mayl 550 ?0i.l 5 

April 1 250 195.676 

Miroh 1 H8 25-2,99 

February 1 245 2782)8 

January i 133 i5",35l 

December 1, 190J 211 218,815 

November 1 2il 21531 

October 1 2H 223, '9 

•Saptemberl 228 231,778 

August 1 241 2'4,4 6 

Ju'y 1 »84 283;413 

FURNACE STOCKS. 

"The position of furnace stocks, soldand 
unsold, as reported to us, was as below on 



July i, the same furnaces being represented 
as in former months. This does not in- 
clude the holdings of the steel works pro- 
ducing their own iron : 

Stocks. March 1. June 1. July 1. 

Anthracite anl coke 455,8(0 333,813 327,761 

Ch rcjal 80,603 73,910 64,837 

Totals 536,443 407,723 392,598 



STATISTICAL POSITION OF BRITISH 
BLAST FURNACES. 

The returns of the furnaces in blast in 
the United Kingdom at the end of the half- 
year are given in our supplement with the 
current issue of The Iron and Coal Trades 
Review. It will be noted that there were, 
at the end of June, 330 furnaces in blast, 
which is an increase of 13 compared with 
the number in blast at the end of the pre- 
vious quarter, but is yet a decrease of 73 
furnaces compared with the number blowing 
at the end of the year 1899. The total 
number of furnaces being rebuilt or relined 
at the end of June was 58, which number 
would be equal to an addition of 1,300,000 
tons per year to the British output of pig 
iron, at the yearly average of 1900. — Iron 
and Coal Trades Review. 



DISTINGUISHING FEATURES 



that mark the difference between the best 
Single Gun and others: 



tr 



Semi-Hemmerless. 
Trigger Action (neither side nor top snap). 
Automatic Ejector or Non-Ejector (at option of user). 
Flush Head Locking ^©lt (positive and simple). 
Absolutely safe (accidental discharge impossible). 
• Metal Tipped Fore End. 

Features that are found only in the 



IVER JOHNSON 



The World's Single Gun Standard of Excellence. 




Iver Johnson's Arms & Cycle Works, 



Branches— New York- 99 Chambers St. 
Boston— 165 Washington St. 
Worcester— 364 Main St. 



FITCHBURG, Mass. 




E, B. SALYERDS 

Manufacturer of 

Hockey Sticks 



PRESTON, 



Ontario, 



Canada. 



The Best Stick. t 

Made of Rock Elm. 
Wholesale Trade Only Supplied. 
Ask your Wholesale House for 
the Preston make of Stick. 
Write for Prices. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



13 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS 

37-39 Front Street West, Toronto. 

HARVEST ifO0LS. 



WHOLESALE 



&C0. 



ONLY 
WHOLESALE 





J* 

y r^ fy Cradle Fingers. 




FRENCH MULAY, Wood Brace Complete 
" Iron " 

Wood Hay Rakes. 




HALF MULAY, Wood Brace Complete 
Iron " 




TURKEY WING, Wood Brace Complete 



Wood Bows, Straight Handles. Iron Bows, Straight Handles. 

Bent " Bent 





Steel Barley Forks, with and without Guard. 



Hay Forks. Wood Barley Forks, with Guard. 

■* H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., Toronto 

Graham Wire and Cat Nails are the Best, 

Factory: Dufferin Street, Toronto. 



WE SHIP 

PROMPTLY 



OUR PRICES 

ARE RIGHT 



14 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



TRADE IN COUNTRIES OTHER THAN OUR OWN. 



ORDERS for wire nails are less fre- 
quent and smaller quantities are 
being railed for. Outside mills 
are now offering nails at slight concessions 
in price, which causes a feeling on the part, 
of many in the trade that the market price 
mav be affected thereby before long. The 
conservative trade are avoiding the accumu- 
lation of stocks in anticipation of a possible 
decline in prices. —Iron Age. 

PIG IRON IN GREAT BRITAIN. 

Iron and dial Trades Review, duly 5: — 

The genera] condition of the pig iron mar- 
kets is rathci- nioie satisfactory than last 
week. In the Cleveland district business 
i- looking up again, and prices are firmer. 
The recent drop seems to have been brought 
about largely b\ speculative operations, and 
while the market was perceptibly weaken- 
ing, ordinary consumers naturally held off, 
waiting to place their orders at the time 
most favorable to themselves. The up- 
ward turn in quotations has brought many 
of these into the market, and more activity 
has resulted, makers having placed some 
verj satisfactory orders on their books this 
week. No. 3 has been raised by some 

makers to 15s., and -lis. 3d. appears to 
have been the minimum accepted, whereas 
last week lis. w&s taken. Warrants, too, 
have gone up slightly since our last. In 
the other districts there has not been much 
change. There being no recent drop to 

recover, there has been no rise. More 
inquiries are reported, and makers are in 
the main steadily adhering to their quota 
lions, despite opportunities offering of book- 
ing large orders at concessions, and in many 
cases are eharj of entering into future 
engagements of any importance on present 
terms. The following is a statement of 
( he public stocks : — 



Tons 

59,(i(>(> 
9 
,. 8 



)7 8(1.) \ 
8,80(1/ 



Connal's at Glasgow 

Connal's at Middlesbrough . 
Railway Stores, Middlesbro'.. 
Connal's at Middlesbroi gh, 

hematite 4,800 

Cumberland & Barrow Stores.. 22.C00 



Change during 1901. 

increase decrease 

Tons Tons 

11,60(1 



48,500 



HARDWARE TRADE IN THE UNITED STATES. 

At this season many influences tend to 
reduce the volume of business. Travellers 
are nearly all at home and there is thus a 
cessation in the active pursuit of orders. 
Principals and employes are enjoying or 
looking forward to vacations. With the 

lesse I demand for goods there is with 

both manufacturing and mercantile estab- 
lishments more or less attention given to 
the review of the course of things during 
the' half year just passed and the closing up 
of its business. Preparations are also mak- 
ing for the prosecution of trade in the open- 
ing season. This calls for new plans and 
enterprises, the consideration of which re- 
ceives a good share of the attention of pro- 
gressive manufacturers and merchants. Pae- 
lories arc also being shut down and over- 
hauled and in some cases enlarged to meet 
the demands of the trade with increased 
facilities. The condition of the market, 
too, encourages a waiting policy, so that 
while there is a good deal of buying going 
on. it is not, as a rule, in especially large 
quantities. While these influences operate 
againsl a heavj volume of business, it is 
gratifying to note that there continues to 



be a good demand, and the general situa- 
tion is eminently satisfactory. The promise 
of the crops is on the whole excellent, and 
there thus appears to be a basis for general 
prosperity. 
^MtNotwi t list and ing setbacks in certain direc- 
rtojis and in certain lines of goods, it is 
e\ ident, that the general export business of 
the pouhtiy is larger than ever before, and 
that in this tyade hardware and metal pro- 
ducts are holdflhtfan important place. Indus- 
trial and manufacturing enterprises continue 
to be actively prosecVrfediand there is more 
building than for several yegrs. The state 
of the market is such thai .the trade in 
most lines feel safe in placing '"orders for 
their requirements for the near future, but 
there is practically no disposition to(jrpec% 
late and a conservative policv is generadj^y 
regarded as prudent. — Iron Age. 

' J . 

THE TINPLATE TRADE. 

The market has been very quiet during 
the past week buyers having filled their 
requirements for some little time, evidently 
preferring to hold off as much as possible 
in anticipation of lower figures. Makers, 
however, are very firm in their quotations, 
and as they all seem to be pretty well 
booked ahead, plates for near delivery com 
inand a premium, so much so that 14s. per 
box f.o.b. Liverpool was paid the other day 
for a parcel of IC 14x20 112 sheets, ins 
lb. Bessemer cokes, delivery this month. 
For forward delivery makers' quotations 
varv very much. There are sellers, of IC 
I I \ 20 Bessemer cokes at Pis. 1 l-2d. per 
box f.o.b. Wales, while some works are ask- 
ing 13s. 4 l-2d. and 13s. 6d. 13s. 1 l-2d. is 
about their present value, however, and 
transactions have taken place at this, with 
lights at the usual reduction. 

There has been a good deal of inquiry for 
28 x 20's, both in 112 and 56 sheets,' but 
little actual business has taken place. Com- 
mon 112 sheets 21(> lb. Bessemer cokes were 
sold this week at 2(is. !)d., and some 56 
sheets 108 Jb. at 13s. 7 l-2d. and 13s, 9d. 
per box ( both f.o.b. Wales), but the quanti- 
ties were not large. 

The Continental inquiry has been very 
good, but present quotations seemingly do 
not meet with buyers' views, as there is 
only a small business reported on the week. 
One or two lines have been booked for 
August-September delivery, at from 13s. 4 
l-2d. to J 3s. 9d. basis, and a few rather 
good sizes for October were done at 13s. 
4 l-2d. in Bessemer steel, Siemens cokes 
commanding from 1 l-2d. to 3d. more 
money. 

The home trade is brisk, and wasters of 
all descriptions command a steady sale, 14 
x 20 full weights having been sold during 
the week at 12s. 7 l-2d. and 12s. 9d. per 
box f.o.b. Wales; 14 x IS 3-4 and 20x10 
are also in good request, and sales have 
taken place at 12s. 6d. to 12s. 7 l-2d., and 
Mis. 6d. to 16s. 9d. per box respectively. — 
Iron and Coal Trades' Review, July 5. 

NEW YORK METAL MARKETS. 

TIN— There was more doing in spot tin 
iu London, the record sales amounting to 
12(1 tons, and the market showed a further 
advance of 7s. 6d., closing firm. Mean- 
while futures are tending downward in the 
English market. The early cable showed a 
decline of £1 since last night, but later 5s. 
of this loss was recovered. The Singapore 
quotation c. i. f. London stood at .£117 5s., 
against CI 19 yesterday. Spot tin was dull 



THE 



CANADA 

PAINT 

COMPANY 

k> LIMITED 

Montreal and Toronto 



are the Leading Manufacturers 
of Colors, Varnishes and Paints 
in the Dominion of Canada, for 
home and export trade. FIRST 
HANDS for everything used by 
Decorator, Painter or Finisher. 

Makers of Coach Builders' 
Specialties. 

Catalogues, 
Color Cards and 
Close Prices 
upon application to 

THE 

CANADA 

PAINT 

COMPANY 

LIMITED 

Montreal and Toronto 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



15 



in t Iif New York market, and at the close 
prices wore nominal at 27.60 to 27.80c. 
Sales of 25 tons July were mane at 27.45e. 
Futures were not mentioned. As intimated 
yesterday, shipments from the Straits for 
the first half of .July were large, being 
2,1(50 tons; compared with ],290 ton^ for 
corresponding period last year. There have 
been further arrivals of 150 tons, making 
the total since duly 1, 1,351 tons. — 

COPPER— The situation in this market 
has undergone no change, the demand being 
light and prices steady at 17c. for Lake 
Superior and IG o-Sc. for electrolytic and 
casting. The statistics of production pub- 
lished to-daj give the output for June as 
_'2,lol tons, and for the six months as 133,- 
.''.'.)1 tuns, against Kil.577 tons for the same 
period last year. The upward movement in 
London was checked to-day, the nun Let 
reacting, and closed 5s. lower on spot and 
6s. 3d. on futures. There was comparative- 
ly little done in the former, but futures 
were fairly active. 

IMG LEAD— Nothing new was presented 
in this market, which closed steady but 
quiet at the old quotation of 4.37 l-2c. for 
kits iif 50 tons or more. In St. Louis con 
ditions were much the same as for some 
time past, prices being maintained under 
small supplies and mure or less demand at 
4.25 to 4.30c. for soft ^ILsimri and 1.35 to 
4.40c. tin chemical. The London market 
was unchanged. 

SPELTER— The market remains dull, 
with prices nominal and rather easy at 3.90 
tu 3.95c. St. Louis remained quiet at 
3.80c. London cabled an advance of 5s. 

REGULUS ANTIMONY— The market i> 
quiet but steady and unchanged at 8 1-2 to 
ID I- !c. as tu brand. 

OLD METALS— Trade is dull and prices 
are somewhat nominal. 

IKON— The iron markets are in a quiet 
condition, the business in progress being 

almost wholly in the nature of deliveries on 
existing contracts or small purchases to 
cover -nine passing needs. The develop- 
ment and progress of the strike ordered bj 
the Amalgamated Association is being 
watched with interest, but it is held to be 
altogether too soon to calculate its effects 
upon trade, 

T1NPLATE The market remains quiet 
and without nets- feat irrcs. 



STRIKES KILLED THE STOVE TRADE 

TWENTY years ago the cities of Albany 
and Troy were the centres of stove 
manufacture in America. About 
that time the competition of some western 
points began to lie felt. While the stove 
manufacturers of Albany and Troy appre- 
ciated tin danger, their skilled employes, 
banded together in a strong moulders' 
union, ignored it and argued that the then 
existing conditions could not lie changed. 
Their locality was nearer the source of the 
pig iron supply, says Mr. It. W. Hunt, in 
Cassier's Magazine, and could, therefore, 
always command cheaper iron ; and beyond 
all. no other points had the same moulding 
sand, and, without that, successful competi- 
tion against Troj ami Albany stoves was 
impossible. So strike followed strike. In 
many of these the men carried their points. 
The conditions governing the employment of 
apprentices, the hours of labor-, and the 
~;ii;inii)it of work produced per mail were all 
satisfactorily controlled; but the develop- 
ment of the natural resources of the -real 
American Northwest was not. To-day the 
blast furnaces of the Hudson River Valley 
are a tradition, and the stove foundries of 



BUTLER'S 



FAMOUS 



Sheffield Cutlery. 



Fish and Dessert Knives ; Spoons and Forks : 
Cabinets and Cases of Cutlery and Plate. 



DITTI CD" was registered as a 



Trade Mails, A.D. 1T68. 



Sole Makers of the celebrated 

"KEEN" Razors, "CAVENDISH" 

brand of Table Knives and Carvers. 



HIGHEST AWARDS. 



SPECIAL MENTION. 



—Full Line of Samples and stock at — 

Qeorge Butler & Co.'s 

kSWooM: 62 HOLB0RN VIADUCT, E.C. 

(Over Snow Hill Station.) 
MANUFACTORY : 

Trinity Works, SHEFFIELD, ENG. 



Troy and Albany are diverted to other uses, 
or- less crumbling ruins ; while those of 
Detroit, Aurora, Milwaukee, and other cities 
farther west arc echoing the thud of the 

hammer, the clank of the moulding machine, 
and the blast of the cupola. 



THE RIGHT TEMPERATURE FOR 
VARNISH. 

VARNISH is so often applied under 
unsatisfactory conditions of tem- 
perature and is subjected to such 
extremes of heat and cold while it is kept 
in stock, that many unsatisfactory jobs are 
thought to In.' the fault of the varnish, 
when really the trouble is all due to the 
w rone temperature. 
The best temperature for the varnishing 

room is 70 degrees. It is necessary in 
order to. produce the best results, to have 
the varnish and the surface oxer which it 
is to be applied of about the same tem- 
perature as thi' n i. If tin' room is too 

ccfld the varnish is liable to run. will not 
dry satisl'actoi il\ and nun pit. If the Sur- 
face is too cold the result is apt to be 
much the same as if the room were cold. 
The pitting may be accounted for by the 
varnish contracting after it has been spread 
i.iut over a cold surface. 

If the varnish is cold it will be too 
heavy, will work hard and it will be almost 
impossible to get a good, smooth, finished 
-in face. 

To keep the varnish at right temperature 
it. is well to keep it in a cool place in sum- 
mer and a warm place in winter. It should 
never be stored in cold, damp cellars nor in 
extremelj cold rooms, where there is no heat 
in winter. If it is not possible to keep it 
in a place that is warm enough it is advis- 



able to briny the varnish into the room 
lone enough before using, so that it may 
become thoroughly warmed through. It is 
well to warm the cup before putting varn- 
ish into it. It might do to put the can on 
a radiator for a while, being careful to 
open it first. It should not be allowed to 
eel hot though, as this would make the 
varnish too thin, and would be apt to 
cause it to pit if applied when it was much 
warmer than the surface. 

In cold weather it is well, if possible, to 
do the varnishing in the morning, so as to 
have the benefit of the warmer air during 
the day to assist the drying. 

In short, to get the best results varnish 
should not be exposed to extremes of heat 
or- cold. We keep our varnish storage 
buildings at a temperature of about 71) 
degrees all the year 'round. Then in 
applying varnish the most satisfactory 
results will be obtained if the room, the 
varnish and the surface are all at about a 
temperature of 70 degrees.— W. R. Sieplein 
in The Chameleon. 



PERSONAL MENTION. 

Mr. C. R. Pcckover, of R. A. Baines' 
staff, Toronto, is holidaying in Salisbury, 
Ont. 

Mr. Albert H. Hough, Toronto, Western 
representative of the Montreal Rolling Mills 
Co., is holidaying on the Coast. 

Mr. E. W. McCarty, representing J. C 
McCarty & Co., New York, was in Toronto 
this week and called on the wholesale hard- 
ware trade. 



16 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




D 



QUEBEC MARKETS 

Montreal, July 10, 1901. 
HARDWARE. 

RSPITE the hot weather a season- 
able business lias been done during 

I he past week : in fact, the out 
look is more encouraging - . The Province- of 
Quebec account is much more hopeful. The 
immense haj crop has materially improved 
the condition of the countrj and dealers are 
now ordering with more freedom. There 
have been a \\\ failures in this district but 
fortunately their number is limited. Little 
mOlie\ is coming from the Northwest, but 

little has I n expected. The market does 

not show many new features. The iron 
market remains very firm and the advances 
on cut nails, iron pipe and bar iron are 
ieadii\ obtained. Harvest tools are in 

brisk demand and scythes are reported 
scarce. Quite a few free/ers and refrigera- 
tors are still selling as well as a surprising 

number <>f lawn mowers. Quite a number 
of travellers are in the city arranging their 
fall samples, and. indeed, the fall trade ma\ 
now be said to be commencing. Guns are 
being inquired for, ammunition is beginning 
to sell, and orders for axes and shovels are 
being booked. Sheet metals continue 

extreme]} scarce, with wire plates unobtain- 
able in large quantities. 

BARB WIRE— The demand for barb wire 



is prettj well over for the season. Stocks 
in wholesalers' hands are not large. The 
price is still $3.05 per 100 lb. f.o.b. Mont- 
real. 

GALVANIZED WIRE— The amount, of 
new business now passing is not large, 
trading being confined to sorting orders. 
We quote No. 5, $4.25 ; Nos. 6, 7 and 8 
gauge, $3.55; No. 9, $3.10; No. 10, $3.75; 
No. II. $3.85; No. 12, 83.25; No. 13, 
83.35 : No. I I. $4.25 ; No. 15, $4.75 ; No. 
16, $5. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE— There is still 
a Fair demand reported. The market 
is steady. We quote oiled and 

annealed as follows : No. 9, $2.80 ; No. 10, 
S2.N7; No. 11, $2.90; No. 12, $2.95; No. 13, 
$3.15 per 100 lb. f.o.b. Montreal. Toronto. 
Hamilton. London. St. John and Halifax. 

FINE STEEL WIRE— A small trade is 
passing at the old discount. 17 1-2 percent. 

BRASS ANT) COPPER— This line is 
featureless this week. The discounts are 
55 and 2 1-2 per cent, on brass, and 50 and 
2 1-2 per cent, on copper. 

FENCE STAPLES— The demand is lim- 
ited just now. We quote $3.25 for bright, 
and .s:!.7"> for galvanized, per keg of loo 
lb. 

WIRE NAILS— The heavy demand con- 
tinues and there is still difficulty found 
in securing enough I 1-2 nails to fill large 
orders. We quote $2.85 for small lots and 



$2.77 1-2 for carlots, f.o.b. Montreal, Lon- 
don. Toronto. Hamilton and Gananoque. 
CUT NAM. S— There is no change to re 

port. The advance has not injured t he- 

sales. We quote $2.45 for small and $2.35 
for carlots ; flour barrel nails, 25 per cent. 
discount ; coopers' nails, 30 per cent dis- 
count. 

HORSK NAILS -Horse nails are begin-* 

ning to move in larger quantities. The 
discounts are unchanged. "C" brand is held 

at ;i disce t of ."ill and 7 I 2 per cent . off t he 

new list. " M " brand is quoted at 60 per 

cent, off old list on Oval and city head, and 

662-3 per cent, off count ersiink head. Mon- 
arch's discount is 66 2-3 per cent., and 70 
per cent, in 25-box lots. 
HORSESHOES— Some inquiries have been 

received this week, but business is not 
heav'3 in this line. We quote as follows: 
Iron shoes, light and medium pattern, No. 

2 and larger, $3.50 ; No. I and smaller. 
s:',.75 : snow shoes. No. -J and larger, *o.7.">: 

No. I and smaller, X I ; X I. steel shoes, all 

sizes, I to 5, No. 2 and larger, $3.60 ; No. 
I and smaller. $3.85; feather-weight, all 

sizes. $4.85; toe weight steel shoes, all 
si/es. $5.95 f.o.b. Montreal ; f.o.b. Hamil 
ton. London and (iuelpli. lOc. extra. 

POULTRY NETTING Stocks areagain 
complete and dealers are selling at a dis- 
count of •")") per cent. 

GREEN WIRE CLOTH— There is still 



THE FAMOUS ACTIVE RANGE. 




door. 



Made in 42 styles and sizes. 

Burns coal, coke or wood. 

Has ventilated oven and thermometer on oven 

The most perfect cooking range made. 



We have improved many of our last year's stoves, 
and also added some new lines, making our list of 
cooking and heating stoves and ranges the largest 
and best assorted in Canada. 

Write for our new pocket price list just issued. 

We will also be pleased to supply you free with 
any advertising matter you can use to advantage. 



LONDON, TORONTO, 



h Shelf. 

McC 

MONTREAL, 



l_ARY M 



WINNIPEG, 



VANCOUVER 



AND 



ST. JOHN, N.B. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



17 



THE PACE-HERSEY 
IRON & TUBE GO. 



Limited 



Montreal 

Man ufacturers of j 

Wrought Iron Pipe 

For Water, Gas, Steam, Oil, 
Ammonia and Machinery. 

DRAIN PIPES, 
PORTLAND CEMENTS, 
FIRE BRICKS AND CLAY 
SILICA AND MAGNESIA 
BRICKS, 

with specially prepared mortar. 

Contractors' and Founders' 
Supplies. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

31 WELLINGTON ST., MONTREAL 

. . FULL STOCK . . 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWER APE 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

^ CANADIAN SEWER PIPE CO. 

HAMILTON, ONT. TORONTO, ONT. 

ST. JOHNS, QUE. 



Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers of 



Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND "DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery where great strength 
<s required ; Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



quite a quantity of wire cloth called for. We 
quote §1.35, 

SCREEN DOORS AND WINDOWS 
Some fresh orders are still received. Prices 
are unchanged. We quote; Screen 

doors, plain cherry finish, S7.:;n per 
doz.; do. fancy, §11.50 per cloz.; walnut. 
§7.30 per doz., and yellow, $7.45; windows, 
§2.25 to §3.50 per doz. 

SCREWS— Large quantities of crews have 
been sold this week. Discounts are; Flat head 
bright, n" 1-2 and 10 per cent, off list , ; 
round head, bright, 82 1-2 and 10 per cent.; 
flat head, brass, 80 and 10 per cent.; round 
head, brass, 75 and 10 per cent. 

BOLTS The demand has been verj brisk 
this year and it continues in undiminished 
ratio. Discounts are as follows : Nor 
«a\ carriage bolts, 65 per cent.; common, 60 

per cent.; machine bolts, (ill per cent.; 
coach screws. 70 per cent.; sleigh shoe bolts, 
72 I '_' per cent.; blank bolts, 7(1 per cent.; 
boll «'iu Is. 62 1-2 per cent.: plough bolts, (ill 
per cent.; tire bolts. G7 1-2 per cent.; stove 
bolts. 07 1-2 per cent. To any retailer an 
extra discount, of 5 per cent, is allowed. 
Nuts, square, 4c. par lb. off list ; hexagon 
nuts, 1 I- lc. per lb. off list. To all retail- 
ers an extra discount of 1-lc. per lb. is 
allowed. 

BUILDING PAPER Fair amounts are 
selling. We quote as follows ; Tarred 
felt, -SI. 70 per 100 lb. ; 2-pl.\ read} 
roofing, 80c. per roll ; 3-ply, §1.05 
per roll ; carpet felt, $2.25 'per 100 
lb.; dry sheathing, 30c. per roll ; tar sheath- 
ing, lllc. per roll ; ih\ fibre, 50c. per roll ; 
laired fibre, 60c. per roll ; O.K. and I.X.L.. 
05c. per roll ; heavy straw sheathing, §23 
per ton ; slaters' felt, 50c. per roll. 

RIVETS AND BURRS— There is a change 
to report. Discounts on best iron rivets, sec- 
tion, carriage, and wagon box, black rivets, 
tinned do., coopers' rivets and tinned 
swede's rivets, 60 and 10 per cent. 
swedes iron burrs are quoted at 55 percent. 
off ; copper rivets, :',5 and 5 per cent, off ; 
and coppered iron rivets and burrs, in 5 lb. 
carton boxes, are quoted at 60 and III per 
cent, off list. 

BINDER TWINE— Those who bought 
earl\ in the season before the advances are 
selling good quantities of binder twine. 
We quote as follows: Blue Ribbon, II I -2c; 
Red Cap, 9 3-4c; Tiger, 8 3-4c; Golden 
Crown, 8c.; Sisal, 8 l-4c. 

CORDAGE— This market continues to 
evince considerable activity. Prices are 
steady. Manila is worth 13 l-2c per II). 
for 7-16 and larger ; sisal brings 10c. and 
lath yarn, 10c. 

EARVEST TOOLS— All kinds of harvest 
tools are lively, sorting orders making up 
a brisk trade. Scythes are in short sup- 
ply. The discount is 50, Hi ami 5 per 
cent. 

SPADES AND SHOVELS-In small 
request. The discount is in and 5 per 
cent . 

LAWN MOWERS— A few more sales are 
reported again this week. We quote : 

High wheel, 50 and 5 per cent, f.o.b. Mont- 
real ; low wheel, in all sizes, $2.75 each 
net; high wheel, 1 1-inch. 30 per cent. off. 

FIREBRICKS— A verj small business is 
being done. We quote : Scotch at SI7.5II 

to S22. and English at §17 to §21 per Mum 
ex-wharf. 

CEMENT— There is a fair demand for 
cement, principally German and American. 
\\,. quote : German cement, $2.85 to 
§2.50 ; English, $2,;25 to $2J55 ; Belgian, 
$1,711 to $1.05 per bbl. ex wharf, and 
American, $2.30 to $2.45, ex cars. 



Bar, 

Hoop, 

Sheet, 



STEEL 



Plates, 
Angles, 
Shapes 



FOR PROHPT IflPORT AT 
LOWEST PRICES. 



Sanderson's Tool Steel 



In Stock at Montreal. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 

MONTREAL. 




IRON AND 
BRASS 



Pumps 



Foroe, Lift and Cistern 
Hand and Power. 

For all duties. We can 
supply your wants with 
— quality the best and 
prices right. Catalogues 
and full information for a 
request. 



THE It. McDOUGALL CO., Limited 

Manufacturers, Gait, Canada. 

ADAM HOPE & CO. 

Hamilton, Ont. 

We have in stock 

pig tin 
ingot copper 
lake copper 

PIG- LEAD 
SPELTER 
ANTIMONY 

WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS. 

Nova Scotia Steel Go. 

Limited 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 

Manufacturers of 

Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIBMENS MARTIN 

Open Hearth Steel 



18 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



If you are looking for a high-grade 
Finish for floors 



biranitine [!°? [ . 

Finish 



is unsurpassed in durability and beauty of finish for natural 
wood and parquette floors, linoleums, oil cloth, cork matting, 
etc. Its transparency reveals the grain of the wood and its 
preserving qualities increase the life of the floor. 

It is easier applied, more durable, makes better finish than 
wax preparations, and is free from all 

Unpleasant Slipperiness. . 

Moving furniture or boot heels do not leave white marks, 
nor does soap, mud or water destroy its fine appearance. 

SEND FOR SAMPLE ORDER. 



MANUFACTUHED ONLY BY 



The 



T l? Imperial Varnish & Color Co. 



TORONTO, ONT., CANADA. 



LIMITED 



Binder Twine Binder Twine 

The John Bowman 
Hardware & Coal Co., 

London, Ont. 

Write us for close prices on 
best quality American 
Binder Twine. 

Binder Twine Binder Twine 



METALS. 

The manufactured iron market is steady 
at the advances in liar iron and pipe, while 
pig iron remains as before. '1 he sheet 
metals are firm with some (if them decidedly 
scarce Terne plates cannot be had in 10- 
box lots, except at a high premium. Ship- 
ments contracted fur from England in June 
have not been despatched yet. 

PIG IKON-There seems to be little de- 
mand for piy iron just now and only a few 
transactions are occurring at §20 to §"20.50 

for No. I Sumnierlee, and §17.50 to §18 for 
( 'anadian. 

BAR IRON— The advance in bar iron is 
maintained and dealers are getting §1.8(1 to 
11.85 for merchants' bar and §2,10 to $2,15 
for horseshoe. 

BLACK SHEETS- The demand is 
moderate and supplies light. We quote : 
8 to 16 gauge, §2.50 to 82,00 ; 26 gauge. 
82.55 to 82,05. and 2s eauue, §2.00 to 
§2.70. 

GALVANIZED [RON-A fair trade is 
being done in this line at firm prices. We 
quote as follows : No. 2s Queen's Head. 
81.25; Apollo, 10 3-4 oz., 81.25, and Comet, 
Si, with 25c. extra in less than case lots. 

COPPER— Is firm at 17 31 to 18c. 

INGOT TIN-Lamb and Flag is worth 
32 3-4 to 33c. 

LEAD— The market is rather easv at 
83.50 per 100 lb. 

LEAD PIPE— There is a constant inquiry 
reported by the trade. We quote 7c. for 
ordinary and 7 l-2c. for composition waste, 
with 30 pci- 'lii! . off. 

IRON PIPE — There is quite a strong 
demand for pipe just now and the higher 
prices are being obtained. We (juote as 



follows ; Black pipe, 1-1, 82. so per 
100 ft. ; 3-8, §2.80 ; 1-2, §3 ; 3-4, §3.30 ; 
l-in., §4.75 ; 1 1-4, §6.45 ; 1 1-2, §7.75 ; 
2-in.. §10.35. Galvanized, 1-2, §4.60; 3-4, 
§5.25; l-in., §7.50; 11-4, §9.80; 11-2. 
§11.75 ; 2-in., §16. 

TINPLATES— There is no change to re- 
port. Stocks are quite light, with the 
demand limited. We quote: Coke plates, 
83.75 to §1: charcoal, si. 25 to §4.50; 
extra quality, §5 to §5.10. 

CANADA PLATE— The inquiries for Can- 
ada plate have not been numerous during 

the past week. We quote : 52's, §2.45 ; 
Oil's, S2.55 ; 75's, 82.60 ; full polished, 83, 
and galvanized, §3.90. 

STEEL— Unchanged. We quote : Sleigh- 
shoe, §2.00; tire, 82.05 ; bar, §2; spring, 
§2.75 ; machinery, §2.75, and toe-calk. 
§2.50. 

SHEET STEEL— We quote: Gauges, No.. 
10 to 20, §2.5(1. 

TOOL STEEL-Black Diamond, 8c. and 
Jessop's, 13c. 

TERNE PLATES— High values have been 
obtained in certain transactions this week. 
Coods are very scarce. They arc worth 
§7.50 to §7.75.' 

COIL CHAIN— A fail- business is passing 
in coil chain at firm prices. We quote : 
\... (i. I2]-2c; No. 5, 10 1 -2c. ; No. 4. 
10c; No. 3, 9 1-lc. ; 1-1-inch, 7 1-lc. per 
lb.: 5-16, §4.75: 5-10 exact. §5.2(1; 3-8, 
si. 20 : 7-16, §4; 1-2, §3.80; 9-16, §3.70: 
5-8, 83.50 : 3-4, §3.45 ; 7-8, §3.40 ; l-in., 
83.40. In carload lots an allowance of 10c. 
is made. 

SHEET ZINC— In fair demand at 85.75 

(o so. 

ANTIMONY-Quiet, at 10c. 



ZINC SPELTER-Is worth 5c. 
SOLDER-We quote : Bar solder, 18 l-2c.; 



wire solder, 20c. 



GLASS. 



The market is steady and the demand 
well maintained. We quote as follows : 
First break. 82.10; second, §2.20 for 50 
feet: first break, 100 feet, 83.90; second, 
si. Mi; third. §4.00; fourth, 84.85; fifth, 
S5.35 ; sixth. §5.85, and seventh. §6.35. 
PAINTS AND OILS. 

Considering that this is now the hot 
season the demand for paints is very encour- 
aging. The feature of the trade has been 
the extraordinary rush for paris green and 
some manufacturers have even been com- 
pelled to make extra quantities. Linseed 
oil is stationary just now. as is also tur- 
pentine. We quote : 

WHITE LKAD— Best brands. Government 
standard. §6.25 ; No. 1, §5.87 1-2 ; No. 2. 
§5.50; No. 3, §5.12 1-2, and No. 4, 84.75 
all f.o.b. Montreal. Terms, 3 per cent. 
cash or four months. 

DRY WHITE LKAD-§5.25 in casks ; 
kegs, §5.50. 

RED LEAD— Casks, §5: in kegs, s:>.25. 

DRY WHITE ZINC— Pure, dry. Oil..; 
No. 1, 5 l-4c. ; in oil, pure, 7 l-4c. : No. I. 
I lc. ; No. 2. 5 l-4c. 

PUTTY— We quote : Bulk, in barrels. 
§1.90 per 100 lb. ; bulk, in less quantity. 
§2.05 ; bladders, in barrels, §2.10 ; bladders. 
in 100 or 200 lb. kegs or boxes, 82.25 ; in 
tins. 82.55 to §2.65; in less than 100-lb. 
lots, §3 f.o.b. Montreal. Ottawa. Toronto, 
Hamilton, London and Guelph. Maritime 
Provinces, 10c. higher, f.o.b. St. John and 
Halifax. 

LINSEED OIL— Raw, S3c: boiled, 86c. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



19 



in 5 to 9 bbls., lc. less ; 10 to 20 bbl. lots, 
open, net cash, plus 2c. for 4 months. 
Delivered anywhere in Ontario between 
Montreal and Oshawa at 2c. per gal. advance 
and freight allowed. 

TURPENTINE— Single bbls., 55c; 2 to 4 ' 
libls., 54c; 5 bbls. and over, open terms. 
the same terms as linseed oil. 

MIXED PAJNTS-ftl .20 to $1.45 per gal. 

CASTOR OIL— 8 3-4 to «.i l-4c. in whole- 
sale lots, and l-2c. additional for small 

Ids. 

SEAL OIL-47 1-2 to 49c. 

COD 01L-:J2 1-2 to 35c. 

NAVAL STOKES— We quote . Resins, 
§2.75 to 84.50, as to brand : coal tar, 13.25 
Flo $3.75 ; cotton waste. 1 1-2 to 5 l-2e. for 
colored, and. (i to 7 L-2c. For white ; oakum, 
5 1-2 to (i I -2c, and cotton oakum, L0 to 
lie 

PARIS GREEN— Petroleum barrels, is 
3-4c. per lb.; arsenic, kegs, ICc; 50 and L00- 
lli. drums, 19 l-2c; 25-11). drums, 20c; 111.. 
packages, 20 l-2e. ; 1-2-11). packages, 22 
L-2c ; I II). tins, 21 l-2c : l-2-lb. tins, 2:', 
l-2c. f.o.K. Montreal : terms .'! per cent. 30 
days, or four months from date of delivery. 
SCRAP METALS. 

We have no change to report From last 
week. The market has been rather dull 
and values are not well maintained 
Dealers are now paying the following prices 
in the country : Heavy copper and wire, 13 
1-2 ti> I le. per lii. : liuht copper, 12 to 12 
l-2e. ; heavy brass, 12 to 121.2c ; heavy 
yellow, 8 [-2 to 9c. : light, brass, 6 1-2 to 
7c ; lead. 2 1-2 to 2 3- lc per II). : zinc, 2 
1-4 to 2 l-2c ; iron, No. I wrought, SI I to 
$16 per gross ton f.o.b. Montreal ; No. 5 
cast, $13 tn si | : stove plate, $8 to $9 : 
light iron, No. 2. S| ;i ton ; malleable and 
steel, s| ; rags, country, 60 to 70c. per 100 
lb. ; old rubbers, li 3-1 to 7 l-4c. per II). 
HIDES. 

The advance values are well maintained 
although business is not exceedingly brisk. 
We quote as follows : Light hides, 7c. for 
No. I ; Gc. for No. 2, and 5c for No. 3. 
Lambskins, L5c; sheepskins, 90c to SI ; 
calfskins, 10c for No. I and 8c. for No. 2. 
II & M 

MARKET NOTES. 

Mr. Alexander Cilili. who represents W. 

Gilbertson & Co., Limited, makers of 
"Comet " brand of galvanized iron, reports 
that the sales for this season have been 
very much In excess of any previous year. 
The prcimpt deliveries have been gratifying. 



ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Toronto, July 19, 1901. 

HARDWARE. 

BUSINESS, while not as active as it 
was, is still better than might be 
expected, taking into account the 
fact that the travellers of some of the whole- 
sale houses are taking their holidays. Letter 
orders are quite liberal, especially for such 
harvest tools as forks and scythes. Business 
is being well maintained in wire nails, and 
shingle nails of both the wire and cut 
descriptions are in good demand. In fence 
wires, business is gradually diminishing. 
The demand for oil stoves is still one of the 
features of the trade. In screws, rivets and 
burrs and bolts, the demand continues 



good. A fair business is being done in 
both tinware and enamelled ware. Rope 
for hay fork purposes continues in active 
request. Quite a good business is still to 
be noted in screen doors and windows, and 
a little green wire cloth continues to move 
out. The demand for ice cream freezers 
continues good. Stove and furnace manu- 
facturers report that they are booking quite 
a few orders on future account. Payments 
are, on the whole, fair. 

Barb Wire — Business has got into 
smaller compass, and although the mills 
are shipping much much promptly than 
they were, a little delay is still being ex- 
perienced. We quote : 83 05 per 100 lb. 
from stock Toronto; and $282^ f.o.b. 
Cleveland for less than carlots, and 82.70 
for carlots. 

Galvanized Wire— A little business is 
being done, but the demand is not active. 
We quote : Nos. 6, 7 and 8, S3. 50 to 83.85 
per 100 lb., according to quantity ; No. 9, 
82.85 to 83.15 ; No. 10, 83-6o to 83.95 ; 
No. 11, 83- 70 to 84 10 ; No. 12. 83 to 

83 30 ; No. 13, 83 10 to 83 40 ; No. 14, 

84 10 to 84 50 ; No. 15. 84 60 to 85 °5 : 
No. 16, 84 85 to 85-35- Nos. 6 to 9 base 
f.o.b. Cleveland are quoted at 8 2 -57Ji in 
less than carlots and 12c. less for carlots of 
15 tons. 

Smooth Steel Wire — Being between 
the seasons, the demand for oiled and 
annealed wire is naturally not large. The 
movement in hay-baling wire is still 
light. Net selling prices for oiled and 
annealed are as follows : Nos. 6 to 8, $2. 90; 
9. 8280; 10,82.87 ; 11, 82.90; 12, 82.95; 
13. S31S; ! 4. $3-37; 15. S3. 50; 16, 
83 65. Delivery points, Toronto, Hamilton, 
London and Montreal, with freights equal- 
ized on those points. 

Wire Nails — There does not appear 
to be any falling off in the demand, and the 
movement continues good. There is quite 
a demand for shingle nails. The base price 
is still 82. 85 for less than carlots, and 
$1-77% for carlots. Delivery points 
Toronto, Hamilton, London, Gananoque 
and Montreal. 

Cut Nails — A good demand is still 
being experienced for cut shingle nails. 
Otherwise very little is being done in cut 
nails. The base price is 82. 45 per keg for 
less than carlots, and 82.35 for carlots. 
Delivery points : Toronto, Hamilton, 
London, Montreal and St. John, N.B. 

Horse Nails — Still a light business 
only is to be noted. Discount on "C" 
brand, oval head, 50 and 7% per cent, 
off new list, and on "M" and other 
brands, 50, 10 and 5 per cent, off the old 
list. Countersunk head 60 per cent. 

Horseshoes— Business is only moderate. 
We quote as follows : f.o.b. Toronto : Iron 




OUR METALLIC 
CEILINGS^WALLS 

Are both artistic and serviceable. 
Popularly used by practical people 
everywhere. 



J r 



VtJr^tVn 



Easily applied — most moderate in 
cost — fire-proof, sanitary and won- 
derfully durable — with countless 
designs to select from. 
Write us for booklet telling all about them. 

METALLIC ROOFING CO., Limited 

Wholesale Mfrs. TORONTO, CANADA. 



Our Sheet 
Metal Fronts 



Offer you splendid improvement, at 
small cost, for any style of building:. 

We make them complete, to suit 
any sized or shaped structure — the 
entire metal finish including door and 
window caps, cornices, etc. — in a great 
variety of styles. 

They give a very handsome effect, 
and enduring, practical satisfaction. 

We give estimates if you send 
measurements and outline of the build- 
ing. 

Think it over. 

Metallic Roofing Co., 

Limited, 

Wholesale Manufacturers, 

Toronto, Canada. 



shoes, No. 2 and larger, light, medium and 
heavy, 8360 ; snow shoes, 8385 ; light 
steel shoes, 83-7°; featherweight (all sizes), 
84.95; ' ron shoes, No. 1 and smaller, light, 
medium and heavy (all sizes), 83-85 ; snow 
shoes, 84 ; light steel shoes, 83-95; feather- 
weight (all sizes), 84-95- 

Screws — A good steady trade continues 
to be the feature in this line. Discounts : Flat 
head bright, 87^ and 10 per cent. ; round 
head bright, 82^ and 10 per cent. ; flat head 
brass, 80 and 10 per cent. ; round head brass, 
75 and 10 per cent. ; round head bronze, 



'20 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



65 per cent., and flat head bronze at 70 
per cent. 

Rivets and Burrs — A fairly good busi- 
ness continues to be done and prices are 
steady and unchanged. We quote : 
Iron rivets, 60 and 10 per cent.; iron 
burrs, 55 per cent.; copper rivets and 
burrs, 25 and 5 per cent. 

Bolts and Nuts — Activity is still the 
feature of trade in bolts and nuts, and prices 
are steady and unchanged. We quote: Car- 
riage bolts (Norway), full square, 65 percent. ; 
carriage bolts full square, 65 percent.; com- 
mon carriage bolts, all sizes, 60 per cent.; 
machine bolts, all sizes, 60 per cent. ; coach 
screws, 70 per cent.; sleighshoe bolts, 72^ 
per cent. ; blank bolts, 60 per cent. ; bolt 
ends, 62^ per cent.; nuts, square, 4c. off; 
nuts, hexagon, 4^c. off; tire bolts, 67% 
per cent.; stove bolts, 67 yi ; plough bolts, 
60 per cent. ; stove rods, 6 to 8c. 

Rope — There does not yet appear to be 
any falling off in the demand for rope 
for hay-fork purposes, especially in the 
j^-in. size. The base price of manila is 
unchanged at I3^c per lb. and sisal at 

IOC. 

Binder Twine — Some sorting up is being 
done. We quote : Pure manila, 650 ft., 
12c; manila, 600 ft., 9j£c. ; mixed, 550 ft., 
8j£c; mixed, 500 ft., 8 to 8^c. 

Sporting Goods — A small business only 
is reported this week. 

Cutlery — The movement is light. 

Enamelled Ware and Tinware — 
A fair trade is being done in both these 
lines. 

Oil Stoves — The demand continues 
active, but the depleted condition of stocks 
is interfering with business. 

Ice Cream Freezers and Refriger- 
ators — There is still quite a demand for 
ice cream freezers. Inquiries are still being 
received for refrigerators, but stocks are 
much depleted. 

Green Wire Cloth — There is some 
movement in this line, but it does not 
amount to much. Price is unchanged at 
$1.35 per 100 square ft. 

Screen Doors and Windows — There 
is rather a surprisingly good demand, con- 
sidering the lateness of the season, being 
experienced for window screens. A few 
screen doors are also wanted, but stocks in 
these are much depleted. We quote : 
Screen doors, 4 in. styles, $7.20 to #7.80 
per doz.; ditto, 3 in. styles, 20c. per doz. 
less ; screen windows, $1.60 to $3.60 per 
doz., according to size and extension. 

Building Paper — A good business is 
still to be noted. We quote : Building 
paper, 30c; tarred paper, 40c, and tarred 
roofing, $1.65. 

Foultry Netting — The movement is 
only light. Discount 55 per cent. 



Harvest Tools — Some grain cradles 
are being asked for, and there is a lot of 
tools generally going out, particularly forks 
and scythes. The demand appears to even 
exceed anticipations. Discount, 50, 10 and 
5 per cent. 

Spades and Shovels — A few scoops 
are going out, but in spades and shovels 
generally the movement is light. Discount, 
40 and 5 per cent. 

Eavetrough — A fair quantity has gone 
out during the past week. Ten-inch is 
quoted at 53.25 per 100 ft. 

Stoves and Furnaces — The travellers 
are putting in their best efforts before taking 
their holidays, and quite a number of 
orders have been booked for fall delivery. 

Cement — There is no change. A big 
trade is doing. Prices are firm. We quote 
barrel lots as follows : Canadian port- 
land, $2.25 to $2.75 ; German, $3 to $3.15; 
English, #3 ; Belgian, $2.50 to #2.75 ; 
Canadian hydraulic, $1.25 to $1.50. 
METALS. 

There is a little more doing in pig iron. 
In metals generally trade is seasonably 
quiet. Some import orders are still being 
placed for Canada plates, tinplates and 
galvanized sheets. 

Pig Iron — Foundrymen are placing 
orders for the next three months' supply, 
and business is in consequence more active 
than it was. We hear of transactions in 
Ontario pig iron at $17.50 for No. 2 in two 
and three hundred ton lots. Local buyers 
report that it is at present difficult to get 
delivery of pig iron from the Sydney 
furnaces. 

Bar Iron — The mills are still rushed 
with business and base price is firm at $1.85 
to $1.90 per 100 lb. 

Steel — Trade continues good in most 
lines of steel and prices firm. We quote : 
Merchantable cast steel, 9 to 15c. per 
lb.; drill steel, 8 to 10c. per lb. ; "B C" and 
"Black Diamond" tool steel, 10 tone; 
Jessop's, Morton's and Firth's tool steel, 
12*4 to 13c. ; toe calk steel, $2.85 to $3; 
tire steel, $2 30 to $2.50; sleighshoe steel, 
$2. 10 to $2 25 ; reeled machinery steel, 
53; hoop steel, $3. 

Galvanized Sheets— An active busi- 
ness is being experienced, and both large 
and small lots are in demand. Some busi- 
ness is still being done on import account. 
The ruling quotation on 28 gauge is still 
$4.50 for English, and $4 40 for American. 

Black Sheets — Trade is fair, with 
stocks light. We quote : 28 gauge, com- 
mon at $3, and 26 gauge dead flat at $3.50. 

Canada Plates — A few import orders 
are still being booked, but business, gener- 
ally, is quiet. We quote all dull, 52.90 ; 
half polished, 53 ; and all bright, 53.50. 

Tin — Trading is in small lots. The New 



OAKEY'S 



The original and only Genuine Pre- 
paration for Cleining Cutlery. 
6d. and is. Canisters. 



WELLINGTON' 



KNIFE POLISH 



JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, London, England. 

Agent: 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL 



COVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, N Y. 

Steel Carriage and 

Wagon Jacks, 

Harness Snaps, Ch<>in, Rope and Web 
Goods, etc. 

FOR SALE BV JOBBERS ATMFRS. PRICES. 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 

B> it-i- - 'Zttl+W* Variety, 




L»rge«t Variety 
, Toilet, Hand, Electric Power 

. ARE THE BEST. 

Highert Quality Grooming and 
Sheep Shearing Machine* 

WE MAKE THEM. 

MND FOB OATALOGm TO 

aaarlaaa Skearar Mfg. Co., Raahoa, ».H.,C8i 




The Best Door Closer is . . . 

NEWMANS INVINCIBLE 

FLOOR SPRING 

Will close a door silently against, any pressure of 
wind. Has many working advantages over the 
ordinary spring, and has twice the wear. In nse 
throughout Great Britain and the Colonies. Gives 
perfect satisfaction. Made onlv hy 

W.NEWMAN & SONS, 
Hospital St., - BIRMINGHAM. 



Oneida Community Goods 

HALTERS, COW TIES, SNAPS, etc., etc., 

in all sizes and styles. May be had of all 
jobbers throughout Canada. 

Factory— NIAGARA FALLS, ONT. 



Mackenzie Bros. 

HARDWARE 
MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS, 



Travellers covering Mauitoba, I 
Northwest Territories and ! 



WINNIPEG, 

1 Columbia. MAN. 

Correspondence Solicited. 



THE PULLMAN PNEUMATIC 



Combined 



Door Check g ^ 
and Spring. 




for Screen Doors. Small, Simple, Strong, Perfect and 
Ornamental. Low in Price. 

PULLMAN SASH BALANCE CO.. 

ROCHESTER N.Y., U.S.A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



21 



York and London markets are weak. On 
Wednesday, spot tin dropped 7s. 6d. in 
London. Here quotations are unchanged 
at 31^ to 32c. per lb. 

Tinplates — The demand for both coke 
and charcoal plates is good. The demand 
is being stimulated by the strike among the 
tinplate workers in the United States. Our 
quotations on bright coke plates are 25c. 
higher, I.C. being quoted at $4. per box. 

Tinned Sheets — A moderate trade is 
reported. 

Terne Plates — The demand has been 
more active. Prices are 50c. higher, our 
quotations now being 58 50 for I.C. 

Copper— More business is being done in 
ingot copper and a fair trade is reported in 
sheet copper. We quote ingot at 17J/C, 
bars at 23 to 25c, sheet at 24 to 24^., 
and planished at 32c. 

Brass — The demand is moderate and 
the discount 10 per cent, on rod and sheet. 
Solder — A good business is being done 
in small lots. We quote as follows : 
Half and half, guaranteed, i<jy z c.\ ditto, 
commercial, 19c; refined, i8j£c, and 
wiping, 17c. 

Iron Pipe— Prices have been advanced 
on the larger sizes of black iron pipe from 
2'A'm. up, the change going into effect on 
Thursday afternoon. The new prices per 
100 ft. are as follows : 2^ in., $22.75 '. 
3 in., $30 ; 3% in., $37-5° ; 4 in., $42.75 ; 
4^-in., $51 50; 5-in., $57.50, and 6 in., 
$74.50. Inch pipe is unchanged at $5.40. 
No change has been made in galvanized 
pipe, 1 in. of which is still quoted at $7 .95. 
Lead — An amount of business is being 
done at 4X to 4^c. per lb. 

Zinc Spelter — More inquiry is heard, 
but sales are small and prices unchanged at 
5 "^ to 6c. per lb. There was an advance 
of 5s. in London on Tuesday, but this has 
since been lost and prices both there and in 
New York are weak at the moment. 

Zinc Sheets — Trade is quiet, and 
quotations are unchanged at 6^c. in cask 
lots and 6^c. in smaller quantities. 

Antimony — Trade keeps quiet and prices 
unchanged at 10^ to 11c. 

PAINTS AND OILS. 
The aggregate volume of business is not 
large. There is an active demand for paris 
green, but some jobbers have not yet 
followed, and do not seem disposed to 
follow the example of the manufacturers, 
who raised prices 2c. last week, and are 
still selling at 2c. below present quotations. 
*^A decline of 25c. per cwt. has been noted 
in genuine red lead, and 50c. per cwt. for 
No. 1. Litharge is ic. per lb. lower, and 
whiting is 5c. per lb. cheaper. There is 
now practically no East India castor oil on 




NICHOLSON F"ll_l 



OO. 



Providence, R.I., U.S.A. 



BRITISH PLATE GLASS COMPANY, Limited. 



Established 1773 



Manufacturers of Polished, Silvered, Bevelled. Chequered, and Rough Plate Glass. Also 

of a durable, highly-polished material called " MARBLETTE," suitable for Advertising Tablets, Signs, 
Facias, Direction Plates, Clock Faces, Mural Tablets, Tombstones, etc. This is supplied plain, embossed, 

or with incised gilt letters. Benders, Embossers, Brilliant Cutters, etc., etc. Estimates and 

Designs on application. 
Works: Ravenhead, St. Helens, Lancashire. Agencies : ioj_ Cannon Street, London E.C —128 Hope Street, Glas- 
gow— 1 2 East Parade, Leeds, and 36 Par dise Street, Birmingham. Telegraphic Address: "Glass, St. Helens" 
Telephone No. 68 St. Helens. 

f~ofr sale: 



RE-LAYING RAILS 



350 tons 56. rail and fastenings. 
75 tons 50. " 
20 tons 14. " " " 

Prompt Deliveries. Also Logging and Pit Rails. 



SESSENWEIN BROS., 101 Shannon Street, MONTREAL. 



STEVENS SINGLE BARREL SHOT GUN. 



LATEST AND 
BEST SINGLE 
GUN ON THE 
MARKET. 




MADE IN 
THREE STYLES 
THREE GAUGES 
UP-TO-DATE. 



FINEST SINGLE GUN VET PRODUCED. 

Our Goods are Handled by the Leadirg Jobb-rs. 

J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co., p °i,f ox Chicopee Falls, Mass., U.S.A. 



1 



the market and English oil is j£c. per lb. 
lower. We quote as follows: 

White Lead — Ex Toronto, pure white 
lead, $6.37^ ; No. 1, $6; No. 2. $5.67^ ; 
No. 3, $5.25; No. 4, #4.87 '^ ; genuine 
dry white lead in casks, 55-37J4- 

Red Lead — Genuine, in casks of 560 lb., 
$5.25; ditto, in kegs of 100 lb., $5.50 ; No. 
1, in casks of 560 lb., $4.50; ditto, kegs of 
100 lb., 54-75- 

Litharge — Genuine, 6% to 6_j£c. 

Orange Mineral — Genuine, 7^ to 8c. 

White Zinc — Genuine, French V.M., in 
casks, $7 to $7.25; Lehigh, in casks, 56. 

Paris White — 90c. to $1 per 100 lb. 

Whiting — 65c. per 100 lb. ; Gilders' 
whiting, 80c. 

Gum Shellac — In cases, 22c; in less 
than cases. 25c. 

Paris Green— Bbls., i8^c. ; kegs. 19c; 
50 and 100 lb. drums, i7^c; 25-lb. drums, 
20c. ; 1 lb. papers, 2o^c; i-lb. tins, 21 ^c. ; 
J^lb. papers, 22j£c; J^-lb. tins, 23#c. 

Putty — Bladders, in bbls., $2. 10; blad- 
ders, in 100 lb. kegs, $2.25; bulk in bbls., 
51.90 ; bulk, less than bbls. and up to 100 
lb., $2.05 ; bladders, bulk or tins, less than 
100 lb., $2.90. 

Plaster Paris — New Brunswick, $1.90 
per bbl. 

Pumice Stone — Powdered, $2.50 per 
cwt. in bbls., and 4 to 5c. per lb. in less 



lump, 10c. in small lots, and 8c. 



quantity 
in bbls. 

Liquid Paints— Pure, $1. 20 to 51.30 per 
gal. 

Castor Oil — English, in cases, 9% to 
ioc. per lb. and 10 to 10/^c. for single 
tins. 

Linseed Oil— Raw, 1 to 4 barrels, 84c; 
boiled, 87c; 5 to 9 barrels, raw, 81c. ; 
boiled, 84c, delivered. To Toronto, 
Hamilton, Guelph and London, ic. less. 

Turpentine — Single barrels, 55c; 2 
to 4 barrels, 54c, delivered. Toronto, 
Hamilton and London ic. less. For less 
quantities than barrels, 5c. per gallon extra 
will be added, and for 5 gallon packages, 
50c, and 10 gallon packages, 80c. will be 
charged. 

GLASS. 

The demand ftom stock keeps brisk, and 
as the arrivals of glass have been moderate, 
there is a scarcity of several sizes. There 
is no change in prices, however. We 
quote as follows: Under 26 in., 54.15 
26 to 40 in., 54.45 '» 4 1 t0 5° m -i 54 85; 
51 to 60 in., 55 15 ; 61 to 70 in., 55.50; 
double diamond, under 26 in., 56 ; 26 to 
40 in., $6.65 ; 41 to 50 in., 57So; 51 to 
60 in., 58.50; 61 to 70m., 59.50, Toronto, 
Hamilton and London. Terms, 4 months 
or 3 per cent. 30 days. 

OLD MATERIAL. 
The demand is light, and prices 
are steady throughout. We quote job- 



22 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



bers' prices as follows : Agricultural scrap, 
50c. per cwt. ; machinery cast, 50c. per 
cwt. ; stove cast, 45c; No. 1 wrought 
40c. per 100 lb.; new light scrap copper, 
12c. per lb. ; bottoms, lie; heavy cop- 
per, I2^c. ; coil wire scrap, \%%c. • 
light brass, 7c; heavy yellow brass, 10c; 
heavy red brass, io^c. ; scrap lead, 2^c ; 
zinc, 2C ; scrap rubber, 6j^c. ; good 
country mixed rags, 6510 75c; clean dry 
bones, 40 to 50c. per 100 lb. 

HIDES, SKINS AND WOOL. 

Hides — Owing to the steady advance in 
values in the United States, the market 
here has risen steadily for three weeks. An 
advance of j£c. this week makes a total 
advance of ij^c in three weeks. We quote: 
Cowhides, No. 1, 8c; No. 2, 7c. ; No. 3, 
6c. Steerhides are worth ic. more. Cured 
hides are quoted at 8}4 to 9c. 

Skins — There is a steady trade, but 
no change in quotations. We quote 
as follows: No. 1 veal, 8-lb. and up, 
9c. per lb.; No. 2, 8c; dekins, from 55 to 
60c; culls, 20 to 25c ; sheepskins, 90c 
to $1. 

Wool — The market is steadier. We 
quote: Combing fleece, washed, 13c, and 
unwashed, 8c 

COAL. 

There is a steady sale and prices are 
firm. We quote as follows at interna- 
tional bridges : Grate, $4.75 per gross ton ; 
egg, stove and nut, #5 per gross ton with a 
rebate of 20c off for July shipments. 
PETROLEUM. 

The demand is slight, but no change is 
noted in prices. We quote : Pratt' s Astral, 
16 to i6j£c. in bulk (barrels, $1 extra) ; 
American water white, i6j£ to 17c. in 
barrels; Photogene, 15^ to 16c. ; Sarnia 
water white, 15 to I5>£c in barrels; Sarnia 
prime white, 14 to 14^ c in barrels. 



MARKET NOTES. 

Bright coke plates are 25c and terne 
plates 50c per box dearer. 

The larger sizes of black iron pipe, from 
2^ in. upward, are quoted higher. 

Nuts in 50 lb. lots are %c. per lb. extra, 
and in less than 50 lb. lots y£c. per lb. 
extra. 



TO CLEAN RUSTED IRONWORK. 

An ingenious method of cleaning rusted 
iron work is suggested in an English ex- 
change, which is specially applicable to 
articles which cannot be filed or ground, 
or which have recessed parts difficult to get 
at. The process has the merit of sim- 
plicity. Attach a piece of ordinary zinc to 
the ironwork, then immerse the whole into 
water in which is a little sulphuric acid. 
Let them remain for several days, when the 
rust will probably have disappeared. If, 
however, the article is badly rusted, a little 
more acid may have to be added. It is 
necessary that the iron and zinc be in good 
electrical contact, bound together with wire, 
or it will answer if a piece of battery zinc is 
connected up to the iron with a piece of iron 



wire tightly wound round. If the rust is 
only supetficial, it will suffice if a piece of 
galvanized iron is wound round the article, 
the galvanized surface, being zinc, proving 
sufficient for the purpose. The iron is not 
attacked by the acid while the zinc is in 
proper contact. The article will come out 
a grayish black color, and should then be 
washed and oiled. 



NOW FOR SPORTING GOODS. 

LEWIS BROS. & CO., Montreal, are 
making careful and extensive pre- 
parations to do a big business in 
sporting goods of all kinds during the com- 
ing season. Among other goods, they have 
just received from English and German 
manufacturers what they believe to be the 
largest shipment of guns ever imported by 
an individual Canadian house, comprising 
everything from the old muzzle-loader to 
the finest and most modern breach-loading, 
hammerless gun made. The importations 
of Lee Enfield and Lee-Metford rifles have 
been particularly heavy, as they are the 
sole agents for Canada, but their goods also 
comprise products of The Savage Arms Co. 
and The Winchester Repeating Arms Co., 
as well as Marlin rifles, Mauser pistols, 
Iver Johnston's and Smith & Wesson's 
revolvers. Another feature of their sporting 
goods department is S.S. smokeless powder, 
which cannot afford to be neglected, while 
on loaded shells they are prepared to give 
the trade special prices. The range of 
sporting accoutrements and clothing of all 
kinds is most complete. 

The season for these goods will be upon 
the trade in a few days, and the hardware- 
man should move at once if he would wish 
to have his stock in store and arranged in 
order before the demand sets in. A com- 
plete descriptive catalogue may be obtained 
on application. 



SYMPATHY FOR MR. CLARK. 

The many friends of Mr. H. H. Clark, 
who represents Lewis Bros, in the Eastern 
Townships of Quebec, will sympathize with 
him in the sad loss he sustained last Mon- 
day in the death of his wife at his home in 
Sherbrooke. The deceased had been ailing 
for some time. She was a native of Surrey, 
England. 

STEEL RAILS AND CEMENT. 

The Canada Hardware Co., Limited, 
Montreal, have been advertising and send- 
ing out circulars with the purpose of court- 
ing trade in old steel rails to be used for 
building bridges. It is said that a rail 
bridge can be erected at an inferior cost to 
one of wood and is much stronger, and 
more durable. If so hardware merchants 



Ihroughout the country ought to find 
opportunities to push this business. In the 
same breath The Canada Hardware Co. 
speak about cement, a line that merits some 
attention from hardwaremen. 



PRODUCTION OF PIG TIN. 

The world's approximate production of 
tin during the years named follows : 

Straits Nether- 
Settle- lands. Au-.tral- Com- 
ments. E. Indies, asia. wall. "Totals. 
Year. Tons. Tons. Tons. Tons. Tons! 

1890 32,400 11.280 9,600 9,600 55,100* 

1891 37,000 12,380 9,215 9,350 59,900 

1892 ... 39,500 12,200 8,740 9,270 73.310 

1893 45.800 12,310 7,770 8,840 78,670 

1894 52,200 22,280 8,315 8,330 85,700 

1895 53.400 13,640 8,130 6,650 87,380 

1896 53.4°° 16,980 7,180 4,840 87,380 

1897.... 46,000 14,920 6,590 4,450 77,720 

1898... 47,400 14,270 5,500 5,460 77,330 

1899J... 47,356 15,854 3,305 4,013 75,528 

1900J. .. 47,841 18,521 3,200 3,910 78,472 

including Bolivia, which produces about 
5,000 tons annually, and minor producing 
countries. 

Taking the average of the three years, 
1896 98, the percentage of tin contributed 
from the various sources approximated. 

{Shipments from the Straits to Europe 
and United States were 45,872 tons in 1899, 
46,041 tons in 1900. The shipments to 
India and China were : 1898, 2,551 tons ; 
1890, 1,484 tons ; 1900, 1,800 tons. 




We wish to dispose of the 
following Tinsmiths' Tools — all 
second hand : 

1 30 in. Tolls, 2 in. Diameter 

1 Large Stock, and Dies 

1 Peaning Machine 

1 Large Turner 

1 20 in. Tin Groover 

1 Dipper Handle Machine 

1 20 in. Tin Folder 



APPLY- 

THE GURNEY FOUNDRY CO., 



TORONTO 



Limited. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



23 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS, COM- 
fliOMISES. 

A MEETING of the creditors of A. 
J. Chuk & Son, dealers in agri- 
cultural implements, etc., Inger- 
soll, Out., was held on Wednesday. 

E. Soucv, genera] merchant, Rimouski, 
Que., has assigned. 

The sheriff is in possession of The Syd 
ney Hardware Co., Sydney, N.S. 

Charles Lebreton, general merchant. Tra- 
cadie, N.B., lias assigned to the sheriff. 
Joseph Morneau, sawmiller, Notre Dame 

Vdu Lac, Que., is offering 40c. on the dollar. 
The bailiff is in possession of the business 
of Shepherd iV Co., painters, etc., Ottawa. 

Albert Payne, coal and junk dealer, etc., 
Millbrook, Out., lias assigned to T. P>. 
Collins. 

G. Charette, genera] rchant, Ste. Marie 

de Blandford, Que., is offering to com 
promise. 

Geo. A. Tuck & Co., dealers in asbestos, 
etc., Montreal, have assigned to Kent iV 
Tmcotte. 

E. Forrest & Co., general merchants, Ste. 
Anne de Beaupre, Que., an' offering 30c. on 
the dollar. 

H. A. Damude, dealer in agricultural 
implements, St. Catharines, Ont., has 
assigned to C. A. Mallory. 

Venance Taillefer, general merchant, 
Uawkesbury, Ont., lias assigned to Alex. 
Desmarteau, and a meeting of his creditors 
has been held. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND 
DISSOLVED. 

Quintal iV Ethier, carriagemakers, Mont- 
real, have dissolved. 

Dupont & Lacroix, bicycle repairers, etc., 
Montreal, have dissolved. 

Co-partnership has been formed between 
Spencer & Dickson, general merchants, 
Glace Bay, N.S. 

Co-partnership has Keen registered between 
J. A. Vantassel and Wm. Webber, under the 
style of Vantassel & Webber, general mer- 
chants, Uigby, N.S. 

\oil (V Dagneau, wholesale and retail 
hardware dealers, Quebec, have dissolved, 
and .). M. Noel has registered as proprietor 
under the old style. 

The special partnership -of V. Hyde Baker 
and \ich. W.-McYittie, in The Logan Lum- 
ber Co., sawmillers, Rossland, B.C., has 
been made to expire on May 15, 1902. 

SALES MADE AND PENDING. 
N. C. Foster, painter, etc., Nanaimo, B. 

C, is offering to sell out. 

A. McNally, carriagemaker. Blyth, Ont., 
is advertising his business for sale. 

CHANGES. 

A. C. Annette, bicycle dealer, Morden. 
Man., has retired from business, 

The Western Elevator Co., Limited, Win- 
nipeg, Man., has been incorporated. 

A. Jennings has registered as proprietor 
of A. Jennings. & Co., wheelwrights. Mont- 
real. 

The Northrop Iron Works, Valleyfield, 
Que., have increased their capital stock to 
8200JMHI. 

F. G. Mummery, general merchant, Bar 
tonville, Ont., has been succeeded bv N. 
St. Clair. 

L. P. Christie, general merchant. Sydnej 
Mines, N.S., is about removing to Little 
<$ Bras d'Or. 

i The business of The Nova Scotia Steel 
Co., Limited, New Glasgow, N.S., has been 
transferred to the Nova Scotia Steel & 
Coal Co., Limited. 

The Fort Saskatchewan, N.W.T., Milling 



Co. (Leon Moret, proprietor), have sold 
Out to John N. Varty, who has leased the 
mill from August 1 to J. W. Shera. 

FIRES. 

James Dunlop, sawmiller. Sundridge, 
Ont., has been burned out. 
Win. Howe, bicycle dealer and gunsmith, 

Ottawa, has suffered loss l>\ fire ; partially 
insured. 

DEATHS. 

D. C. Gamblin. carriagemaker, Sussex. 
N.B., is dead. 



1879 



ESTABLISHED 



1879 



NOVA SCOTIA STEEL AND COAL CO. 

MR. GRABAIN FRASER, of The 
Nova Scotia Steel & Coal Com- 
pany, was in Toronto last week. 
" Hardware and Metal" managed to have 
a brief conversation with him immediately 
prior to his departure. " Business," he 
stated, " was still good, and the demand 
for steel is in excess of the supply. Most 
of the pig iron made by The Nova Scotia 
Steel & Coal Company is now nearly all 
used l>.\ itself foi burning into more finished 

product 5. " 

In addition to the coal properties which 
the company acquired some time ago and in 

which it is now using improved machinery, 
it expects to begin work on new properties, 
as well, shortly. 

The Nova Scotia Steel & Cual Company is 
the successor of The Nova Scotia Steel 
Company, the directors of the latter having 
become the directors of the former a few- 
weeks ago. The reorganization was agreed 
upon in October last, and is the outcome 
of the purchase of the coal lands purchased 
last year from the General Mining Associa 
tion. 

The shareholders of The Nova Scotia 
Steel Company receive in payment for their 
property $3,090,000 of common stock, and 
81,030,000 of 8 per cent, cumulative pre- 
fered stock in The Nova Scotia Steel & 
Coal Company. The latter is organized 
with a capital of 8o.000.000 of common 
stock in 3100 shares and 82,000,000 in 8 
per cent, cumulative preferred stock in 8100 
shares. Besides the stock there are to be 
first mortgage G per cent, gold bonds 
amounting to 82,500,000. After providing 
for the purchase of The Nova Scotia Steel 
Company's property there will remain in 
the treasury 81,910,000 of common stock and 
8970,000 of preferred stock. The new 
capital required, and which is to be pro- 
vided by the bond issue, is for redemption 
of The Nova Scotia Steel Company's tem- 
porary loan of 81,500,000 and for the de- 
velopment of the coal mines, erection of 
shipping pier, coke ovens, coal washing 
plant, furnaces, etc., 81 ,000,000. The pro- 
perties taken over are : 1, the coal areas at 
Sydney and Point Aconi ; 2, 7,824 acres of 
freehold land in Cape Breton ; 3, a freehold 
iron mine at Bell Island, and the company's 
iron claims in Nova Scotia ; 4, coal land 
leases near Trenton, N.S. ; 5, about 10 
miles of railway ;, 6, 160 acres of freehold 
land at Ferrona, N.S. ; 7, a blast furnace, 
coal washing and coking plant, built in 
1892, at Ferrona, the furnace having a 
capacity of 100 tons of pig iron per day ; 

8, about 150 acres of land at Trenton, on 
which are four steel melting furnaces, roll- 
ing mills, forges and other plant capable of 
tinning out 100 tons of finished steel a day; 

9, limestone and dolomite properties in 
Cape Breton County ; 10, cash book debts, 
stock in trade, which amounted to $635,- 
789.48 last January. 



Essex Handle and Wood 
Turning Works 

Late of Essex, now LEAMINGTON, ONT. 

Makers of Axe, Fork, Rake, Hoe, Sledge, Broom, 
Hammer and all kinds of Handles. Neck Yokes, 
Singletrees and Doub etree>, Bench Saws, Exercise 
Clubs, Baseball Bats, etc., etc. Do you sell any 
Shaved Pattern and Octagon Axe Handles? The 
largest and best trade in Canada does, because they 
give best satisfaction. All stock air-dried, not 
kiln-dried. If you are going to be in it, place your 
order with 

GARDNER BROS. & CO. 



CHAMPION FIRE and 
BURGLAR-PROOF . . 



SAFES 



ESTABLISHED HERE SIXTEEN YEARS. 

We sell direct to 
the user, and save 
all commissions. 

SIXTEEN SIZES 
IN STOCK. 

Our small Safe is 
the besUow-priced 
safe in the market. 

GET PRICES, ETC. 




BEFORE BUYING. 



S. S. KIMBALL, 

577 Craig Street, - Montreal- 

THE EDINBURGH ROPERIE & 
SAILCLOTH CO., LIMITED 

LEITH. SCOTLAND. 

Manufac turers of **~) 

Cordage of all kinds, Flax Sail- 
cloths, Tarpaulins and Water- 
Proof Cloths, Sewing Twines, 
Fishing Twines, Fishing Lines, 
Tying Twines, Etc., Etc. 

Represented by 



DAVID INCUS 



9 St. Peter St., 

MONTREAL 



Phone Main 4359. 



AXE HANDLES 

Very heavy stocks 

Thoroughly seasoned goods 

we make a Can ship promptly and 

specialty of . . . supply the very best 

" Hand Shaved " 

Octagon 
Axe Handles 



Made by 
Indians 



being the largest dealers in Canada in this line 

Can give exceptional value. 

Have 5,000 dozen of these handles 

on hand ready for polishing. 

Write for prices. 



Eastern Agmt— W. B. Murdock, Amherst, N.S. 
Western Agent — Jno. Burns, Jr., Vancouver, B.C. 
Montreal Agent — Alexander Gibb, 22 St. John St. 

W. C. CRAWFORD 

Tilbury, Ont. 



24 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HEATING 



AND 



PLUMBING 



VACUUM HEATING. 

Till', advantage of 'vacuum heating in 
connection with the low pressure 
heating plant, consists in the utiliza- 
tion of the difference in temperature between 
absolute and atmospheric pressure In the 
altitude of Chicago, water is vaporized at 
a temperature of 212 degrees Fahrenheit, 
under atmospheric pressure. While at ab- 
solute pressure the same is accomplished at 
'.is degrees Fahrenheit. The difference. 
which is 111 degrees' Fahrenheit, is avail- 
able for heating purposes under a vacuum 
of ; 1 1 Mini 30 inches. From 10 I" 25 inches 
of vacuum is readily attained in the o'rdin 
arv low pressure si cam heating plant, vary- 
ing accordingly as it is more or less tight. 
In a varying climate, this is of very ureal 

import e both in economy of fuel and 

time and ai tent ion. A banked fire is all 
that is necessary to maintain a uniform 
internal temperature of 70 degrees fully one- 
half the heating season, as shown by the 
following table, which gives the normal 
temperature (average temperature for 30 
years) of Chicago during the heating sea- 
son, from September 30 to May 1, as fol- 
lows : 



Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Jan. 


Fell. 


Mar. 


April 


5 2 go 


:;s.:, 


OQOgO 


23 8° 


211.1° 


:lt.2° 


lii.l f 



It. will be seen that by this the greatest 
average amount of heat to be furnished is 
1(1. '2 degrees in January, while the least 
average amount was that of April 13.5 
degrees, and the average amount for the 
seven months was 3:2.7 degrees. Naturalh 
there are extreme days when the artificial 
heat to be supplied to maintain a tempera 
ture of 70 degrees will reach 90 degrees, 
and it must also be apparent that the 
apparatus destined to furnish this great 
amount of heat, if without special means to 
meet all requirements, would greatly over- 
heat in a milder weather. 

The inventive genius of many heating 
experts has been taxed to gain this desired 
end. Automatic temperature controllers 

probably being the most efficient and im- 
portant up to this time, they have beyond 
,i reasonable doubt affected a great saving 
and added very much to the comfort 
afforded bj t he heat ing apparatus. 

The efficiency of the regulator has. how- 
ever, been materially reduced by the use 
of automatic air valves, which, when radi- 
ators were cooling (owing to the regulator 
having closed the dampers) permitted the 
air to enter the radiators, cooling them 
rapidly and necessarily increasing the opera- 
tions of the regulator. 

To illustrate the value of the vacuum 
valve, under such conditions, we cite an 
apparatus located in Chicago. The plant 

was installed twelve years ago, it consisted 

of twenty-nine cast iron radiators of stand- 
ard pattern and a cast iron boiler. Much 

of the radiation was indirect and the fuel 

used was gas. When the ordinarj auto- 
matic air valves were used, the operation of 
the regulator was from, two to six times an 
hour, according to the external temperature. 
When the vacuum valves were substituted 
f ] i he old valves, there was also put on 
mi the living room a gauge registering both 
pressure of vacuum as the case might be. 
The "regulator was one that controlled the 
gas burners under boiler by the tempera 
ture of the house, the thermostat being 



located in the main hall. There was the 
usual pilot light to ignite the gas when it 
was turned on. Observation was taken by 
the owner upon his arrival home at 5.30 
p.m., at which time the gauge registered 
2 I -'2 inches of vacuum. 

.The gauge was carefully observed during 
the entire evening, and at 10.30 p.m. regis- 
tered 25 inches of vacuum, when the tem- 
perature had fallen to 0* degrees, the Lias 
was turned on by action of the regulator 
and the temperature was again raised to 
7ti degrees. This operation required about 
twenty minutes. The owner retiring, no 
further observation was taken at this time. 
Since the application of the \al\es. Decem- 
ber 15, there has been no water put into 
the boiler up to the time of his writing, 
March 15, at which time the water gauge 
showed but I 1-2 inches lower than when 
the valves were put on, three months before. 
It would seem from this that we had failed 
to claim all the merit of the vacuum valve 
— D. F. Morgan in Plumbers' Trade 
Ji lurnal. 

BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED. 

Building permits have been issued in To- 
ronto to .John Kav. Sun & Co., for a SI 00(1 
addition to their six-storey warehouse at" 36 
King street west; to T. McComb. for two 
$2,000 residences near Arthur street, on 
Crawford street ; to The York Loan <fc 
Savings Co., for three $2,500 dwellings on 
Lucas street, near lioncesvalles avenue: to 
Maurice Rowland, for a pair of $3,000 
dwellings at 3.20 and 3,31 Delaware avenue : 
fco Mary W. Willson. for a $3,200 residence 
mi St. Clarence avenue, near College street 
to Jenkins & Hardy, for a pair of $3,200 
dwellings, near Sumach street, on Welles 
ley. 

The following building permits have been 
issued iii Ottawa.: .). Shearer, jr.. dwelling, 
5 Patterson avenue. $1,200; R. I.efair. 

double house, lot 18 NelS0n street. SI. Slltl ; 

Hon. C. Sil'ton. addition to dwelling, lot 
50. Cooper street, $5,000 : -1. & T. Gagnon, 

row of dwellings, lots D and E. Division 

street. $4,000; Thos. Ilastev. dwelling, lot 
I' 1 .. McLeod street. $],600; Daniel O'Connor, 
jr.. three shops and dwellings, lot 64, I 'am 
bridge street. $7,000: D. O'Connor, jr.. six 
veneered dwellings, lot 28 Catharine street, 
si. son ; dames Walker, two dwellings, lot 
12. Fourth avenue, $1,600 : D. Gagnon, 
double frame dwelling, lot 20. Henderson 
avenue, $1,500; Napoleon Boucher, shop and 
dwelling, lot 0. Catherine street. $5,000 : 
St. Patrick's Literarv and Scientific 
Societ.v Hall lot 07 Maria street. $13,500 
Joseph Derocher, brick veneered dwelling, 
lot 21. Chapel street. $1,000. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING 
CONTRACTS. 

Ptudy, Mansell & Co.. Toronto, have con 

tracts for remodelling the plumbing and 

heal inn in a house for Ceo. II. I lees, on 

St. George street, and for plumbing and 
gas-fitting in a house in East Toronto, for 
T. E. Lawless. 

The Bennett & Wright Co.. Limited. To 
ronto, have contracts for heating and 
plumbing in a house on Baldwin street, for 
Frank Cayley, and for the plumbing in the 
new building which The Canada Foundry 
Co., Limited, are erecting on Davenport, 
Road, Toronto. This latter job is a large 



and unique one— six buildings having to be 
furnished with plumbing. In tliree of these 
the fittings will be elaborate, there being 
in the three 50 closets, 58 washbasins, 20 
urinals and 10 showerbaths, and over 250 
lockers. || seems that there is a growing 
tendency in foundries to supply all the 
essentials for the cleanliness anil comfort of 
employes, and The Canada Foundry Coin 
pany. Limited, are putting in one of t |,, 
finest systems of the kind on the continent. 



SOME BUILDING NOTES. 

Win. Fechnaj will erect a brick residence 

in Dundas. 

There is talk of a new citv hall for St. 
John, N.B. 

Robt. Birney is building a new house at 
Elgin, Man. 

I!. McEwan is building a new house at 
Fleming, Man. 

Arthur Brown is erecting a house at 
Tompkins, Out. 

Geo. Johnston is erecting a new house at 
Fordvi ich, I hit . 

B. C. Beach & Co., foundrymen, Winches 
ter. Out., are erecting new premises. 

A. M McDonald, druggist, and Dr. 
Bruce, are erecting houses at Campbellton. 
N.B. 

II recti E a new $35,000 Government 

building at tin.' Ontario Model Farm, 
Guelph, Out., has been started. 

The Times Printing Co.. Moncton, N.B.. 
are asking for tenders before Julj 20, lor 
a brick building for their business. 

The first building of a new furniture 1,1. 

tory, at Lake Megantic, One., is nearing 
completion, and is readv lor the roof. 

Bowmanville, <*nt.. has passed by largi 
majorities by-laws to giant bonuses for tin 
erect ion of a fi mndrj and an evaporat oi 

A new public school will be erected at, 
Blind River, Out., this summer. T. A 
Craig is secretary of the Protestant School 
Board. 

Gregg & Gregg, architects. Toronto, have 
prepared plans for a new church at Dun 
dalk. Out. Building tenders are asked for 
before August 20. 

Colborne <fc Ormerod, the former pro- 
prietors of I he Clifton House. Niagara 
Falls, Out., which was destroyed by fire 
three years ago, tire thinking of rebuilding 
it. 

The A. B. Maybee Woodworking Co., of 
North End, St. 'John. N.B.. tire building 
a pretty summer home at Woodman's Point 
Westfield, N.B., for Arthur Sorrell. ,,f Bo- 
ton. 

Kini le J . Yanier. architect . litis been 
awarded I he contract of drawing up the 

plans for the Polytechnic school to be built 

on St. Denis street, in connection with 

Laval University] Quebec. The building i.i 
to cost between $75,000 and $100,000. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING NOTES- 

R. J. McCullough, plumber. Rat Portage, 

On!., has sold out to A. T. Fife & < !o 

The bailiff's sale of the stock, etc.. of J. 
F. Foster, plumber, etc., Hamilton, Out . 
is advertised. p- 

The Tor. .nto Plumbers' Union intend hold 
ing thir annual picnic at Mohawk Park. 
Brantford, to-day (Saturday). A big pro- 
gramme of sports and games has been pro- 
vided. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



25 




CANADIAN ADVERTISING is best done by THE 
E. DESBARATS ADVERTISING AGENCY 
Montreal. 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 

13 St. John Street, Montreal 

Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishing to be represented in Canada. 

Will Hold Dp a Sbelf ! 

That's what a shelf bracket is for. 
For this purpose there can be 

NOTHING BETTER 
NOTHING CHEAPER 

tlmn the .... 

BRADLEY STEEL HELP BRACKET 

It is well Japanned, Strong and Light. 

'J he Paving in freight u a good profit, aside 
from the lower price at which the goods are sold. 
BSP Order director through your jobber. 

ATLAS MFG. CO., New Haven, Conn.. U.S. A 

LOW TANK 
WATER CLOSET 
COMBINATIONS 
THE MOST PER- 
FECT ON THE 
MARKET 
NOISELESS IN 
ACTION 
BEAUTIFUL 
DESIGNS. 

Write for Catalogue. 

: The James Morrison 
^ Brass Mfg. Co. 

Limited 

TORONTO, ONT. 




SUCCESS 
IN 

BARN 
PAINT 



A Barn paint should be made right just as well 
as a House paint. We make paint for every- 
thing that requires paint. A farmer's barn, 
his fences, out houses, need paint as well as 
his house, but he doesen't think it's necessary 
to put our high grade house paints on the dry 
beards. of a barn, and it isn't. 

RAMSAY 
OUTSIDE PAINTS 

are made to go on Barns, fences, bridges, 
roofs, and all out buildings. There's a good 
profit in it at a dollar a gallon and the farmer 
will be mighty pleased when he sees how his 
buildings look painted at that price, and better 
pleased later when he sees how they are pre- 
served. Now is the time for the farmers' 
paint. 9 colors. 




A. Ramsay & Son 

PAINTMAKERS, 



Est'd 1842. 



MONTREAL. 



ONTARIO SILVER CO., 



Limited, 



NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA. 

u»«„fc,*„ M „ „f FLATWARE, CUTLERY • 

Manufacturers of ELECTRO P-LATE. . . 

Ask for our Catalogue and Quotations. 



ONTARIO 

NUTWORK 

PARIS 

ONT. 



Ontario Nut Works, Paris 

BROWN & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

All sizes of Hot Pressed 
Nuts, Square and Hexagon. 



NEW PROCESS TWIST DRILLS 

These Drills are Hot-Forged. The best part of the steel is not cut out 

and thrown away. 




They are tougher, stronger and better than is possible to attain by milling. 

Accurate, Durable, 

— AND — 

Highly Finished. 

These Drills are guaranteed to be as represented, and we will replace free of 
charge any tool found defective in material or workmanship. 




DISCOUNT SHEETS MAILED ON APPLICATION. 



Canadian Sales Agents. 



The FAIRBANKS COMPANY 



~7*t-& Craig Street 



MONTREAL. 



26 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MUNICIPAL RAILWAYS IN EUROPE. 

Report by R. Guenther, U.S. Consul-General at Frankfort. 



DR. A. VON DEK LEYE'N, a rail- 
road expert, has published an 
article in the June number of The 
German Review concerning the management 
of the Government railroads of Prussia. 

He demonstrates that the example of 
Prussia in buying the private railroads and 
running them on Government account has 
contributed to popularize this system in 
other countries, and states that not only 
have the other German states followed it, 
but that almost all the other European 
countries have purchased the existing rail- 
roads. 

The Austrian Government railroad net has 
to-day a mileage of almost 6,300 miles ; 
that of Hungary, about 8,150 miles. Since 
1882, a great change has taken place in 
Russia ; of the then existing 14,000 miles of 
railroad, only about 4(1 miles were owned 
by the Government. The total mileage in 
1897 was about 21.300 miles, of which 15,- 
780 miles belonged to the Government. To 
this must be added the Government rail- 
roads in Finland and Asiatic Russia, the 
Trans-Caspian anil the Siberian railroads. 

The Servian, Roumanian, and Bulgarian 
railroads are owned exclusively by the respec- 
tive Governments. 

Of the northern European kingdoms, Den- 
mark has a Government railroad system of 
1,107 miles and 525 miles of private rail- 
roads. 

Norway's railroads belong almost exclu- 
sively to the Government. 

Sweden has 2,303 miles of Government 
and 4,387 miles of private railroads. The 
Government has not yet succeeded in acquir- 
ing the latter, although efforts have been 
made to do so. 

Belgium, in L898, through the purchase 
of the Grand Central Beige and some minor 
private roads, became the possessor of the 
whole Belgian railroad system. 

Holland acquired all the remaining pri- 
vate railroads in 1890 ; they are, however, 
operated by two private companies. 

The Italian Government purchased all pri- 
vate main railroads of Italy in 1885 and 
leased them for 20 years to private corpo- 
rations. Dr. Von der Leyen states that 
both the last countries have had unpleasant 
experiences with this arrangement. 

Switzerland, after long discussion, resolved 
by federal law in October, 1897, to gradu- 
ally purchase all the private railroads. On 
January 1, 1901, the first federal railroads 
were operated by the Government. 

By agreements of 1883, the six large 
French private railroads had their rights 
recognized by the Government, and no 
change has been made in the policy in that 
country. The relatively small Government 
railroad system, located between the Orleans 
and the Western railroads, has remained 
intact. As the private railroads, however, 
have received large subsidies from the < lov- 
ernment, and as they will revert to the 
State in the second half of the present cen- 
tury, they can hardly be considered purely 
private railroads. 

Of the countries which have a private rail- 
road system exclusively, only England and 
the United States remain, and the writer 
remarks that it would not seem that this 
condition will soon be changed. He adds 
that it would be difficult to prove that the 
railroads of these two countries show more 
efficiency than the continental ones. To an 



American travelling in Europe, however, it 

is apparent that as far as comfort and con- 
venience arc concerned, the American rail- 
roads are far in the lead, and the English 
come next. 



THE BRITISH IRON TRADE. 

(From Tbe-Jrondori Times). 

WE lia\e received from the secretary, 
Mr.' J. S. Jeans, of The British 
Iron Trade Association a copy of 
the •' Annual Statistical Report on the 
Home and Foreign iron and Allied Indus- 
tides " for the year 1900, published for the 
information of the members. The present 
issue is the more interesting 1 and valuable 
because, as Mr. Jeans points out, the past 
year was in many ways remarkable. For 
instance, prices reached a higher level than 
they had attained in any other since 1874, 
the United States surpassed Great Britain 
as a producer of open-hearth steel, and a 
great increase in the American output of 
basic open-hearth steel was recorded. The 
previous report of the association for 1899 
dealt only with nine foreign producing 
countries, whereas the present report covers 
the iron and steel industries of eleven ; 
moreover, the iron and steel industries of 
the British colonies and dependencies, 
including India, are now recognized as 
important factors, and a section devoted to 
the statistics of such production, included 
in the report for the first time, is likelj to 
be a permanent feature, considering the 
rate at which the iron-making resources of 
the colonies, and especially of Canada, are 
being developed. There is, indeed, good 
reason to believe that the closing year of 
the nineteenth century will mark something 
in the nature of an epoch in metallurgical 
industry. The vast extension of mechanical 
appliances in all quarters of the globe and 
of means of communication b\ sea and by 
land, all dependent on iron and steel as 
material for their construction, to say noth- 
ing of the increased use of iron and steel 
for buildings of all kinds, has undoubtedly 
increased a great further opening up of 
productive resources, which are likely to be 
all required, not merely for further indus- 
trial developments, but for the mere renewal 
of existing constructions and plant. 

Last year was characterized by great 
extremes of elation and depression as 
regards iron and steel, not merely in Great 
Britain and on the Continent, but also in 
the United States, a general shrinkage of 
prices and output towards the end of the 
year following the phenomenal advances in 
the case of both raw and manufactured 
iron. The reaction is probably coiTectly 
attributed to a feeling that the pace had 
been too rapid, and that in view of the 
increases in productive plant, noticeably in 
Germany, Russia and the United States. 
prices were dangerously high. Preparations 
for increased smelting capacity in Italy. 
Austria-Hungary and Belgium, and a pro- 
spect of the Canadian output being raised 
from less than a hundred thousand to nearly 
a million tons a year, accentuated the 
alarm. Anxiety as to the supply of raw 
materials, fuel and ore diminished during 
the latter half of the year, arrangements 
being made in Spain, Sweden, Greece, Nor- 
way and Newfoundland to make larger sup- 
plies available. Considering all tilings the 
production of pig iron last' year does not 
show so considerable an increase as might 
have been supposed. Mr. Jeans gives the 



following table of the output in the prin- 
cipal countries in each of the last two 
years : 

l899.Tons. 1900.T011S. 

United Kingdom 9.305,319 8,908,570 

United States 13.620.703 13,789242 

£ erma "y 8.H7.594 8.494.852 

France o c -tS ^7 „ 2 

Russia 2 '|7 8,401 2,699.494 

o,. la 2664,000 2,821,000 

Be, S lum - 1,024 .576 1,018,507 

Total 37.310,593 37.731.665 

'I he output of steel last year was gener- 
ally, but not greatly, in excess of the 
figures for 1899. In the United Kingdom 
the increase was limited to open-hearth 
steel, the Bessemer description showing a« 
decline. The make pf open-hearth steel 
ingots was 3,156,050 tons, and of Bessemer 
1.715,001 tons, the total by both processes 
being 1.901,054 tons, as against 1,855,325 
tons in 1899. The Bessemer process seems 
to have been losing ground to the rival pro- 
cess latterly. 

As regards our overseas trade, we import- 
ed last year considerably more iron and 
steel than in any previous year, while our 
exports fell off as compared 'with 1899. The 
same feature was observable in the iron and 
steel trade of both Germany and Belgium. 
On the other hand the United States ex- 
ports show a more pronounced expansion 
than in any previous year. From America 
we received 1,151,108 tons of iron and steel 
of all kinds, and sent thither only 209,066 
tons. The interest, or even anxiety, ex- 
cited by this divergence has been increased 
by the combination of American steel works. 
Mr. Jeans points out, however, that the 
American Steel Corporation is far from being 
a monopoly . It is admitted, nevertheless, that 
the ultimate effect of the consolidation move- 
ment is one of the problems of the day. 
Meanwhile, notwithstanding the decrease in 
volume, the declared value of our exports of 
iron and steel was last year about £4,000.- 
000 in excess of the 1899 value, neailv 
£ 10,000,000 in excess of that of 1898, and 
about .£12.500,000 in excess of the value of 
1895. The aggregate increase in the value 
of our iron and steel exports for the five 
years since 1895 is about £23,000,000. Mr. 
Jeans does not seem to take a pessimistic 
view of our position, notwithstanding many 
alarmist newspaper articles and platform 
speeches. He points out that the increased 
imports imply an increased demand for 
materials for working up into higher forms, 
and that, presumably, there was an advan- 
tage in importing such materials last year, 
owing to their relative cheapness. Pig iron 
is the raw material of the steel industry : 
blooms, bars and billets are raw or semi- 
raw material for the tinplate. wire, hoop, 
sheet and other branches, and bar iron is. 
to some extent, a material for the crucible 
steel manufacture. Such imports at least 
suggest that extra activity in our own 
engineering works made them necessary. 
With reference to the recent very general 
tendency to exalt the competitive power of 
foreign iron industries at the expense of 
British industry of the kind. Mr. Jeans 
calls attention to the fact that the produc- 
tion of pig iron and steel in Great Britain 
last year was almost a record, falling only 
slightly below the out-turn for 1899 ; more- 
over, our exports of iron and steel were the 
greatest in declared value since 1873. Had 
the average prices last year been equal to 
those of 1873, the aggregate value for 1900 
would have been much greater than fori 
1873. • 



Oscar Campbell, general merchant. Upper 
Magaguadavix, N.B., has been succeeded by 
Wm. Wilson. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



27 



PORTLAND 
CEMENTS 

Best German. Belgian and 
English Brands. 

Fire Bricks, Fire Clay, 
Flue Linings, 
Drain Pipes, 
^Calcined Plaster, 
Granite Hard Wall Plaster, 
Wheelbarrows, 
Mortar Stains. 

A full stock of Builders' and Contractors' 
Supplies. Write for Quotations. 



W. ricNally & Co., 

MONTREAL. 



DAVID PHILIP 

MANUFACTURERS' AGENT 

362K Main St., - WINNIPEG. 

Correspondence invited from manufacturers of Staple or 
Heavy Hardware, Iron or Steel Bolts and Nuts, etc., 
either by carrying stock in Winnipeg or by selling direct 
from factory, 

GOOD REFERENCES. 



Special list of low-priced Japanned 
and Regalvanize d Wire Cloth. 

o 

24, > 30, 36 in. wire, in 50 ft. rolls. 

SAMPLES SENT WHEN DESIRED. WRITE FOR PRICES. 



The B. GREENING WIRE CO., Limited 

Hamilton, Ont., and Montreal, Que. 



STOVE PIPE THIMBLE. 




This is our Improved 
Fire Proof, Asbestos- 
Lined, Stovepipe 
Thimble, for floors 
which extend from 8 to 
16 inches; also showing 
Register placed in 
thimble after removing 
pipe, for covering up 
hole or ventilating 
room, opened or closed 
as desired. Write us 
for catalogue showing 
full line of these goods 
and our other hardware 
specialties. 



THE COLLINS MFG. CO., 



34 Adelaide Street West 



TORONTO 



The Robin Hood 
Powder Company 

If you want the best Trap or Game load in 
the world, buy " Robin Hood Smokeless," 
in " Robin Hood" Shells. It is quick, safe, 
and reliable. Try it for pattern and pene- 
tration from forty to seventy yards against 
any powder on the market. We make the 
powder, we make the shells, and we load 
them. Write for our booklet, " Powder 
Facts." 

The Robin Hood Powder 
Company _ 

SWANTON, VT. 



'&•&■&&*' %&i , 



-.&£*.'£* 




Here 
is 



AP 



OINTER 






If in doubt as to where you 

can obtain the Best Grades 
of 



Farm flACHiNERY Oils 

Write us. We have the only kind that makes the 

wheels go round. 



Jarvis and Esplanade Streets. 




28 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MANITOBA MARKETS. 

Winnipeg, July 15, iyoi. 

HARDWARE AND RAINTS. OILS 
AND GLASS. 

THE market is active and trade good 
in all lines. An advance in sleigh- 
shoe steel and a drop in zinc prices 
are the features of this market. There is 
considerable complaint that orders for barb 
wire are behind. In binder twine, there 
has been no change, and just at present not 
much movement. It is generally under- 
stood that, in spite of the heavy crop, there 
will be sufficient for all requirements. 

Crop conditions continue almost ideal, 
the heavy rains having been succeeded by 
hot days with occasional thunderstorms. 
Already many inquiries are coming in for 
harvest hands. Money is easier, although 
rates of interest are not lowered. 

In paints and oils, there is very little 
doing. Linseed shows increased strength, 
but quotations remain unchanged. 

Quotations for the week are as follows : 

Barhed wire, 100 lb S3 45 

Plain twist 3 45 

Staples 3 95 

Oiled annealed wire 10 3 95 

n 4 00 

12 4 05 

13 4 20 

14 4 35 

15 4 45 
Wire nails, 30 to 60 dy, keg 3 50 

" 16 and 20 360 

10 3 60 

8 3 7° 

6 3 75 

4 3 9° 

3 4 15 

Cut nails, 30 to 60 dy 3 10 

20 to 40 3 15 

" 10 to 16 320 

8 325 

6 3 30 

4 3 4° 

3 3 75 

Horsenails, 45 per cent, discount. 

Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No 1 4 65 

No. 2 and larger 4 40 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 4 9° 

No. 2 and larger 440 

Steel, No. o to No. 1 495 

No. 2 and larger 4 70 

Bar iron, $2.50 basis. 
Swedish iron, $5.00 basis. 

Sleigh shoe steel 3 25 

Spring steel 3 25 

Machinery steel 3 75 

Tool steel, Black Diamond, 100 lb 8 50 

Jessop 13 00 

Sheet iron, black, 10 to 20 gauge, 100 lb. 3 50 

20 to 26 gauge 3 75 

28 gauge 4 00 

Galvanized American, 16 gauge. . . 2 54 

18 to 22 gauge 4 50 

24 gauge 4 75 

26 gauge S 00 

28gauge 5 25 

Genuine Russian, lb 12 

Imitation " " 8 

Tinned, 24 gauge, 100 lb 7 75 

26 gauge 8 00 

28 gauge 8 50 

Tinplate, IC charcoal, 20 x 28, box 10 75 

IX " 1275 

IXX " 1475 

Ingot tin 33 

Canada plate, 18 x 21 and 18x24 3 25 

Sheet zinc, cask lots, 100 lb 7 co 

Broken lots 7 50 

Pig lead, 100 lb 6 00 

Wrought pipe, black up to 2 inch ... .50 an 10 p.c. 

" Over 2 inch 50 p.c. 

Rope, sisal, 7-16 and larger gn 00 

tt n 5° 

. " }i and 5-16 1200 

Manila, 7-16 and larger 14 00 

% 14 5° 

" H and 5-16 1500 



Solder 20 

Cotton Rope, all sizes, lb 17 

Axes, chopping $ 7 50 to 12 00 

" double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 

Screws, flat head, iron, bright 87 X 

Round " " 82H 

Flat ' ' brass 80 

Round " "' 75 

Coach 57 Ji p.c. 

Bolts, carriage 55 p.c. 

Machine 55 p.c. 

Tire 60 p.c 

Sleigh shoe 65 p.c. 

Plough 40 p.c. 

Rivets, iron 50 p.c. 

Copper, No. 8 35 

Spades and shovels 40 p.c. 

Harvest tools 50, and 10 p.c. 

Axe handles, turned, s. g. hickory, doz.. $2 50 

No. 1 1 50 

No. 2 1 25 

Octagon extra 175 

No. 1 1 25 

Files common 70, and 10 p.c. 

Diamond 60 

Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 50 p.c. 

Dominion, C.F., pistol 30 p.c. 

military 15 p.c. 

American R.F 30 p.c. 

C.F. pistol 5 p c. 

C.F. military 10 p.c. advance. 

Loaded shells : 

Eley's soft, 12 gauge black 16 50 

chilled, 12 guage 18 00 

soft, 10 guage 21 00 

chilled, 10 guage 23 00 

Shot, Ordinary, per 100 lb 6 25 

Chilled 6 75 

Powder, F. F. , keg 4 75 

F.F.G 5 00 

Tinware, pressed, retinned 75 and 2% p.c. 

" plain 70 and 15 p.c. 

Graniteware, according to quality 50 p.c. 

PETROLEUM. 

Water white American 2$ l Ac. 

Prime white American 24c. 

Water white Canadian 22c. 

Prime white Canadian 21c. 

PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS 

Turpentine, pure, in barrels $ 61 

Less than barrel lots 66 

Linseed oil, raw 92 

Boiled 95 



Lubricating oils, Eldorado castor 25 % 

Eldorado engine 24K 

Atlantic red 27 l A 

Renown engine 41 

Black oil 23K to 25 

Cylinder oil (according to grade) . . 55 to 74 

Harness oil 61 

Neatsfoot oil $ 1 00 

Steam refined oil 85 

Sperm oil 1 50 

Castor oil per lb. 11 % 

Glass, single glass, first break, 16 to 25 

united inches 2 25 

26 to 40 per 50 ft. 2 50 

41*050 " 100 ft. 550 

5ito6o 600 

61 to 70 per 100-ft. boxes 6 50 

Putty, in bladders, barrel lots per lb. 2% 

kegs '• 2% 

White lead, pure per cwt. 7 00^ 

No 1 " 671* 

Prepared paints, pure liquid colors, ac- 
cording to shade and color, per gal. $1.30 to $1.90 



INQUIRIES AND ANSWERS 

GASOLINE ENGINES WANTED 

A subscriber, Innisfal, Man., writes : 

Please give me the addresses of a few manufac- 
turers or agents in Canada of gasoline or hot air 
engines of one or two horse-power. 

Answer : Manufacturers of gasoline en- 
gines are : The Goldie & McCulloch Co., 
Limited, Gait, Ont. ; Northey Co., Limited, 
Toronto ; McLachlan Electric & Gasoline 
Motor Co., Limited, Toronto, Ont. ; John 
Gillies Estate Co., Limited, Carleton Place, 
Ont.; Gasoline Engine Co., Limited, Toron- 
to Junction ; Reid Gisoline Engine Co., 
Limited, Hamilton, Ont.; Smart-Eby Co., 
Limited, Hamilton, Ont.; Hamilton Model 
Works, Hamilton, Ont. 



T. Marion, general merchant, Quesnelk 
B.C., lias retired from business. 



American Sheet Steel Company 

Battery Park Building 
New York 

Manufacturers of all varieties of 

Iron and Steel Sheets 
Black and Galvanized 
Plain and Painted 
Flat, Corrugated and 
"V" Crimped 

Apollo Best Bloom Galvanized 
W. Dewees Wood Company's 

Patent Planished Iron 
W. Dewees Wood Company's 

Refined Smooth Sheets 
Wellsville Polished Steel Sheets 

Representatives for Canada 
B. & S. H. Thompon & Company 
26 St. Sulpice Street 
Montreal 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



29 



.< 



MIDLAND 



JJ 



BRAND 



Foundry Pig Iron. 



Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as fuel, "Mid- 
land" will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



f> 



Write for Prices to Sales Agents: 

rummond, McCall & Co. 

or to MONTREAL, QUE. 



Canada Iron Furnace Co. 



MIDLAND, ONT. 



Limited 



"The Peerless" 



is the best Bolster Spring ever 
produced. A fine line for the 

hardware trade. Wr ite Us For Prices, 




James Warnock & Co. 



Gait, Ont. 



CUKKENT JVIAKKET QUOTATIONS 



July 19, 1901. 
These prices are for such qualities and 
quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 
Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list as the desire 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

Tin. 

Lamb and Flag and Straits— 

56 and 28 lb. ingots, per lb. 31% 32 

Tinplates. 

Charcoal Plates— Bright 

M.L.8., equal to Bradley. P. r box 

I.O., usual sizes J6 SO 

I.X., " 8 00 

I.X.X., " 9 50 

Famous— 

1.0 6 50 

I.X 8 00 

I.X.X 9 50 

Raven 4 Vulture Grades— 

I.O., usual sizes 4 50 

I.X., " 5 25 

I.X.X " 6 OJ 

LXXX., " 6 75 

D.O.,12%xl7 < 00 

D.X 475 

D.X.X 5 00 

Coke Plates— Bright 
Bessemer Steel— 

I.O. , usual sizes 4(0 

I.C., special sizes, base 4 25 

20x28 - 8 25 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 
Dean or J. G. Grade— 

I.C., 20x28, 112 sheets 8 50 

I.X. , Terne Tin 10 50 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 

Cookley Grade— Per lb. 
X X., 14x56, 50sheet bis) 

'• 14x60, " > .... 0C6V, 

•' 14x65, " ) 

Tinned Sheets 

72x30 up to 24 gauge 07% 

•' 26 " 08 

" 28 " 08J4 

Iron and Steel. 

Common Bar, per 100 lbs.... 185 190 

Refined " " 2 35 

Horse Shoe Iron ' 2 35 

Hoop steel, 1% to 3 in. base, 

extras for smaller sizes 3 00 

Sleigh Shoe Steel " base — 2 10 

TlreSteel 2 30 2 50 

Reeled Machinery 3 00 

ToeCalkSteel 2 85 3 00 

T Firth & Co's tool steel.per lb 12% 13 

Jessops tool Steel 12% 13 

Morton's tool steel C 12V, 13 

Black Diamond and " B.C." 

tool steel 10 11 

Drill Steel, per lb (8 10 

Boiler Tabes. 

1%-inoh 12% 

2 " 13 

2% " 15 

J •• 16 

3% " 20 

4 " 25 

Steel Boiler Plate. 

Miooh 2 50 2 60 

^•■Jeinoh ... 260 270 

*0»inoh and thloker 2 50 2 60 

Black Sheets. 

Com. D.F1. 

18gauge 2 75 3 00 

20 gauge 2 75 3 CO 

22 to 24 " 2 75 3 25 

26 " 2 85 3 50 

28 " 3 00 



Canada Platee. 

All dull, 52 sheets 2 90 

Half polished 3 UO 

Allbright 3 .'0 

Iron Pipe. 
Black pipe — 

% " 4 65 

% inch 3 40 

% " 3 45 

% " 370 

% " 3 85 

1 " 5 40 

1% " 7 70 

1% " 9 to 

2 " It 50 

2% " 20 95 

3 " 24 ?5 

3% " 3i) 75 

4 " 39 00 

5 " 47 35 

6 " 62 Id 

Galvanized pipe — 

V, inch 5 15 

% " 5 50 

1 " 7 95 

1% " 10 80 

1% " 12 95 

2 " 17 35 

Galvanized Sheets. 

Queen's 
G C. Comet. Amer. Head. 
16 gauge ... 4 00 3 75 

18 to 24 gauge 4 00 3 85 4 25 4 00 
26 " 4 25 4 10 4 25 4 25 

28 " 4 50 4 35 4 40 4 50 

Case lots 10 to 15c. less. 
28 gauge American equals 26 gauge English. 

Chain. 

Proof Coil, 3-16 in., p*r 1001b 

% •• 8 90 8 50 

5-16 " " 4 70 5 00 

% " " 4 05 4 ro 

7-16 " " 3 90 4 V5 

" % " " 3 70 4 10 

9-16 " " 3 65 4 05 

% " " 3 35 3 90 

*£ " " 3 60 4 10 

Halter, kennel and post chains, 40 to 40 and 

5 p.o. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Tie-out chains 65 p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 45 p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, dis- 
count 35 p c. 
Jack chain, brass, single and double, die- 
count 40 p.c. 

Copper. 
Ingot 

English B. S., ton lots 17 3 4 

Lake Superior 

Bars. 
Cut lengths round, % to % in. 23 25 
• ' round and Bquare 

1 to 2 inches.... 23 25 
Sheet. 
Plain, 14 oz., and light, 16 

oz. , 14x48 and 14x60 24 14% 

Plain, 14 oz., and light, 16 

oz., irregular sizes 24% 25 

Tinned copper Bheets 26 

Planished 32 

Braziers (In sheets.) 

4x6ft. 25 to 30 lbs. ea., per lb 25 

" 35to45 " " .... 24 

50-lb. and above, " .... 23 
Boiler and T.K. Pitts 

Plain Tinned, per lb 28 

Spun, per lb 32 

Brass. 
Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge 10 per cent. 

Sheets, hard-rolled, 2x4 23 

Tubing, base, per t 23 

Zine Spelter 

Foreign, per lb 05% 06 

Domestio " 



Zinc Sheet. 

5 cwt. casks 00 6V„ 

Partcasks CO 6% 

Lead. 

Imported Pig, per lb 04% C4% 

Bar.llb 05% 05% 

Sheets, 2% lbs. sq. ft., by .... 06% 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lbs., " .... 06 

Note.— Cut sheets % cent per lb. extra. 
Pipe, by the roll, usual weights per yard, list s 
at 7c. per lb. and 30 p.c. dis. f.o.o. Toronto. 

Note.— Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 
8-1 i . lengths lists at 7% cents. 

Shot. 

Common, $6.50 per 100 lb. J chilled, $7.00 
per 100 lb. ; buck, seal and ball, $7.50. Dis- 
count, 17% p.c. Prices are f o.b. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Terms 3 per cent, cash, freights equalized. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings. 
Discount, 60 and 10 per cent, on medium and 
extra heavy, and 60 per cent, on light. 

Solder. Per lb. Per lb. 
Bar half-and-half, guarant'd .... 19% 

Bar half-and-half, commer'l 19 

Refined 18% 

Wiping 18 

Note.— Prices of this graded according to 
quantity. The prioes of other qualities of 
solder in the market indicated by private 
brands vary according to composition. 

Antimony. 

Cookson's, per lb 10% 11 

White Lead. Per 100 lb. 

Pure 6 37 

No. 1 do 1 6 00 

No.2do 5 62% 

No.3 do 5 55 

No.4do 4 87% 

Munro's Seleot Flake White 7 37% 

Elephant and Deoorators' Pure 7 12% 

Brandram's B B. Genuine 7 50 

" " Decorative 7 00 

" " No. 1 6 50 

" " No. 2 5 75 

Red Lead. 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt $5 50 

Genuine, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 5 75 

No. 1, 560 lb. caskB, per cwt 5 25 

No. 1, 1001b. kegs, per cwt 5 00 

White Zinc Paint. 

Elephant Snow White 08 09 

Pure White Zino 08 0(9 

No 1 06 07%. 

No! 2 .". 05 C6% 

Dry White Lead. 

Pure, caBks 5 75 

Pure, kegs 6 25 

No. l.casks 5 50 

No. 1, kegs 5 00 

Prepared Faints. 

In %, % and 1 gallon tins. 

Pure, per gallon 125 

Second qualities,per gallon 1 10 

Barn (inbbls.) 75 85 

The Sherwin-Williams Paints 1 45 

Canada Paint Co's Pure 125 

Toronto Lead & Color Go's Pure. ... 1 25 

Sanderson Pearcy's Pure 1 20 

Stewart & Wood's Champion Pure. 1 20 

Colors in Oil. 

25 lb. tins, Standard Quality. 

Venetian Red, per lb 05 

Chrome Yellow 11 

Golden Ochre 06 

French " 05 

MarineBlaok 09 

Green 09 

Chrome " 08 

French Imperial Green 09 



Colors, Dry. 

Yellow Oohre(J.O.) bbls.... 135 140 

Yellow Oohre J.F.L.S.), bbls ... 2 75 

Yellow Ochre (Royal) 110 115 

Brussels Ochre 3 00 

Venetian Red (best), per owt. 180 190 

Kngllsh Oxides, per owt 3 00 3 25 

American Oxides, per owt. .175 2 00 

Canadian Oxides, per owt.,.. 1 75 2 00 

Super MagnetloOxides, 93p.o. 2 00 2 25 

Burnt Sienna, pure, per lb 10 

" Umber, " " 10 

do Raw 09 

Drop Black, pure 09 

Chrome Yellows, pure 18 

Chrome Greens, pure, per lb 12 

Golden Oobre 03% 

Ultramarine Blue in 28-lb.. 

boxes, per lb 08 24 

Fire Proof Mineral, per 100 lb 100 

Genuine Eng.Litharge, per lb .... 07 

Mortar Color, per 100 lb 125 

English Vermillion 80 

Pure Indian Red, No. 45 lb 80 

Whiting, per 100 lb 55 

Bine Stone. 

Casks, for spraying, per b 07 

100-lb. lots, do. per lb 08 

Putty. 

Bulk in bbls 1 90 

Bulk in less quantity 2 05 

Bladders In bbls 3 10 

Bladders in kegs, boxes or loose. ... 2 25 

Bladders in 25-lb. tins 2 35 

Bladders in 12%-lb. tins 2 65 

Bladders in bu'k or tins less than 1001 b2 90 

Tarnishes. 

In 5-gal. lots.). Per gal. 

Carriage, No. 1 2 90 3 30 

body 800 900 

" rubbing 4 00 5 00 

Gold Size, Japan 3 00 3 40 

Brown Japan 2 40 2 80 

Elastic Oak 2 90 3 30 

Furniture, extra 2 40 2 80 

No.l 160 2 00 

Hard Oil Finish 2 70 3 10 

Light Oil Finish 3 20 3 60 

Demar 3 30 3 70 

Shellac, white 4 40 4 80 

" orange 4 00 4 40 

Furniture Brown Japan, 1 60 2 00 

Black Japan 2 40 2 80 

'• No. 1 1 60 2 00 

The Imperial Varnish & Color Co's., 
Limited Elastilite Varnish 1 gal. can, each. 
$3.00. 

Granitine Floor Finish per gal., $2.75. 

Maple Leaf Coach Enamels ; Size 1, $1 20 ; 
Size 2, 70c. ; Size 3, 4Jc. each. 

Castor Oil- 
East India, in cases, per lb. . 10 10% 
" small lots 10% 11 

Cod Oil, Etc. 

CodOilpergal 50 55 

PureOlive 120 

" Neatsfoot 90 

Glne. 

Common 08% 09 

French Medal 14 14% 

Cabinet sheet 12 13 

White.extra 18 20 

Gelatine 22 30 

Strip 18 20 

Coopers 19 20 

Huttner 18 



30 



CANADIAN HARDWARE ANiJ METAL 



STEEL, PEECH &TOZER,u*. 

Phoenix Special Steel Works. The Ickles, near Sheffield, England. 

Manufacturers of __ — -— flfli^^. 

Axles and Forgings of all descriptions, Billets and Spring 
Steel, Tyre, Sleigh Shoe and Machinery Steel. 



Sole Agents for Canada. 



JAMES HUTTON & CO., 



MONTREAL 



HARDWARE. 

Ain inanition. 

Cartridges. 

B B Cap Dom. 50 and 5 per cent. 

Rim Fire Pistol, die. 40 p. o., Amer. 

Rim Fire Cartridges, Dom., 50 and 5 p. o. 

Central Fire PiBtol and Rifle, lOp.o. Amer. 

Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes, Dom. 
30 per cent. 

Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dom., 15 and 5 per cent. 

Central Fire, Military and Sporting, Amer. 
add 5 p.c. to list. B.B. Caps, discount 40 
per cent. Amer. 

Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap and 
" Dominion " grades, 25 per cent. Rival 
and Nitro, 10 p.c advance on list. 

Brass Shot ShelU, 55 per cent. 

Primers, Dom., 30 per cent. 

Wads per lb- 

Best thick white felt wadding, in %-lb 

bates ■■•■•• * "" 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

%-lb. bags 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 35 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 8 gauge 55 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge 25 

Thin card wads in boxes of 1,000 
each, 8 gauge 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M. 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and 1C gauges 70 

7 and 8 gauges 90 

5 and 6 gauges 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white oloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 gauges 1 65 

5 and 6 gauges 1 90 

Adzes. 

Discount, 20 per cent. 

Anvils. 

Wright's. 80-lb. and over 10-14 

Hay Budden, 80-lb. and over .... 09<4 
Brook's, .... 11% 

Angers, 
Gilmour's, discount 65 and 5 p.c. off list. 

Axes. 
Chopping Axes 

Single bit, per doz 5 50 10 00 

Double bit, " 11 00 18 00 

Bench Axes, 40 p.c. 
Broad Axes, 33% per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boy's Axes 5 75 6 75 

Splitting Axes 6 50 12 00 

Handled Axes 7 00 10 00 

Axle Grease. 

Ordinary, per gross 5 75 6 00 

Bestquality 13 00 15 00 

Bath Tabs. 

Zinc .... 6 00 

Copper, discount 15 p.c. off revised list 

Baths. 

Standard Enameled. 

5%-inob rolled rim, 1st quality 25 00 

" 2nd " 21 00 

Antl-Frlctlon Metal. 

"Tandem" A per lb. 27 

B " 21 

C " 11% 

Magnolia Anti-Friction Metal, per lb. 25 
Frictionless metal, per lb 23 

srBAODSE SMELTING WORKS. 

Aluminum, genuine 45 

Dynamo 29 

Special 25 

Aluminum, 99 p.c. pure "Syracuse ".. 50 

Bells. 

Hand. 
Brass, 60 per cent. 
N ickel, 55 per cent. 



Cow. 
American make, discount 66% per cent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 
Door. 

Gongs, Sargant's 5 50 8 00 

" Peterboro', discount 45 per cent. 
Farm. 

American, each 125 3 00 

House. 

American, per lb 35 40 

Bellows. 

Hand, per doz 3 35 4 75 

Moulders', per doz 7 50 10 00 

Blacksmiths', discount 40 per cent. 

Belting. 
Extra, 60, 10 and 5 per cent. 
Standard, 70 per cent. 
No. 1, 70 and 10 p.c 

Bits. 
Auger. 
Gilmour's, discount 60 and 5 per cent. 
Rockford, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings' Gen., net list. 
Car. 
Gilmour's, 47% to 50 per cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Damond, Shell, per doz 100 150 

Nail and Spike, per cross.... 2 25 5 20 
Blind and Bed Staples. 

All sizes, per lb 07 3 4 12 

Bolts and Nuts. Percent. 

Carriage Bolts, full square, Norway 65 

" " full square 65 

Common Carriage Bolts, all sizes 60 

Machine Bolts, all sizes 60 

Coach Screws 70 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 72% 

Blank Bolts 60 

Bolt Ends 62% 

Plough Bolts 60 

Nuts, square 4 c. off 

Nuts, hexagon 4%c. off 

Tire Bolts 67% 

Stove Bolts 67% 

Stove rods, per lb. 5% to 6c. 

Boot Calks. 
Small and medium, ball, per M.... 4 25 

Small heel, per M 4 50 

Bright Wire Goods. 

Discount 6J% per cent. 

Broilers. 
Light, dis., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Reversible, dls., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Vegetable, per doz., dis. 37% per cent. 

Henis, No. 8, " 6 00 

Henis, No. 9, " 7 00 

Queen City " 7 50 00 

Batchers' C leavers. 

German, per doz 6 00 1100 

Amerioan, per doz 12 00 20 00 

Building Paper, Etc. 

Plain building, per roll 30 

Tarred lining, per roll 40 

Tarred roofing, per 100 lb 1 65 

Coal Tar, per barrel 3 50 

Pitch, per 100-lb 85 

Carpet felt, per ton 45 tO 

Bull Rings. 
Copper, $2.00 for 2% in. and $1.90 for 2 in. 

Butts. 
Wrought Brass, net revised ist 

Cast Iron. 
Loose Pin, dis., 60 per cent. 

Wrought Steel. 
Fast Joint, dis. 65, 10 and 2% per cont. 
Loose Pin, dis. 65, 10 and 2% per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, dis. 70, 70 and 5 per c nt. 

Gen. Bronzed, per pair 40 65 

Carpet Stretchers . 

Amerioan, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Billiards, per doz 6 50 .... 

Castors. 
Bed, new list, dis. 55 to 57% percent. 
Plate, dis. 52% to 57% per cent. 
Cattle Leaders. 

Nos. 31 and 32, per gross 50 9 50 

Cement. 

Canadian Portland 2 50 2 80 

English " 3 00 

Belgian " 2 50 2 75 

Canadian hydraulio 125 150 



Chalk. 

Carpenters Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump, per owt 60 65 

Red 05 06 

CrayoD, per gross 14 18 

Chisels. 
Socket, Framing and Firmer. 
Broad's, dis. 70 per cent. 
Warnock's, dis. 70 per cent. 
P. S. & W. Extra 60, 10 and 5 p.c. 

Churns. 
Revolving Churns, metal frames— No. 0, $8— 
No. 1, $8.50— No. 2, $9.00— No. 3, $10.00— 
No. 4, $12.00— No. 5, $16.00 each. Ditto, 
wood frames— 20c each less than above. 
Discounts : Delivered from factories, 58 
p.c. ; from stock in Montreal, 58 p.c. 
Terms, 4 months or 3 p.c. cash in 30 days. 
Clips. 
Axle dis. 65 per cent. 

OloBets 

Plain Ontario Syphon Jet $16 00 

Emb. Ontario Syphon Jet 17 00 

Fittings net 1 00 

Plain Teutonic Syphon Washout. ... 10 00 
Emb. Teutonic Syphon Washout .... 11 00 

Fittings net 1 25 

Low Down Teutonio, plain 16 00 

" " embossed 17 00 

Plain Richelieu net 3 75 

Emb. Richelieu net 4 00 

Fittings net 1 25 

Low Down Ont. Sy. Jet, plain net. . 19 50 
" " " •' " emb'd. net 20 50 

Closet connection net 1 25 

Basins, round, 14 in 1 00 

" oval, 17 x 14 in 2 50 

" " 19xl5in 3 75 

Discount 40 p.c, except on net figures. 
Compasses, Dividers, Kt<:. 
American, dis. 62% to 65 per cent. 

Cradles, Grain. 
Canadian, dis. 25 to 33% per cent. 
Crosscut Saw Handles. 

8.4D., No. 3, per pair 17% 

" 5, " 22% 

" 6. " 15 

...20 



Boynton pattern " 

Door Springs. 

Torrey's Rod, per doz (15 p.c.) 2 00 

Coil, perdoz 88 160 

English, per doz 2 00 4 00 

Draw Knives. 
Coach and Wagon, dis. 50 and 10 per cent. 
Carpenters, dis. 70 per cent. 
Drills. 
Hand and Breast. 
Millar's Falls, per doz. net list. 
DRILL BITS. 
Morse, dis., 37% to 40 per cent. 
Standard dis. 50 and 5 to 55 per cent 

Faucets. 
Common, cork-lined, dis. 35 per cent. 
ELBOWS. (Stovepipe.) 

No. l.per doz 1 40 

No. 2, perdoz 1 20 

Bright, 20c per doz. extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 
Discount, 45 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 
Iron, discount 40 per cent. 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 
Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 
FILES AND RASPS. 

Great Western , 75 and 5ptr cent. 

Disston 70 " 10 ■' 

Arcade 75 " 5 " 

Kearney 4 Foot 70 " 10 " 

American 75 " 5 " 

McCIellan 70 " 5 

Eagle 70 10 and 5 " 

Nicholson 70 " 10 

Heller 60 " 10 

Royal & Keystone 80 p.c aDd 80 and 10 p.c. 
Black Diamond, 60 to 60 and 10 per cent. 
Jowitt's, English list, 25 to 27% per cent. 

FORKS. 
Hay, manure, etc., dis., 50 and 10 per cent, 
revised list. 

GLASS— Window— Box Price. 

Star D. Diamond 

Size United Per Per Per Per 

Inches. 50 ft. 100 ft 50 ft. 100 ft 

Under26 2 15 4 15 .... 6 00 

26to40 2 30 4 45 .... 6 65 



41 to 50 4 85 .... 7 50 

51 to 60 5 15 .... 8 50 

61to70 5,50 .... 9 50 

71to80 6 00 .... 10 50 

81 to85 6 50 .... 11 70 

86to90 14 00 

91to95 15 50 

99tol00 18 00 

GAUGES 
Marking, Kjrtise, Etc. 
Stanley's dis. 50 to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 
Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33, each. . . 1 65 2 40 
HALTERS. 

Rope, % per gross 

" % " 900 

" %to% 14 00 

Leather, 1 in., per doz 3 87% 4 00 

" l%in., " 5 15 5 20 

Web,— perdoz 187 2 45 

HAMMERS. 
Nail 
Maydole's, dis. 5 to 10 per cent. Can. dis. 
25 to 27% per cent. 

Taok. 

Magnetic, per doz 110 120 

Sledge. 

Canadian, per lb ... 07% 08X 

Ball Pean. 
English and Can., per lb.... 22 25 
HANDLES. 

Axe.perdoz.net 150 2 00 

Store door, per doz 100 150 

Fork. 
C. & B., dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 

Hoe. 
C. & B., dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 
Saw. 

American, perdoz 100 125 

Plane. 

American, per gross 3 15 3 75 

Hammer and Hatchet. 
Canadian, 40 percent. 

Oross-Cut Saws. 

Canadian, per pair 13% 

HANGERS. doz. pairs. 

Steel barn door 5 85 6 00 

Stearns , 4 inch 5 00 

" 5 inch 6 50 

Lane's covered- 
No. 11, 5-ft. run 8 40 

No. 11%,10-ft.run 10 80 

No. 12, 10-ft.run 12 60 

No. 14, 15-ft. run 2100 

Lane's O.N.T. track, per foot. . . . 4% 

HARVEST TOOLS. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 
HATCHETS. 
Canadian, dis. 40 to 42% per cent. 

HINGES. 
Blind, Parker's, dis. 50 and 10 to 60 per cent. 

Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb 06% 

" " 5-in., " .... 06'4 

" " 6-in., " 06 

" " 8-in., " .... 05% 

" 10-in., " .... 05% 
Light T and strap, dis. 65 and 5 per cent. 
Screw hook and hinge — 

6 to 10 in., per 100 lbs 3 90 

12 in. up, per 100 lbs 3 00 

Per gro. pairs. 

Spring 12 00 

HOES. 
Garden, Mortar, etc., dis. 50 and 10 p.c 

Planter, per doz 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE 

Disoount. 45 and 5 per cent 

HOOKS. 
Cast Iron. 

Bird Cage, per doz 50 110 

Clothes Line, per doz 27 63 

Harness, per doz 72 88 ... 

Hat and Coat, per grpss 1 00 3 00 s * 

Chandelier, per doz 50 1 00r 

Wrought Iron. < 

Wrought Hooks and Staples, Can., dl«. 
47% per cent. 

Wire. 
Hat and Coat, disoount 45 per cent. 

Belt, per 1,000 60 

Screw, bright, dis. 55 per cent. 






CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



31 



* 



Uso Syracuse Babbitt Metal 



IT IS THE 
BEST MADE. 




For 
Paper and Pulp 
Mills,' Saw and 
Wood Working 
Machinery, Cotton 
and Silk Mills, 
Dynamos, Marine 
Engines, and all 
kinds of 
Machinery 
Bearings. 



Wire, Triangular and Bar Solder, Pig Tin, Lead, Ingot Copper, Ingot Brass, Antimony, Aluminum, Bismuth, Zinc Spelter, 
Phosphor Tin, Phosphor Bronze, INickle, etc., always in stock. 



17 * • (332 William St., MONTREAL, QUE. 

J-actories . j and SYRACUSE, N.Y. 



Syracuse Smelting Works 



HORSE NAILS 
"C'brand 50 and 7%D.c.off new li tl Oval- 
"M" brand 50, 10 and 5 per cent. J heart 
Countersunk 60 per rent, 

HORSESHOES 

F.O.B. Montreal. 
No. 2 No. 1. 
Iron Shoes. and and 

larger, smaller. 
Light, medium, and heavy. 3 50 3 75 

Snow shoes 3 75 4 00 

Steel Shoes. 

Light 3 60 3 85 

Featherweight (all sizes) 4 85 4 85 

F.O.B. Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Guelph, 10c. per keg additional. 

Toe weighc steel shoes 6 70 

JAPANNED WARE. 
Discount, 45 and 5 p c. off list, June 1899 
ICE PICKS. 

Star per doz 3 00 3 25 

KETTLES. 
Brass spun, 7% p.c. dis. off new list. 

Copper, per lb 30 50 

American, 60 and 10 to 65 and 5 p.c. 

KEYS. 
Lock, Can., dis., 45 p.c. 
Cabinet, trunk, and padlock, 

Am. per gross 60 

KNOBS. 
Door, japanned and N.P., per 

doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin, per doz 2 75 3 25 

Bronze Genuine, per doz 6 00 9 00 

Shutter, porcelain, F. 4 L. 

screw, per gross 1 30 4 00 

White door knobs— per doz. 1 25 

HAY KNIVES. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 

LAMP WICKS. 
Discount, 60 per cent. 

LANTERNS. 

Cold Blast, per doz. 7 Oj 

No. 3 "Wright's" 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner 4 00 

Dashboard, cold blast 9 00 

No. 5 75 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

Porcelain lined perdoz. 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized 187 3 85 

King, wood 2 75 2 90 

King, glass 4 00 4 50 

Allglass 120 130 

LINES. 

Pish, per gross 105 2 50 

Chalk " 1 90 7 40 

LOCKS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 

Russel 4 Erwin, per doz 3 00 3 25 

Cabinet. 
Eagle, dis. 30 p.c. 

Padlock 
English and Am., perdoz.... 50 6 00 
Scandinavian, " .... 1 00 2 40 

Eagle, dis. 20 to 25 p.c 

MACHINE SCREWS. Iron and Brass. 
Flat head discount 25 p.c 
Round Head discount 20 p.c. 
MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths' perdoz 1 25 1 50 

Carpenters', hickory, per doz 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Vitae, per doz 3 85 5 00 

Caulking each 60 2 00 

MATTOCKS. 

Canadian, perdoz 5 50 6 50 

MEAT CUTTERS. 
American, dis. 25 to 30 p.c. 
German, 15 per cent. 

MILK CAN TRIMMINGS. 
Discount, 25 percent. 

NAILS. 

Quotations are ; Cut. Wire. 

2d and 3d $3 45 $3 85 

3d 3 10 3 52 

4and5d 2 85 3 35 

-^.,<6and7d 2 75 3 20 

V>)and9d 2 60 3 00 

-10andl2d 2 55 2 95 

16 and 20d 2 50 2 90 

30, 40, 50 and 60d. (base) 2 45 2 85 

Wire nails in carlots are $2.77'/ 2 
Galvanizing 2o. per lb. net extra. 
Steel Out Nails 10c extra. 
Miscellaneous wire nails, dis. 70 and 10 p. c 



Coopers' nails, dis. 30 per cent. 
Flour barrel nails, dis 25 percent 

NAIL PULLERS. 
German and American 185 3 50 

NAIL SETS 
Square, round, and octagon 

per gross 3 38 4 00 

Diamond 12 00 15 00 

NETTING. 
Poultry, 55 per cent for McMullen's 

OAKUM. Per 100 lb. 

Navy 6 00 

U. S. Navy 7 25 

OIL. 

Water White (U.S.) 16/, 

Prime White (U.S) 15% 

Water White (Can.) 15 

Prime White(Can.) 14 

OILERS. 
McClary's Model galvan. oil 

can, with pump, 5 gal., 

perdoz 10 00 

Zinc and tin, dis. 50, 50 and 10. 

Copper, per doz 125 3 50 

Brass, " 1 50 3 50 

Malleable, dis. 25 per cent. 

GALVANIZED PAILS. 

Dufferin pattern pails, dis. 45 p.c. 
Flaring pattern, discount 45 per tent. 
Galvanized washtubs, discount 45 per cent. 

PIECED WARE. 
Discount 40 per cent, off list, June, 1899. 
10-qt. flaring sap buckets, die. 45 n.c. 
ft, lu and 14-qt. fl .ring pai s, dip. 45 p.c. 
Creamer cans, dis. 45 p c. 

PICKS. 
Per doz 6 00 9 00 

PICTURE NAILS. 

Porcelain head, per gross 175 3 00 

Brass head " 40 1 00 

PICTURE WIRE. 
Tin and gilt, discount 75 p c. 
PLANES. 
Wood, bench, Canadian dis. 50 per cent. 

American dis. 50. 
Wood, fancy Canadian or American 7% 
to 40 per cent. 

PLANE IRONS. 
English, per doz 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 

Button's Genuine per doz pairs, dis. 37% 

40 p.c. 
Button's Imitation, per doz.. 5 00 9 00 

German, perdoz 60 2 60 

PLUMBERS BRASS GOODS. 
Compression work, discount, 60 per cent. 
Fuller's work, discount 65 per cent. 
Rough stops and stop and waste cocks, dis- 
count, 60 percent. 
Jenkins disk globe and angle valves, dis- 
count, 55 percent. 
Standard valves, discount, 60 per per cent. 
Jenkins'radiator valves discount 55 percent. 
" " " standard, dis., 60 p.c. 

Quick opening valves discount, 60 p.c. 

No. 1 compression bath cock 2 00 

No. 4 " " " 2 00 

No. 7, Fuller's 2 50 

No 4%, " 3 00 

POWDER. 
Velox Smokeless Shotgun Powder. 

1001b. orless 85 

1,000 lb. or more 80 

Net 30 days. 
PRESSED SPIKES. 
Discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse, per doz 55 100 

Axle 22 33 

Screw 27 1 00 

Awning 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 1 80 3 60 

Canadian pitcher spout...., 1 40 2 10 
PUNCHES. 

Saddlers', perdoz 100 185 

Conductors', " 9 00 15 00 

Tinners' solid, perset 00 72 

" hollow, per inch.... 00 100 



RANGE BOILERS. 

Galvanized, 3 gallons 7 CO 

35 " 8 25 

40 " 9 50 

Copper, 30 " 22 00 

u 35 26 00 

" 40 " 30 00 

Discount off Copper Boilers 10 percent. 

RAKES. 
Cast steel and malleable, 50, 10 and 5 p.c. 
Wood, 25 per cent. 

RAZORS. 

per doz. 

Elliot's 4 00 18 00 

Geo. Butler* Co.'s 4 00 18 00 

Boker's 7 50 11 00 

King Cutter 12 50 50 00 

Wade & Butcher's 3 60 10 00 

Theile & Quack's 7 00 12 00 

REAPING HOOKS. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 
REGISTERS. 

Discount, 40 per cent. 

RIVETS AND BURRS. 
Iron Rivets, black and tinned, discount 60 

and lu per cent. 
Iron Burrs, Jiscount 55 per cent. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in 1-lb. cartons, %c. 

per lb. 
ExtraB on Iron Rivets in %-lb. cartons, lc. 

per lb. 
Copper Rivets 4 Burrs, 35 and 5 p.c. dis. 

and cartons, lc. per lb. extra, net. 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets 
%-lb. cartons, lc. per lb. 
RIVET SETS 
Canadian, dis. 35 to 37% per cent. 
ROPE ETC. 

Sisal. Manila. 
7-16 in. and larger, per lb 10 13% 

%in 11 14% 

% and 5-16 in 15% 

Cotton, 3-16 inch and larger 16 

" 5-32inch 21 

%inch 22% 

Russia Deep Sea 15% 

Jute 8 

Lath Yarn 9% 

New Zealand Rope 10 

RULES. 
Boxwood, dis. 75 and 10 p.c. 
Ivory, dis. 37% to 40 p,c. 

SAD IRONS. perset. 

MrB. Potts, No. 55, polished 62% 

" No. 50, nickle-plated 67% 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 
Dominion Flint Paper, 47% pe cent. 
B & A. sand, 40 and 5 per cent, 
fimery, 40 per cent. 
Garcet(Rurton's), 5 to 10 p.c. advance on list. 

SAP SPOUTS. 
Bronzed iron with hooks, per doz. . . 9 50 

SAWS. 
Hand Disston's, dis. 12% p.c. 
S. & D., 40 per cent. 

Crosscut, Disston's, per ft 35 55 

S. 4 D., dis. 35 p.c. on Nos. 2 and3. 

Hack, complete, each 75 2 75 

' frame only 75 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional, per 100 lbs 2 75 3 00 

Solid, " 2 00 2 25 

SASH CORD. 

er lb 23 30 

SAW SETS. 
" Lincoln" an 1 Wh ting, per doz.. . fi 00 
Hand Sets, No. 1 Woodyatt (Morrill) 4 25 
X-cut sets, No. 3 Woodyatt (Merrill) 9 50 

SCAliEo. 
Standard, f> p.c. 
Champion, 65 p.c. 
Spring Balances, 10 p.c. 
Fairbanks Standard, 35 p.c. 
" Dominion, 55 p.c. 

" Richelieu, 55 p.c. 

SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's perdoz 65 1 00 

SCREWS 
Wood, F. H., brfghtand cteel, 87% and lOp.c. 
Wood R. H., " dis. 82% and 10 p.c 
" F. H., brass, dis. 80 and 10 p.o. 



Wood, R. H., " dis. 75 and 10 p.c. 
" F.H., bronze, dis. 75 p.o. 
R.H. " 70 p.o. 

Drive Screws, 87% and 10 percent. 

Bench , wood, per doz 3 25 4 00 

" iron. " 4 25 5 75 

Set, Case hardened, 60 per cent. 
Square Cap, 50 and 5 per cent. 
Hexagon Cap, 45 per cent. 
SCYTHES. 

Per doz, net 9 00 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 

SHEARS. 
Bailey Cutlery Co., full nickeled, dis. 60 p.c 
Seymour s, dis. 50 and 10 p.o. 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 
Canadian, dis. 40 and 5 per cent. 

SINKS. 
Steel and galvanized, discount 45 per sent. 

SNAPS. 
Harness, German, dis. 25 p.c. 

Lock, Andrews' 4 50 1150 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

1, l%lb., perlb 37 

2 lb. or over, per lb 34 

SQUARES. 

Iron, No. 493, per doz 2 40 2 55 

" Mo. 494, " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, dis. 60. 10 and 5 p.c. 
Try and bevel, dis. 50 to 52% p.c. 
STAMPED WARE. 
Plain, dis. ,75 and 12% p.c. off revised list 
Retinned, dis., 75 p.c. off revised list. 

STAPLES. 

Galvanized 3 50 4 00 

Plain 3 21 3 75 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent. 
Poultry netting staples, 40 per cent. 
STOCKS AND DIES. 
American dis. 25 p.o. 

STONE. Per lb. 

Washita 28 60 

Hindostan 06 07 

" slip 09 09 

Labrador 013 

_ " Axe 15 

Turkey 50 

Arkansas 00 150 

Water-of-Ayr 00 10 

Scythe, per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind. 2in, 40 to 200 lb.per ton .... 25 00 

" under 40 lb. " 28 00 

Grind, under 2 in. thick " 29 00 

STOVE PIPES. 

5 and 6 inch Per 100 lengths 7 00 

7 inch " " 7 50 

ENAMELINE STOVE POLISH. 
No. 4— 3 dozen in case, net cash .... $4 80 
No. 6— 3 dozen in case, " .... 8 40 
TACKS BRADS, ETC. 

' Per cent 

Strawberry box tacks, bulk 75 4 10 

Cheese-box tacks, blued 80 4 12% 

Trunk tacks, black and tinned ... .85 

Carpet tacks, blued 80 4 15 

11 ""tinned 80 4 20 

" " (in kegs) 40 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only ..80 

" % weights 60 

Swedes cut tacks, blued and tinned— 

In bulk 80 4 10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholBterers', bulk... 85, 12% 4 12% 
" brush, blued 4 tinned, bulk.. 70 
" gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 412% 

Zino tacks 35 

Leather carpet tacks 55 

Copper tacks 50 

Copper nails 5!% 

Trunk nails, black 65 and 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout nails, blued 65 and 5 

Chair nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing 40 

Picture frame points 10 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 



32 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



PITTSBURGH, 

U. S. A. 



MANUFACTURERS 
OF" 



STANDARD CHAIN CO., 

CHAIN 

Proof Coil, B.B., B.B.B., Crane, Dredge Chain, Trace Chains. Cow Ties etc. 

ALEXANDER GIBB, n j- -o * *• A. C. LESLIE & CO., 

M« n tS5l ' -Canadian Representatives- Montreal 



OF ALL KINDS. 



Montreal. 

For Provinces of Ontario and Quebec. 



For other Provinces. 



Lining tacks, in bulk 15 

" solid heada, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails in papers 10 

■' " in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in dozens only 60 

Tin capped trunk nails 15 

Zino glazier's points vi."" J ,5 

Double pointed tacks, papers 90 and 10 

" " '• bulk 40 

TAPE LINES. 
English, ass skin, per doz... . 2 75 5 00 
English, Patent Leather.... 5 50 9 75 

Oheaterman's each 90 2 85 

steel, each ... . 80 8 00 
THERMOMETERS. 
Tin case and dairy, dls. 75 to 75 and 10 p.o. 

TRAPS. (Steel.) 
Same, Newhouse, dis. 25 p.c. 
Game, H. &N„ P. S. 4 W., 65 p.o. 
Game, steel, 72%, 75 p.o. 

TROWELS. 

Disston's discount 10 per cent. 

German, per doz 4 75 6 00 

8. * D., discount 35 per cent. 
TWINES. 

Bag, Russian, per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply 18V 2 

■ ¥ " 4-ply 23% 

Mattress, per lb 33 45 

Staging, " 27 35 



VISES. 

Wright's 13V, 

Brook's 12 3 4 

Pipe Vise, Hinge, No. 1 3 50 

" No 2 5 50 

SawViBe 4 53 9 00 

ENAMELLED WARE. 
White, Princess, Turquoise, Blue and White, 

discount 50 per cent. 
Diamond, Famous, Premier, 50 and 10 p.c. 
Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Orescent, 50, 10 

and 10 per cent. 

WIRE. 

Brass wire, 50 to 50 and 2% per oent. off the 

list. 
Copper wire, 45 and 10 per oent. net cash 30 
days, f.o.b. factory. 
Smooth Steel Wire, is quoted at the 
following net selling prices : 

No. 6to8 gauge $2 90 

" 9 " 2 80 

" 10 " 2 87 

" 11 " 2 90 

" 12 " 2 95 

'• 13 " 3 15 

" 14 " 3 37 

" 15 " 3 50 

" 16 " 3 65 

Other sizes of plain wire outBide of Nos. 9, 
10, 11, 12 and 13. and other varieties of 
plain wire remain at $2.81 base with 



extras as before. The prices for Nos. 9' 
to 13 include the charge of lie 
for oiling. Extras net per 100 lb.: 
Coppered wire, 60c— tinned wire, $2— 
oiling, 10o.— special hay-bailing wire, 30c. 
—spring wire, $1— best steel wire, 75c— 
bright soft drawn, 15c— in 50 and 100-lb. 
bundles net, 10c— in 25-lb. bundles net 
15c— packed in casks or cases, 15c— 
bagging or papering, 10c. 

Fine Steel Wire, dis. 17% per oent. 
List of extras : In 100-lb. lots : No. 
17, $5-No.l8, $5.50-No. 19, $6-No. 20, 
86.65-No. 21, $7— No. 22, $7.30— No. 23, 
7.65 -No. 24, $8— No. 25, $9— No. 26, 
$9.50-No. 27, $10-No. 28. $11 No. 29. 
$12-No. 30, $13— No. 31, $14-No. 32, $15 
No. 33, $16— No. 34. $17. Extras net- 
tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, $2— Nos. 26-31 
$4— Nos. 32-34, $6. Coppered, 5c— oil 
ing, 10c— in 25-lb. bundles, 15c— in 5 and 
10-lb. bundles. 25c— in 1-lb. hanks, 50c— 
in Vi-lb. hanks, 75c— in Vi-lb. hanks, $1— 
packed in casks orcases, 15c— bagging or 
papering, lOo. 

Galvanized Wire, perlOOlb.— Nos. 6,7.8, $3 50 
to $3 85— No. 9, $2.85 to $3.15— No. 10 
$3.60 to .$3.95— No. 11, $3.70 to $4.10-No 
12, $3 to $3 30— No. 13, $3.10 to $3.40— 
No. 14, $4.10 to $4.50-No. 15, $4.60 to 
$5.05— No. 16. $4.85 to $5 35. Base sizes, 
Nos. 6 to 9, 82.57y 2 f-o b. Cleveland. 

Clothes Line Wire, solid 7 strand, No. 17. 



$4.25; No. 18, $2.65; No. 19, $2.35, f.o.b 
Hamilton, Toronto, Montreal. 
WIRE FENCING. 



F.O.B. 

Toronto 
3 1-5 
3 05 



Galvanized barb 

Galvanized, plain twist 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $2.82% 
in less than carlots, and $2.70 in carlots. 

WIRE CLOTH. 
Painted Screen, per 100 aq. ft., net.. 1 35 
WASTE COTTON. per lb. 

Colored 4% to 5 

White, according to quality 6% to 7% 

500-lb bale lota shaded. 

WRENCHES. 
A.cme, 35 to 37% per cent. 
Agricultural, 60 p.c. 
Coe'a Genuine, dis. 20 to 25 p.c. 

Towers' Engineer, each 2 00 7 00 

" 8., per doz 5 80 6 00 

G. ft K 's Pipe, per doz 3 40 

Burrell's Pipe, each 3 00 

Pocket , per doz 25 2 90 

WRINGERS. 

Leader per doz. $30 33 00 

Royal Canadian.. " 26 00 28 00 

Royal American., " 26 00 28 00 

Sampsoa " 30 00 

Terms 4 months, or 3 p.c. 30 days. 
WROUGHT IRON WASHERS. 
Canadian make, discount, 40 per cent. 



ADVERTISING inWESTERN CANADA 

will be Carefully, Efficiently, and Promptly 
attended to, by 

The Roberts Advertising Agency, 

WINNIPEG CANADA. 






"KEY CABINET" to hand and we are 

pleased with it." JOHN MILLEN & SON, 

Montreal. 
Cabinets for all kinds of goods fitted with 

BENNETT'S PATENT SHELF BOX 

Made to Order. 




For particulars apply to the patentee 
and manufacturer. 

J. S. BENNETT, 20 Sheridan Ave, TORONTO 



DIAMOND 

U.9. Patent June 25th, 1895 



STOVE PIPE 



DAMPER. 

Canadian Patent December 13th, 1894 




Made by THE ADAMS COMPANY, Dubuque, Iowa, U.S.A. A. R. WOODYATT & CO., Guelph, Ont 




"THE EMLYN" SAW BENCH 

Made in 6 sizes. Best value obtainable. Specially 
designed for expoit. With or without " Emlyn " 
Patent Guard. Sole maker — 

CHARLES D. PHILLIPS, 

Cables — Emlyn Engineering Works, 

"Machinery," Newport. Newpokt, Mon. , England. 



IF THE WORDS 

"Dundas Axe' 



are stamped on an Axe, you can 
rely on its being the best that 
can be made. 



DUNDAS AXE WORKS 

Dundas, Ont. 

PERSONS addressing advertisers 
will kindly mention having 
seen their advertisement in 
Canadian Hardware and Metal 
Merchant. 



Lockerby & McComb 

AGENTS IN CANADA 

FOR THE 



Celebrated P. & B. 

Cold Storage Lining 



AND 



. . Ruberoid Roofing . . 

P. S. --Prices on Application. 

65 Shannon Street, MONTREAL. 






I 



BUSINESS 
NEWS 

of any kind that is of value to business men 
supplied by our Bureau. We can give you 
market quotations from any town in Can- 
ada, reports from the city markets, stock 
quotations, etc. You can get commercial 
news from any Canadian paper through us. 

Write us, giving us particulars of what 
you want and where you want it from, and 
we will quote you prices by return. 

"Clippings from any Canadian paper on 
any subject." 

"CANADIAN PREsTcLlPPiNG BUREAU, 

232 McGill Street, MONTREAL, QUE. 
Telephone Main 1255. 
10 Front St. East, Toronto. Telephone 2148. 



75 YEARS. 

CELEBRATED 



HEINISCH 



ESTABLISHED 1825. 

SHEARS. 



75 YEARS. 



Tailors' Shears, ^ 

Trimmers, Scissors, 
Tinners' Snips, ete. 




ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST 



R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. KIwARK R N.?. FF ^s E :A 9oCha,nber • 8, • 

Not connected with any Shear Combination. 

CHAS. F. CLARK, President. JARED CHITTENDEN, Treasurer. 

...ESTABLISHED 1849... 



Capital and Surplus, $1,500,000. 



Offices Throughout the Civilized World, 



Executive Offices : Nos. 346 and 348 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers information that reflects the financial condition and 
the controlling circumstances of every seeker of mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the 
merchants, by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information no 
effort is spared, and no reasonable expense considered too great, that the results may justify its claim as an 
authority on all matters affecting commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have 
been steadily extended, and it furnishes information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized 
world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, jobbing 
and manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporations. 
Specific terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of its offices. Correspondence Invited. 



-OFFICES IN CANADA — 



HALIFAX, N.S. 
OTTAWA. ONT. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 
QUEBEC, QUE. 
VICTORIA, B.C. 



LONDON, ONT. 
ST. JOHN. N.B. 
WINNIPEG, MAN. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



THOS. C. IRVING, Gen, Man. Western Canada, Toronto. JOHN A. FULTON, Gen. Man, Eastern Canada, Montreal. 



TRADE 




MARK 



IVobles 8? Hoar e. 

CORNWALL ROAD STAMFORD STREET. 

LONDON, ENC. 

Manufacturers of 

HIGH-CLASS VARNISHES ONLY 



Which can be obtained direct from the works 
or from the principal Color Dealers in Canada. 



*m->fki« -i- — .--> tf^S???* K 1)1 \ ! 



"BRASSITE" 




None genuine without the 
above "Trade Mark." 

"Gunn's" 

Patent 

"Grassite" 

Goods. 

Equal to Solid Brass in every 
particular. Cost less money — 
look and wear as well. Our 
sales are increasing all the lime. 
Why not increase your sales ? 

IKE GUNH CASTOR CO, 



Limited. 



KNOX HENRY, Canadian Agent, Room 32, Canada Life Bldg., MONTREAL. 



i 



! 



■•t. IMS 




InclM6 



BlackDiamond File Works 

6. & H. Barnett Company 



PHILADELPHIA 



Twelve 



*<«*. Medals 




I 



Awarded 
By JURORS at 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 




^-v-wwrw^w^-w-^ 



* 



1901 





E. '901 



We manufacture the most popular and best 
selling lines of Garden Hose in Canada. Our "Mal- 
tese Cross" brand we confidently recommend as 
the finest Garden Hose on the market. 

We have other grades not quite so expensive, 
but good reliable brands, viz. : "Lion" (the popular 
medium-priced hose), "King" "Sun" and "Leader. '< 

Our "Kinkproof " (wire wound) hose is wired 
by a special process controlled solely by ourselves, 
and is so constructed that it may be cut at any 
wind of the wire without loosening or uncoiling, 
the wire being self-gripping throughout each 
length. 

The Gutta Pergha and Rubber Mfg. Go. 

OF TORONTO, LIMITED. 

Head Office and Warerooms- 
49-61-63 West Front St., 

TORONTO, C anada. 

Factories— 1 15-165 West Lodge Ave. 
124-148 O'Hara Ave. 



American Sheet Steel Co., £ORDAGE 



NEW YORK. 



Galvanized Steel Sheets, 

Black Steel Sheets, 

Dewees Wood Co.'s Polished Sheets. 



American Tin Plate Co., 

NEW YORK. 

Coke, Charcoal, and Terne Plates. 



PRICES ON APPLICATION TO 

B.&S.H. THOMPSON &C0'Y 

28 St. Sulpice St., MONTREAL, 

Selling Agents for Canada. 



ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



Manila Rope 
Sisal Rope 
Jute Rope 
Russian Rope 
Marline 
Housellne 
Hambrollne 
Clotheslines 
Tarred Hemp Rope 
White Hemp Rope 
Bolt Rope 
Hide Rope 
Halyards 
Deep Sealine 
Ratline 
Plow Lines 



Lathyarn 
Shingleyarn 
Bale Rope 
Lariat Rope 
Hemp Packing 
Italian Packing 
Jute Packing 
Drilling Cables 
Spunyarn 
Pulp Cord 
Lobster Martin 
Paper Cord 
Cheese Cord 
Hay Rope 
Fish Cord 
Sand Lines 



'RED THREAD" Transmission Rope from the finest quality Manila 
hemp obtainable, laid in tallow. 



CONSUMERS CORDAGE COMPANY 



"Limited 



Western Ontario Representative— 

WM. B. STEWART, 
Tel 94. 27 Front St. West, TORONTO. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 



Copper, Tin, Antimony, Etc 

LANG WILL'S BABBITT 

Montreal. 




The Weekly Organ of the Hardware. Metal, Heating, Plumbing and Contracting Trades in Canada. 



VOL. XIII. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, JULY 27, 1901. 



NO. 30 



"TIBET MTI-FRICTIOH METAL. 



The Most Economical. 
The Least Wearing. 
The Moat Durable. 

Friction Preventing. 



'Tandem" Metals are better than 
any other for their purpose, 
and are, therefore : 

Resistance Reducing. 
Journal Preserving. 
Power Increasing. 
Lubricant Saving. 



A QUALITY 

For Heaviest Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Heavy Pressure and High Speed. 

B QUALITY 

For Heavy Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Medium Pressure and High Speed. 

C QUALITY 

For Medium Pressure and High Speed 
or Low Pressure and Highest Speed. 

Sole Agents : 

LAMPLOUGH & McNAUGHTON, 59 St. Sulpice Street, MONTREAL. 

THE TANDEM SMELTING SYNDICATE, LIMITED 

The largest smelters of Anti-Friction Queen Victoria St., London, E.C. 

Metals in Europe. 




A Simple Proposition. 



If the object of galvanizing Sheet Iron is to 
protect from rust, it pays to get the fullest 
protection. In other words, it pays to use 
"Queen's Head" brand, which is un- 
equalled by any on the market. 



JOHN LYSAOHT, Limited, Makers, A. C. LESLIE & CO., MONTREAL, 
BRISTOL, EN6. Managers Canadian Branch, 






GOOD POINTS. 

The Safford Radiator 

has a score of them, but there is one which success has accented — 
it's simplicity. Like all other great inventions, the "SAFFORD" 
is ingeniously simple. It is connected at the joints by patent 
screw nipples. That's what made the "SAFFORD" suc- 
cessful — no bolts, no packing — just a plain screwed 
connection. This means that the "SAFFORD" is posi- 
tively non-leakable — positively durable. Of all Radiators 
the "SAFFORD" alone possesses this simple device. 

The "SAFFORD" is made in many designs and 
heights, and is always graceful in its lines and bulk. It 
is made to fit in corners, to circle pillars, and for bay 
windows. 

We will be pleased to give you any information you desire. Remember, we are the 
Largest Radiator Manufacturers under the British Flag. 

THE DOMINION RADIATOR COMPANY, Limited, TORONTO. 




Lawn 
Mowers 



t£+ %?V ^?W vW %*♦ ^JW wW %■♦ W*^ y » *^> *J#~ "^T 1 * vt %!W WSv ^r #• ^ >• *y <~ ^r#* *% <" tt** 



... AND ... 



LAWN SEATS 

AND ^r 

VASES. 



Garden Q 
Hose 



Special Mowers 

n FOR 

Golf Grounds and 
Tennis Courts. 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



LIMITED 



WRITE FOR PRICES. 



Ill l l lll llll 



TORONTO. 



METALS. 



Antimony, Copper, Lead, Tin, Zinc 



SAMUEL, SONS & BENJAMIN, - - LONDON AND LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND 

M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin & Co. 

General Importers and Exporters and Metal Merchants 

27 Wellington Street West, - - TORONTO, ONT. 



i 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



James Cartland & Son 

Manufacturers of every description of Limited 

CABINET, BUILDERS', FURNISHING AND NAVAL BRASSFOUNDRY 
BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND. 



t> 




London Showrooms: 57 Holborn Viaduct, E.C. 



HOSE 




WATER 

STEAM 

AIR 

FIRE 

BABCOCK 



SUCTION 

ACID 

OIL 

SODA WATER 

HIGH-PRESSURE 



Our Patent Seamless Tube is, without doubt, 

the only perfect construction. 

The Canadian Rubber Co., 

CAPITAL - - - $1,500,000 00. 

Montreal. Toronto. Winnipeg. 



Other Tools are very 
good Tools, but 



"YANKEE TOOLS" 



ARE 
BETTER 



"YANKEE" 
HATCHET SCREW DRIVER 

NSI5 




Our "YANKEE" Tool Book 
tells all about them. M ailed 
free on application 



No. 15. ■■ Yankee Ratchet Screw Driver, with Finger Turn on Blade. 




C : I— — — _5— sJ 



No. 30 " Yankee" Spiral-Ratchet Screw Driver, Right and Left Hand. 




No. 41. Yankee" Automatic Drill," Eight Drill Points in Handle. 




Manufacturers also of 

LIGHTNING, 

GEM and 

BLIZZARD 
Ice Cream Freezers. 

Toy Freezers, 

Ice Shaves and 

Ice Chlppers. 

Fluting Machines, 

Hand Flitters. 



No. 50. "Yankee " Reciprocating Drill, for Iron, Steel, Brass, Wood, etc. 



Sold by Leading Jobbers 
in Canada. 




No. 60. 

Pocket Magazine 

Screw Driver. 



NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 

Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



FOR WARM AIR HEATING. 

Our many lines of coal and wood furnaces offer a range of sizes and styles 
that afford complete satisfaction — everywhere. 

OUR LATEST CONSTRUCTION' 

"The Oxford 

are unequalled in excellence — combining enormous power with gratifying economy. 
Their improved points of construction will interest every practical dealer or buyer. 

They are made with Steel Plate Radiators, and supplied either portable, as shown, 

r l ■ i Oxford 400 Series, Portable. 

or stationary for brick setting. 

Our Little Ox and Oxford Furnaces fOP WOOd are already in favorable use ail oveA the country, their incomparable 
popularity having been gained by superior merit. 

Consult our catalogue for full information about these splendid lines — to handle tfoem will insure the most satisfying 
trade possible. 





THE GURNEY FOUNDRY CO., Limited 

TORONTO. WINNIPEG. VANCOUVER. 

THE GURNEY-MASSEY CO , LIMITED, MONTREAL. 



DOMINION WIRE MANUFACTURING CO. 



Limited. 



MONTREAL 




I TORONTO 

w 



Manufacturers of 

Wire Nails 

Wood Screws 

Bright Wire Goods 

Baling Wire 

Broom and Mattress Wire 

Galvanized Wire 
Staples 

Crescent Coat and Hat Hooks 

Jack Chain Wire Door Pulls 

Cotter Pins Barb Wire 

WRITE FOR PRICES AND DISCOUNTS- 



I 



i 



thFnewIaIdwinI 

DRY AIR CLEANABLE 

REFRIGERATOR. 

135 Modern Varieties. Ash, Oak and Soft-wood Finishes 

METAL, PORCELAIN, SPRUCE LININGS. 

BALDWIN 

Positive Circulation- 
Sanitary— Odorless. 
Latest Cleanable Fea- 
tures — The Strongest 
and Best System of 
Patent Removable 
Metal Air-Flues. 
Air-Tight Lever Looks 
Bali-Bearing Casters. 
Swing Base— in and 

out. 
Rubber around Doors 
and Lids, making 
them doubly air-tight. 
Handsome Designs. 
Moderate Prices. 

Built in the newest, largest and best equipped refrigerator plant in the East 
run all the year round on refrigerators exclusively; stock goods; special 
refrigerators and coolers in sections. 

Handsome Trade Catalogue Ready. 

Baldwin Refrigerator Co., 

BURLINGTON, VERMONT. 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Henry Disston & Sons 



(INCORPORATED) 

ILADELPHIA, PA., U.S.A. 



RASPS. 




Henry Disston & Sons Taper Saw Files. 



Henry Disston & Sons Round Files. 




ggWg'S S ^Sgg^&S^- ' ■" '■-"'""' ' >AjJ;M«N«* 




Henry Disston & Sons Great American Saw File. 




Henry Disston & Sons Mill Saw Files. 




Henry Disston & Sons Flat Bastard Files. 




Henry Disston & Sons Horse Rasps. 

Mail Orders Shipped Same Day as Received. 



lewis Bros. & Co., 



AGENTS 

MONTREAL 



Henry Disston & Sons, 

(INCORPORATED) 

PHILADELPHIA, PA., U.S.A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HENRY ROGERS, 
SONS & CO., 

SHEFFIELD, ENGL AN I 

Manufacturers of the celebrated 




HRS*C° 

UNION JACK 

CUTLERY 

We make a specialty of 

PLATED WARE, 
FRUIT KNIVES, ETC. 

Our Canadian Representative carries a full line 
of samples. 

Canadian Office : 

6 St. Sacrament St., MONTREAL 

F. A. YORK, Manager. 




CET THE ORIGINAL. 

We lead, others imitate. 

E. T. WRIGHT £ CO. 

Manufacturers, HAMILTON, ONT. 

KNOX HENRY 

Heavy Hardware and Metal Broker 
Room 32, Canada Life Bldg., MONTREAL. 




Samples sent free on application. 

HORSE NAILS — " C" Brand Horse - Nails 
Canada Horse Nail Co. 

"BRASSITE" GOODS — Gunn Castor Co. 
Limited, Hlrmiugliam, Eng. 






Will Hold Dp a Shelf! 

That's what a shell' bracket is for. 
For this purpose there can he 

NOTHING BETTER 
NOTHING CHEAPER 

than the .... 

BRADLEY STEEL SHELF BRACKET 

It is well Japanned, Strong and Light. 

The saving in freight is a good profit, aside 
from the lower price at which the goods are sold. 
Bag" Order director through your jobber. 

ATLAS MFG. CO., New Haven, Conn.. U.S. A 




PANADIAN ADVERTISING is best done by THE 
^ E. DESBARATS ADVERTISING AGENCY 
Montreal. 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John Street, Montreal 

Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishing to be represented in Canada. 



STEVENS-MAYNARD JR- RIFLE* 



The 

Young Gentleman's 

Rifle. 




The 

Young Gentleman's 

Rifle. 



If you want the best cheap rifle ever made we have it in the Stevens-Maynard Jr. It 
will be a great seller this year. Better place order now. 



The leading Jobbers handle Stevens products. 



J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co., p ° 2 *°* Chicopee Falls, Mass., U.S.A. 



t 

t 




This eight-foot Brake bends 22-gauge inoo 
and lighter, straight and true. 

Price, $60 

Very handy header attachment, $15 extra 

if required. 

Send for circulars and testimonials to 

Ibe Double Truss Cornice 
Brake Co, !5£5™2£u°2L 



The Latest and Best. 

H. & R. Automatic Ejecting 
Single Gun. 



Model 
1900. 



Steel and Twist Barrels 
in 30 and 32-inch. 

12 Gauge. 




Worcester, Mass., U.S.A. 

Descriptive Catalogue on request. 




LONDON FENCE 
MACHINES 



Lead on Every Point. 



London Safety Tackle Blocks are equally efficient for 
stretching Coiled Spring Wire and for use as a Hoisting 
Block. They are Ai and rapid sellers. 

TOWNSEND (Lever) STRETCHERS 
BERNARD CUTTING PLIERS 

Only one agency for our machines in each town. Get 
our prices, terms and discounts. ^ 

Coiled Spring and other Fence Wire at right prices to 
the trade. 



London Fence Machine Co., London, Can. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ESTABLISHED I860. 



INCORPORATED 1895 



SB JJSee 



SEP 29 

1901 Style 




PATENT 
APPLIED FOR 



"Empire" 



Stove Pipe 



Made in 5, 6 and 7 inches. 
Nested in Crates of 25 each. 

Simplest Stove Pipe to put together yet made- 
required are a pair of hands. 



-only tools 



Where time is an object, we will guarantee that six of our 
"EMPIRE" STOVE PIPES can be put together in the 
same length of time as one of various other makes, and 
will stay put together. 



THE THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Limited, MONTREAL, QUE. 



"KEY CABINET" to hand and we are 
pleased with it." JOHN MILLEN & SON, 

Montreal. 
Cabinets for all kinds of goods fitted with 

BENNETT'S PATENT SHELF BOX 

Midi to Order. 




For particulars apply to the patentee 
and manufacturer. 

J. S. BENNETT, 20 Sheridan Ave., TORONTO 



ftvtl-0 -fO-PAV Yn£rJ, 

DO YOl/? 

ihptirertisemeti t 
•*• in the * 

To^orJ-ro 

uritl b ring you, 
' •>*•? k> -', fast contractors 




LONG DISTANCE WARMING 

WITH WARM AIR 




is possible of accomplishment only by 

the use of the "Patent Positive 
Attachment" as applied to 




Corrugated 
Warm-Air 



Generators 



(PATENTED) 



Th'.S cut bhoAs how any required number of the long, hollow, corrugated sections can be capped, 
and by extending a warm-air conducting pipe from such attachment, all heat generated by those particu- 
lar sections must be delivered in the room so connected. 

IT PAYS DEALERS to secure an agency for the "Kelsey," as it gives them a specialty and 
something to discuss with prospective purchasers beside the price. 

THE KELSEY IS THE ONLY WARM AIR DEVICE that will warm and ventilate 
schools, churches and large residences properly and economically. 

WHY NOT GET RIGHT UP IN FRONTWITH US ? 

THE JAMES SMART MEG. CO., Limited, Brockville, Ont. 

Exclusive Makers for Canada. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 





No. 58-ROYAL BRONZE. 
158— PLATED FINISHES. 




No 55— ROYAL BRONZE. 
155— PLATED FINISHES. 



HAND RAIL 



PLATED FINISHES 


Self Brass, Bronze, 


Nickel, 


Old Copper 




ORNAMENTAL 


BRASS 


ORNAMENTAL 


BRONZE 


ORNAMENTAL 


NICKEL 



No. 60— ROYAL BRONZE. 
160— PLATED FINISHE8. 



BRACKETS 



Manufactured by . . 



ALL PACKED WITH SCREWS TO MATCH FINISH. 



A. R. WOODYATT & CO., Guelph, Canada. 



Sold only through 
the wholesale trade. 



Kemp's Seamless Steel Kitchen Sinks 

are pressed out of sheets of cold wrought steel and are 
unbreakable. Owing to their comparative lightness, 
you will have less freight to pay than on the heavy 
cumbersome Cast Iron Sinks. 

Being made without seams or joints and being 
rounded at sides and corners, it is easy to keep them 
clean, and they are perfectly odorless. 

Each one is neatly and smoothly finished. 

They are provided with Strainers and connections with Brass Bolts that cannot rust out. 

Made in three styles of finish. 

Painted, Galvanized, Enameled. 

( 16 x 24 

3 sizes < 18 x 30 

( .8x36 

WE WILL BE PLEASED TO NAME YOU PRICES 

Kemp Manufacturing Co'y, Toronto. 





VOL. XIII. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. JULY 27, 1901. 



NO. 30. 



President, 

JOHN BAYNE MacLEAN. 

Montreal. 

THE MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO. 

Limited. 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which cir- 
culate in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North- West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E, 
Island and Newfoundland. 

orriois 

MONTREAL 23a McGill Street, 

Telephone 1155. 

TORONTO 10 Front Street East, 

Telephone 2148, 

LONDON, END log Fleet Street, E.C.. 

W. H. Miln. 
MANCHESTER, ENQ. • ■ - 18 St Ann Street. 

H. S. Ashburner. 
WINNIPEG .... Western Canada Block, 

J. J. Roberts. 
ST. JOHN, N.B. - - - No. 3 Market Wharf, 

I. Hunter White, 
NEW YORK. 176 E. 88th Street. 

Subscription, Canada and the United States, $2.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere - - • 12s. 

Published every Saturday. 

r>-si. iMn.. (Adscript, London. 
Cable Address } Adscripti Canada. 



■WHEN WRITjNG ADVERTISERS 
PLEASE M ENTION THAT YOU SAW 
THEIR ADVERTISEMENT INTHISPAPER 



THE STRIKE AND STEEL PRICES. 

UNLESS something at present not in 
sight intervenes it is becoming more 
and more evident that the strike in 
the United States among what is generally 
termed the steel trades is likely to be a 
protracted one. 

Its seriousness is daily becoming more 
apparent. And the result is an unmistak- 
able hardening in prices in many lines of 
iron and steel. 

"■""Pipe, sheets and tinplates are decidedly 
firm, and in some instances quotably higher. 
Tinplates are particularly strong. Already 
a scarcity is being felt in the United States, 



where as much as a premium of $1.25 per 
box has been paid in order to obtain 
delivery. While as great an increase as 
this is not general, substantial premiums 
have been paid in not a few instances. 
Stocks of tinplates at the beginning of the 
strike were light and chiefly held by con- 
sumers. 

In sympathy with the condition of affairs 
in the United States the British tinplate 
market is excited, and several advances 
have taken place, it being evident, from 
the inquiries which have been received, 
that there will be quite a demand from the 
United States should the strike be at all 
protracted. 

The conditions of affairs in Great Britain 
and the United States have not been with- 
out their influence in Canada. Users of 
tinplates evince quite a desire to antici- 
pate their requirements, and our quotations 
are this week marked up 25c. per box. 

Advices from Pittsburg say that the de- 
mand for black and galvanized sheets is so 
heavy that prompt deliveries cannot be had 
except at a premium over regular prices. 
Our quotations on common black sheets are 
10 to 15c. higher than they were a week 
ago. Sheets show an advance of 30c. in 
Pittsburg within the last ten days. 

All varieties of steel are stiffening in 
price, and in Canada quite an interest has 
been awakened in the iron and s'teel trades, 
particularly in regard to such lines as come 
largely from the United States and which 
are most likely to be influenced by the 
strike. 

Pig iron seems to be the only line at the 



moment which does not appear to be har- 
dening in price as a result of the strike. It 
had first to suffer from the effects of the 
strike of the machinists ; and now, just as 
that strike is collapsing, another of still 
greater proportions and of longer duration 
springs up. It is not surprising that the 
pig iron market in the United States is this 
week reported to be dull with an easy 
tendency. 



THE PIG TIN MARKET. 

THE past week has been another strik- 
ing one for the pig tin market, par- 
ticularly in London, England, where, 
in three days, spot prices declined ^11 per 
ton, while the difference between the lowest 
point and the comparatively recent highest 
point was no less than £20 per ton. 
Futures are also lower, declining about £2 
per ton during the early part of the week. 

In New York the weakness has not been 
nearly as pronounced as in London, but 
still it was unsettled and dull. 

On Wednesday a reaction set in, for, 
although the market opened weak on that 
day it closed firm. The improvement really 
began a few days before that, for, while 
spot prices continued to fall up to the 
middle of the week, the cables reported that 
nearby dates were selling at better prices. 

The statistical position of tin is not un- 
favorable. It is estimated that stocks in 
the United States, on August 1, will be 700 
tons less than they were on July 1, while it 
is now the period of the year when the 
demand is usually larger than the pro- 
duction. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



CANADA AND THE RECIPROCITY QUESTION. 



RECIPROCITY is a question which is 
again receiving some attention from 
commercial organizations in the 
I hited States. A short time ago The 
National Association of Manufacturers' in 
session at Detroit adopted, a resolution 
recommending the calling of a general con- 
vention for the consideration of reciprocity 
treaties with foreign countries. Since then 
two important, and influential commercial 
bodies in the United States have adopted 
resolutions asking the President and Con- 
gress to take steps to negotiate a recipro- 
city treaty with Canada. The one was The 
Boston Chamber of Commerce and the other 
The Merchants' Association of New York. 

The business men across the border real- 
ize that self-contained and all as the United 
Sillies is. it is not altogether independent 
of other nations for the development of its 
trade and commerce. One gathers that 
from a perusal of the reciprocity resolutions 
recently adopted, and particularly from that 
of The Merchants' Association of New York. 

. " The manufactured products of the Uni- 
ted States," reads the preamble of that 
resolution, "are constantly increasing and 
are already exceeding the demands of home 
consumption ; and whereas this over-pro- 
diietion is a serious and growing menace to 
the commercial interests of this country ; 
and whereas the opening of foreign markets 
upon such terms and conditions as will 
enable the manufacturers of this country to 
dispose of their product advantageously 
therein will furnish a preventative for this 

threatening evil Resolved.— The 

Merchants' Association of New York hereby 
urges upon I he President and Congress that 
such immediate steps be taken as in their 
judgment will result in the consummation 
of a mutually advantageous reciprocal trade 
agreement between the United States and 
( lanada." 

The resolution adopted 1>\ The Boston 
Chamber of Commerce is little less em- 
phatic in regard to the importance of 
foreign markets, and recognizes equally as 
fully the importance of Canada's trade. 
" Canada," it says, " is our nearest, and, 
in some respects our best foreign market." 

The export trade of the I niter] States 
during the fiscal year recently ended was 
nearly $1,500,000,000 and the excess of ex- 
ports over imports nearly $665,000,000. 
Compared with ten years ago the increase is 

enonilOUS. But while the conditions are so 

satisfactory it is the future that is causing 
uneasiness to the commercial interests of 
the United States. 

The attitude of the United States to- 
wards other nations, in a commercial sense, 



has been that of the ancient Jews toward 
the Samaritans. They wanted no dealings 
with them, with this difference : The 
United States wanted to sell to other 
nations, but she did not want to buy from 
them. And in order that she might not 
buy from them she has surrounded herself 
with a Customs tariff which averages about 
"55 per cent.— about double that of the Can- 
adian tariff. 

This policy was irritating at all times, 
but it became increasingly so as the pro- 
ducts of United States factories invaded in 
larger volume the markets of Europe. Now, 
nearly every nation in Continental Europe 
is up in arms, in a commercial sense, 
against the United States ; and leagaies and 
other devices against that country are 
openly and vigorously advocated. Many of 
them are visionary and impracticable, no 
doubt, but there is more than a possibility 
that some of them will crystallize into some- 
thing that will be anything but helpful to 
the export trade of the United States. 

" Vic see," said the President of The 
National Association of Manufacturers, in 
his address at Detroit, " industrial Ger- 
many aroused and alarmed by the encroach- 
ment of American competition. . . . We 
see Russia incensed because her friendly 
efforts to secure commercial courtesies in 
return for valuable concessions extended to 
us have been cavalierly ignored and greal 
injustice done to her. France has waited 
patiently for nearly two years to give us 
abundant time to consider propositions 
touching mutual trade concessions. . . . 
Even Austria and Switzerland . . . are 
expressing with much emphasis their dis- 
satisfaction with our national policy which 
seeks to obtain all possible trade advan- 
tages anil yet is unwilling to concede any 
favors in return." 

One, too, cannot but be struck in perus- 
ing the trade and daily press of Great 
Britain to notice that, in that country there 
is developing a sentiment in favor of some- 
thing being done in the way of legislation 
or combinations to meet the competition of 
the country with the jug-handled trade 
policy. 

In Canada we are not sufficiently con- 
cerned to be actively interested in the move- 
ment across the border for reciprocity, even 
as far as it relates to this country. At 
present at any rate we do not consider it 
within the pale of practical politics. There 
was at one time a strong sentiment in this 
country in favor of reciprocity with the 
United States, and possibly if it was 
thought that there was any likelihood of 
such a treaty, and particularly an equitable 
one, being forthcoming we might again be 
in favor of it. But we have not at present 
the slightest belief that Congress will adopt 
a reciprocity treaty, and particularly one 



that would be fair to Canada. Of course, 
we may be mistaken in our premise, just as 
the people were 47 years ago when Lord 
Elgin, contrary to their expectations, suc- 
cessfully negotiated the reciprocity treaty 
of 1854. But in the meantime we are afraid 
that no good thing can come out of Naz- 
areth. 

Canada's efforts are now centred in de- 
veloping her trade with the countries within 
the Empire to which we belong and not so 
much that of the continent to which we 
belong, thanks to the McKinley and the 
Dingley tariffs, with the result that 60. 6f/ 
per cent, of our total exports now go to 
Great Britain against 52.91 in 1890, while 
the proportion to the United States is only 
30.66, As to our export trade to the 
countries within the Empire, in 1896 it was 
$71,109,278 and in 1900 it was $114,781,- 
217. Our export, trade to the United 
States for the two periods was $34,400,428 
and $54,501,394 respectively. 

If the United States offers us a fair reci- 
procity tariff business commonsense de- 
mands that we at least give it careful con- 
sideration. But, as Hon. George Brown 
said in 1865, when the question of renewing 
the reciprocity treaty with the United 
States was being considered, "It is the 
place of the Americans to approach us with 
a proposition." Public sentiment in Can- 
ada would not countenance for one moment 
the initiative being taken by our states- 
men. 



CANADA'S FOREIGN TRADE. 

Canada's foreign trade during the past 
ten years has increased over 80 per cent. 
This is shown by the undevised official re- 
turns just issued for the fiscal year ending 
June 30 last, the figures being $394,000,000 
for 1901 and $218,384,934 for 1891. 

The growth is all the more significant 
when it is remembered that during the 
previous decade it was scarcely 8 per cent. 

There is an increase over 1900 in both 
exports and imports. The exports last 
year of goods, the produce of Canada, were 
$170,642,369, and this year, according to 
the unrevised statement, they were $177,- 
639,192. 

The growth of the export trade is one of 
the most striking in the commercial history 
of the country, it having, during the last 
ten years, doubled. 

The exports during 1901 compared with 
189] were as follows : 

1901. 1891. 

Mine §39.982,573 85,784.143 

Fisheries 10,720,352 9,715,401 

Forest 30,003,857 24,282,015 

Animalsand the : r produce 55,499,527 25,967,741 

Agricultural products.... 24,977,662 13,666,855 

Manufactures 16,012,502 6,296,249 

Miscellaneous 44,642 45,337 

Coin and bullion 398,077 129,328 

Total $177,639,192 $88,801,066 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



TRADE IN COUNTRIES OTHER THAN OUR OWN. 



SOUTHERN IRON PRODUCTION. 

A despatch from Birmingham, Ala., says: 
" A summary of monthly shipments made 
by The Southern Iron Companv shows thai 
for the first six months of this year the 
shipments of pig iron from Alabama and 
Tennessee aggregated 760,903 tons, an 
increase over the same period last year of 
71 ,395 tons. Pig iron shipments during' tile 
same period from the Birmingham district 
were 420,879 tons, a decrease of 5.1)37 tons. 
^Exports of pig' iron were 18,974 tons, a de- 
crease from last year of 13. 555 tons. The 
falling off in export shipments is accounted 
for by the splendid state of the domestic 
market the last part of last year and the 
first part of this year, when Alabama fur- 
naces hooked orders for domestic consump- 
tion which have carried them d, this time 
and will carry them for two months to 
come." 

BAR IRON IN THE UNITED STATES. 

The liar iron manufacturers who have been 
making concessions recently, on contracts 
involving both steel and iron, are now 
quoting $1 to $2 advance over their lowest 
figures. Demand is good, and there is 
much agricultural works tonnage yet to be 
placed.— Iron Trade Review. 

THE NAIL TRADE IN THE UNITED STATES. 

There is some demoralization noticeable 

in the wire and cut nail industry. 'While 
the cut nail manufacturers maintain an 
association it is reported that concessions 
from the price established the first of the 

nt Ji have been made and some of the in 

dependent manufacturers of wire nails have 
also mafic concessions to jobbers and con- 
sumers on long time contracts. The price of 
rods has also fallen to $34 ami S35 per 
ton. This was probabh due to the anx- 
iety of new rod manufacturers to secure 
business for their mills for the remainder 
of the year. The new factors in the rod 
business locally are Jones & Laughlins, 
Limited, and The Union Steel Company, 
The rod mill of the former was placed in 
operation several months ago while the Lit 
ter concern will commence to make deliveries 
next month. -Iron Trade Review. 

NEW YORK METAL MARKET. 

TIN — Prices on spot (in in London mar- 
ket again broke badly, the market cloteing 
at £1 under hist night's quotation, a de- 
cline of £11 in three days. The tone was 
weak and comparatively little tin changed 
hands. The market appears to bo sagging 
of its own weight. Three months' tin in 
London was also vw-ak and lower, closing at 
a decline of £1 10s. The New York mat 
Wi was reported to be very weak and un- 
settled, the bulls being unable apparently 
(o hold up prices in the face of dull trade 
and the depression in England. Spot was 
nominally quoted at 27.50c, but there were 



no buyers. For July the best bid was 
26.75c, while 26.90c. was asked. Twenty- 
five tons Augusl deliverv sold at "20. '25c. 
and that month was offered at 26.25c, with 
26c. bid. There were sellers of Septem- 
ber at 25.75c. of October at 25.50c, and 
November at 25.25c., but no buyers. 

COPPER— Officially prices are held at 
17c. for Lake Superior and 16 5-8c. for 
electrolytic and casting, but it is rumored 
that the little business in progress is being 
done at cut rates. The London market is 
still sagging and closed quiet at 2s. (id. un- 
der last night's price on spot and 3s. 9d. 
lower on futures, t lie latter having been 
quite active during the day. 

PIG LEAD— There is little doing in this 
market, but prices are maintained on the 
basis of 4.37 l-2c for lots of 511 tons or 
over. St. Louis was stead} at 1.27 1-2 to 
4.30c for soft Missouri and 1.35 to 4.40c. 
for chemical. There was no change in the 
London quotation. 

SPELTER— The market here remains dull 
and nominal at 3,. 0(1 to 3.05c St. Louis 
was firm at 3,85c. The London market 
was unchanged. 

REGULTJS ANTIMONY- Not much de- 
mand is noted, but the market remains 
steady at 8 1-2 to III l-lc. as to brand. 

OLD METALS— Trade is slow and prices 
more or less nominal. 

IRON— The movement in pig iron con- 
tinues light, except so far as regular con- 
tract deliveries are concerned. In Chicago, 
where for some time the demand has been 
active. business has been stopped by the 
moulders' strike. Steel billets, on account 
of the strike, are moving slowly, but are 
firm fur prompt delivery. Finished materi- 
als of all kinds are reported to be in fairly 
active demand, with the tendency of prices 
on hoops, cotton ties anil plates decidedly 
upward. 

TINPLATE Stock available for immedi- 
ate deliver} is exceedingly scarce aud com- 
mands a high premium. For special sizes 
§1.25 per box over official quotations was 
paid to-day. 



IMPROVEMENTS IN FIREARMS. 

IMPROVEMENTS and new features are 
always possible when the desir-C and 
ability to produce them are not lacking. 
To fully appreciate (his fact, one has only 
to note the improvements and new features 
that appear, from time to time, in The [ver 
.Johnson guns and revolvers. All that is 
latest and best in this line can always be 
found in this popular product. 

A recent and distinct feature of their 
single gun which is attracting wide atten- 
tion is the simple' mechanism that makes 
their gun either automatic ejector or non- 
ejector in action, at the option of user. 

It is controlled by a small set-screw 
located in the barrel lug, which, when left 
tightly screwed in its place, makes the gun 



a non-ejector, an action which is preferred 
when brass shells are utilized. 

If automatic-ejector action is wanted, this 
small set-screw is turned to the left, until 
its head becomes flush with the barrel Rig. 
This action is desirable when paper shells 
an- used. 

Features of this kind arc not only appre 
ciated by the sportsmen, but they give The 
l\er Johnson product, a distinct individual- 
ity. This, together with the fact (hat the 
concern constantly adheres to the conviction 
(hat the best only is worthy of the name of 
[ver Johnson, has attracted (o their pro- 
duct a reputation that is worldwide in 
extent. 



COPPER OUTPUT AND DEMAND. 

THE meeting of the Copper Producers' 
Association in New York last week 
served to draw attention to the con- 
dition of the copper market, and to furnish 
figures regarding the production and the 
consumption in the United States which 
establish a basis for anticipating the prob- 
able supply and demand for the near future. 

During the past eight years the world's 
production of copper has increased from 
303,530 long tons to 484 852 long tons, but 
the demand has increased in even greater 
proportion. 

During the first six months of 1901 the 
production in the United States was 133,- 
394 tons, as compared with 133,577 tons 
during the same period in 1900. From the 
figures to hand, Secretary Stanton reaches 
the conclusion that the production in the 
United States during the next year will be 
fully as large, if not larger than during the 
past year, for, while some mines are produc- 
ing much less than formerly, several mines, 
which have been developed for about three 
years, are expected to start producing 
during the next few months. 

Meanwhile the consumption has been 
steadily maintained. The exports from the 
United States fell during the six months' 
period from 90,279 tons to 50,024 tons. 
This serious falling off is attributed largely 
to the industrial depression in Germany, 
and had it not been for the good domestic 
demand it is probable that prices would 
have been forced downward, whereas the 
steady demand at home has maintained 
prices since January at about 17c, the 
figures never getting below 16c. It is 
thought that the continuance of present 
prices depends largely on the export 
demand. If it continues to decline it is 
questionable whether the United States 
market can continue to absorb the big pro- 
duction which is looked for. If, on the 
other hand, the export trade resumes its 
former magnitude, prices are likely to go 
even higher than at present expected. 



10 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



A CORNER FOR CLERKS. 



BY W.T.R. 



AN EARLY-CLOSING DIFFICULTY. 



DW. C. tells me of the futile efforts 
to have an early-closing by-law 
« carried in his town. He also 
urges the need of organization among the 
clerks of the Province of Ontario under -a 
central head at Toronto, with local branches 
in every town of over 1,000 population, to 
have as its object, the elevation and instruc- 
tion of clerks in their calling and to deal 
with all matters pertaining to their work. 
He wants to know if I consider such an 
organization feasible. 

Under the existing conditions such an 
organization or union, properly managed, 
would be of great benefit and reflect credit 
upon the clerks themselves, for nowadays 
organization is regarded as a sign of intelli- 
gence. In such a union the members 
would have the hearty approval and co- 
operation of the merchants in their efforts 
to increase their efficiency in the art of 
selling goods, their knowledge of the goods 
they sell, the discussion of new prepara- 
tions, constantly being placed upon the 
market, and all the other matters pertain- 
ing to the clerks themselves. This would 
draw those in similar lines together. Once 
they had met, their mutual interests would 
keep them together. It would be neces- 
sary to have different sections ; one for each 
of the trades, with a general board of 
management. To my mind much good 
would result, the members being benefited 
many times above the mere cost of mem- 
bership. I would have three degrees, the 
apprentice, active membership, and retired, 
with the allotted privileges for each, all 
working together for the betterment of con- 
ditions, the protection and elevation of their 
different trades. I have often wondered 
that such an organization was not started 
long ago, and yet why should one wonder 
when you see, even at the present day, how 
merchants regard each other ? But a better 
feeling is growing and 1 am also sure there 
is a "brighter day coming" for the clerk. 
Let us all do our part to help it along. 
There is cause and work for a general 
clerks' association as much so as the num- 
ber of other similar organizations through- 
out the world, and to my mind it is only a 
question of time before this need will be 
supplied. 

In regard to the early-closing by-law. I 
am not troubled regarding legislation on 
this subject. Merchants themselves have 
found out that long hours do not mean 
more profits. The additional trade received 
after a reasonable hour does not pay for the 
cost of keeping open. Consequently this 
thing is righting itself all over the land, 
and it will do so in your town before long. 
I have enjoyed your letter and will be 
pleased to hear from you again. 

A QUESTION OF CREDITS. 

"J. E. R.''" writes me a letter on business 
management. He is doing a good trade 
but has insufficient capital to do a large 
credit business, which he regards as a 
drawback. He wants to know about the 
coupon book system of giving credit, and 
asks also about advertising. 

The very fact of your capital being small 
is your safeguard. I would want to do as 
little credit business as possible, for I 
regard a small country town as nearly 
impossible to do a strictly cash business 
and get your share of the trade. It is 
possible to so conduct your business in 
giving credit that the amount of your 



capital locked up in your books need not 
be large. The one important department 
a merchant must constantly watch is his 
customers' accounts. When a man asks 
for credit, you question him regarding his 
occupation, how often and at what time he 
will pay his account ? Then mark on 
your book his statement and about the 
amount you think him safe. Have his bill 
made out and if lie does not pay up when 
agreed find out the cause, and do not 
hesitate to stop the account if you have 
doubts regarding his honesty. Look after 
your books frequently. Take note of those 
overdue. Then get after them. Remember 
the average mechanic can pay a small 
account easier than a large one. Therefore 
collect as often as you can. Don't be 
afraid to tell a man of whom you have had 
a bad report that he must pay cash. He 
will respect you for it, and you will in all 
probability get his cash trade. When you 
have given him reasonable time to pay give 



THE LATEST "YANKEE" TOOL. 

The accompanying cut is an illustration 
of the latest tool from the factory of The 
North Bros. Manufacturing Co., Philadel- 
phia. It is known as the "Yankee" 
Ratchet Screw Driver No. 12, and is made 
for special use of gunsmiths, fitters, elec- 
tricians and mechanics requiring a strong, 
substantial screw driver with a short stub 
blade. The adjustment for right and left 
hand is made by pushing the shifter to 
opposite ends of the slot ; when the shifter 
is placed midway in the slot, the blade if 
held rigid, as in an ordinary screw driver. 
The adjustment, being across instead of in 
line with the blade, avoids any possibility 
of changing the shifter while in use. The 
materials and workmanship in every detail 
are of the same superior quality found in 
other " Yankee" tools. It is made in one 




him fair warning you intend to sue and 
get judgment if he fails to heed the warn- 
ing. Place the account in court and try 
all legal methods. Always be agreeable 
and make it easy for a man to do business 
with you if he so desires. Avoid wordB and 
trouble and be a gentleman under all cir- 
cumstances. The coupon book saves book- 
keeping and also limits the account. These 
are strong features in its favor. 

RETAIL ADVERTISING. 

Regarding advertising. This is a broad 
question and one each merchant has to set- 
tle for himself. " Does advertising pay ?" 
is no longer asked. The right kind of 
advertising always pays. Every successful 
merchant will tell you so, but a man must 
study his advertising to increase his busi- 
ness and spend the money judiciously along 
proper lines, avoiding the wild schemes of 
fakers, noting, expecting, and getting 
results for his expenditure, Give it 
thought. Plan, arrange and systematically 
advertise through your best mediums, and 
increased business will certainly follow. 

" B. M." writes : You said you had more 
merchants write you than clerks. Well, I have my 
own store and I am as much a clerk as I ever was, 
only I don't get my wages every Saturday night as 
I used to do. I hope this will not exclude me 
from your " corner." 

Oh, no ! I think you will qualify even if 
you are not paid regularly. You might 
send us a few lines on " The man who is 
his own clerk." 

PHCENIX, B.C., CLERKS. 

The Phoenix Clerks' Union have elected 

the following officers for the ensuing term : 

President — Geo. S. McKenzie. 
Vice-President— A. S. Williamson. 
Secretary — Bert Detcher. 
Treasurer — J. L. Williams. 
Guard — Henry B. Schooley. 

The union is reported to be in a flourish- 
ing condition. 



size only : Blade, 5-16 in. in diameter and 
I y% in. long ; entire length of screw driver, 
5^ in. Packed one-half dozen in strong 
paper box. 



"NOVEL" MOTOR TRACTION ENGINE 

Under this caption foreign technical 
journals describe an oil engine said to have 
been recently invented in Germany, but 
which, as regards type and general action, 
was first brought out in this country by 
the late Richard Dudgeon. Some of the 
details of the German engine may vary from 
that of Mr. Dudgeon's, and the agent em- 
ployed as motive power — oil vapor — is differ- 
ent from the latter, for he used steam ; 
but the system was devised forty years ago, 
and the writer saw it in action in this city, 
with Dudgeon driving it. The motor in 
question consists of a friction roller, or 
pinion, working on the inside of a larger 
wheel, such as a locomotive tire, for in- 
stance. The tiretread runs directly on the 
road and suitable framing is provided to 
carry the engine. The device itself proved 
very successful as to tractive power com- 
pared with other methods, the advantage 
being given as CO per cent, in its favor. — 
Scientific American. 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 



WIRE 



Prompt Shipment! 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited 
HAMILTON, ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



9 



^ryurrCf^ 



A PORT ARTHUR HARDWARE STORE 

SOME 15 or 16 years ago a hardware, 
tinware and plumbing business was 
started in Tort Arthur, Ont., by 
Wells & Emmerson. The country was 

young and the population sparse, and the 
obstacles in the way of success were numer- 
ous. But the members of the firm had 
faith in the West and confidence in their 
ability, and gradually they began to forge 
ahead, until Wells & Emmerson is to-day 
numbered among' the leading- firms in the 
West. 

Lately they have erected a new business 

block and occupied it, and travellers say it 

^-. the best hardware store west of Toronto. 

The building is situated at the corner of 
Lome and Cumberland streets and is built 
of Vertc Island sand stone and buff pressed 
brick, with window ledges and columns of 
Portage Entry red sand stone. The cornice 
is made of galvanized iron designed bv Mr. 
Emmerson and manufactured in their own 
shop. Steel girders support the upper 
storey, with the floor of the ground floor 
rests upon heavy wood joists set close to- 
gether. Throughout the floors arc of first 
quality maple. The hallway leading to the 
upper- flat is tiled, as are also the floors 
and walls of the lavatories. In the upper 
flat there are five office suites of two rooms 
each. These offices are finished in natural 
wood, polished, and are the finest and best 
appointed in the town. This is evidenced 
by the fact that while there arc plenty of 
offices of the ordinary class vacant every 
one in the Emmerson block was rented be- 
fore completion. The building is heated 
throughout with hot water and an Erickson 
hot -ail- pump supplies water to the lavator- 
ies and other portions of the building. The 
basement in which the pump and heating 
plant is located is lighted with Luxfer and 
I'efav prism glass. 

The entrance to the door is beautifully 
tiled with Mosaic tiling showing the firm's 
name. 

But it is inside that the utility of the 
store, from a. business viewpoint, outclasses 
an\ other store in that part of the country. 
The shelving is known as the Warren 
Patent Glass Front Cabinet Sectional Shelv- 
ing, and was selected by Mr. Emmerson 
from the manufacturers in Chicago, and is 
the first fittings of this kind ever put in a 
store in Canada. It is of the interchange- 
able kind so that any part of the shelving 
can be taken out and transferred to another 
part of the store, and every part fits. 

The private offices are at the rear of the 
store of which they command a full view. 
The finishing is in natural oak, polished 
and furnished with modern office requisites. 
The store is 34 x 87 feet in size. The 
ceiling is of metal, painted white, blending 
into a blue tint. 

Mr. J. T. Emmerson, the working part- 
ner, is an energetic and keen business man. 
Mr. Wells resides in Winnipeg. 

Besides doing a large hardware trade 
( wholesale and retail ), they handle all 
kinds of mining and lumbering supplies, 
ship chandlery, tinware, and have a plumb- 
ing and steamfitting department. 



PROSPEROUS INVENTORS. 

" There isn't much money in inventions," 
vsaid the young man with long hair and a 
thoughtful manner. 

" That's nonsense ! " answered Senator 
Sorghum. " Look at the men who invent- 
ed trusts and watered stock. The trouble 
is that you don't invent the right thing." 





H For jo Years 



we have been giving all our thought and attention to these 
two things : How to make the best paint, and how to sell it. 

We've not wasted any of that time in trying to make 
goods that could sell at a lower price than that which the 
best goods bring. 

We know that the best paint sells best. If we had work- 
ed on the "cheap" paint plan we could not have won the 
success that is ours, and we couldn't be looking forward 
to still greater things. 

It has paid us to stick unswervingly to the best paint — 
and it will pay you, too. 

Write for our booklet, "The Sherwin-Williams Paints: 
What they are, and how they're sold." Free for the asking. 







The Sherwin-Williams Co. 



CHICAGO, 
NEW YORK, 



PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 

CLEVELAND. 
NEWARK, BOSTON, SAN FRANCISCO. 

MONTREAL, TORONTO, KANSAS CITY 



THE COURSE OF PRICES. 

Prices of staple products in England 
reached their highest point fifteen months 
ago, and since then the tendency has, with 
a few temporary checks, been downward. 
As in this country, the decline of late has 
been very gradual because of recoveries in 
certain commodities, but the net result has 
been to bring The London Economist's 
index number to the lowest point touched 
since March, 1 896. The following state- 
ment shows the total index number of inter- 
val's since the end of 1897 : 

Total index 
End of number. 

June, 1901 2,007 

March, 1901 2,018 

December, 1900 2,125 

September, 1900 2,235 

June, 1900 2,211 

March, 1900 2,240 

December, 1899 2,145 

September, 1899 2,085 

June, 1899 2,028 

March, 1899 L973 

December, 1898 1 ,91 8 

December, 1897 1,890 

The present index number, it will be seen, 
is 5.5 per cent, lower than on January 1 
and 9.2 per cent, lower than a year ago, 
while 10.4 per cent, lower than the top 
reached in March, 1900. It is to be noted 
in this connection that American prices, as 
shown by Bradstreet's index number, have 
reacted to nearly the same extent from the 
high point of the 1900 boom. Examination 
of the detailed prices shows that metals, 
while lower in price than at the end of 
June in the last two years, yet remain 



higher than the prices at this time in 1898 
and 1897. Cotton, though not so high as 
it has been, is much above the average of 
recent years, and the same is true of other 
textiles, such as jute, flax and hemp, while 
wool has reached almost the lowest on 
record. Wheat, meat and articles of con- 
sumption generally are about at normal 
quotations.— Bradstreet's. 



TRADE CHAT. 



During the year ending June 30, 1901, 
there were smelted in Canada 43(i.708 tons 
of silver ore. 

The machine shop of St. .John & Black, 
St. Catharines, Ont., has suffered $600 
damage by fire. 

It is reported that a bed of coal has been 
discovered in the Porcupine Bills, near 
Swan River, Man. 

An iron foundry and artillery workshop 
are to be erected in Quebec in connection 
with the Dominion arsenal there. 

A new steel screw- steamer, the Midland 
Queen, has been built to run out of Mid- 
land, Ont., with passengers and freight. 

Temple & Maguire, hardware dealers, 
Elgin, Man., have attracted much attention 
to their window lately by showing a small 
acetylene gas generator at work. 

The Ontario Portland Cement Co., Lim- 
ited, Brantford, Ont., has been incorporated 
with $450. 000 capital and the following 
officers : President — E. L. Gould ; Vice- 
President — W. S. Wisner ; Secretary, E. 
Taylor. Directors — H. Cockshutt, A. Bixel, 
W. G. Elliott and the president and vice- 
president. 



12 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



INQUIRIES REGARDING CANADIAN 
TRADE. 

Mr. Harrison Watson, curator of the 
Canadian Section of the Imperial Institute, 
London, England, is in receipt of the follow- 
ing inquiries regarding Canadian trade : 

i. A London firm desires to be placed in com- 
munication with Canadian shippers of beans and 
peas. 

2. The manufacturers of brick-making machinery 
seek the services of an active Canadian resident 
agent to introduce their goods. 

3. A north country house asks for names of 
Canadian shippers of scrap and old metals. 

4. An old-established manufacturer of carbonic 
papers and other stationery supplies would like to 
establish some trade in Canada. 

The following were among the recent 
inquiries relating to Canadian trade 
received at the High Commissioner's office 
in London, England : 

5. The proprietors of several kinds of steep 
remedies, sheep dips, etc., ask to be referred to 
some Canadian firms with good connections among 
sheep farmers in the Dominion who would act as 
their agents. 

6. A London firm who contemplates doing a 
freight business between Cape Breton and the 
United Kingdom, desire to get into communication 
with firms there requiring representation in Great 
Britain. 

7. Inquiry is made for firms in Canada, of good 
standing, who require a commission house to act as 
agents for any kind of Canadian product and to 
look after their interests in London. 

8. A Glasgow house ask for the names of a few 
exporters of Ontario hay in pressed bales. 

9. A wholesale and export firm of stationers, 
booksellers, etc., desire to communicate with Cana- 
dian buyers of books, stationery, toys, confection- 
ery, druggists' sundries, etc. 

10. Inquiry is made for names of manufacturers 
tn Canada of iron and steel work, cast and wrought 
iron piping, steel plates, steel angles, etc. 

11. A well-known firm of stationers in London 
are open to take up the agency for England for 
any Canadian speciality in their line of business. 

12. The names of Canadian exporters of cheese- 
box wood and hoops for barrels are asked for. 

13. A Manchester firm ask for the addresses of 
Canadian paper mills supplying " news." 

[The names of the firms or individuals 
making the above inquiries will be fur- 
nished on application to the Editor of 
Hardware and Metal.] 



INCREASE SHIPPING 
A statement giving the number of sea- 
going vessels arriving in the port of Mont- 
real from the opening of navigation up to 
July 1 shows a considerable increase over 
the corresponding period of last year. 

In the year 1899 from the opening of 
navigation to July 1, the sea-going tonnage 
arriving in the port amounted to 284,000 
tons. This was considerably higher than 
the corresponding period in 1898, and 
nearly 60,000 tons in excess of the same 
period in 1900. The present season, how- 



ever, is a full 10,000 tons higher than 1899. 
The statement giving the years, number 
of ships and tonnage is.as follows : 

Years. Ships. Tonnage. 

1898 257 476,000 

1899 2 39 484,000 

1900 203 413000 

1901 252 494,000 



PERSONAL MENTION. 

Mr. M. F. Irwin, sales manager of the 
McClary Manufacturing Company, of 
London, Ont., is taking a couple of weeks 
of well- deserved holidays. During his 
vacation Mr. Irwin will visit Toronto, the 
Pan American, and other points. 






you bo; THE IVER JOHNSON Top Snap Single Gin 



P 



YOU GET A GUN THAT IS 



D 



OSITIVE, L/URABLE, 







UICK 



No better is made, $0 no better can be bought. Automatic Ejector or Non-Ejector 

(At option of user.) 




Improved 1901 Model— 12 and 16 Gauge— 30 and 32-inch Barrel. 



Sold Everywhere by Leading Dealers. 



Send for Catalogue. 



Iver Johnson's Arms & Cycle Works, 



Branches— New York— 99 Chambers St. ■ 
Boston— 165 Washington St. 
Worcester— 364 Main St. - 



FITCHBURG, Mass. 




BOECKH'S BRUSHES 

are good brushes. 
WHY THEY ARE GOOD 

Because we spare no expense to keep the quality up to 
the highest standard, and they have gained a reputation that 
has created a demand from the Atlantic to the Pacific. 

It pays to handle them, as they never fail to please the 
customer. 



BOECKH BROS. & COMPANY 

TORONTO. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



13 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO. 

37-39 Front Street /Wesj/)*ForontO. 
^ ' PQWDERS. 



ONLY 
WHOLESALE 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY 



Rifle Cartridge Powder 




FFFG FF.G 



"DEAD SHOT" 




Metal kegs, 25-lbs. each. 



n§ 




1§ 


'$*M&* 




s&B&Emt 


^se***& 




^|SS§5 


4%&% 




; $?W 



4 3 

Size 3 — 6j<-lb. kegs, $5.00 
4— 6^-lb. " s.oo 



Smith's Electric Blasting Apparatus. 



Platinum Fuse. 



Batteries — 

Leading Wires (500 feet coils) 

Connecting Wires — 

Platinum Fuse, 4 feet wires. 



Schultze 

Smokeless 




Best Hard Grain 
White Powder Made. 



Canadian 

Powders. 




FF. Trap Shooting. 

FFF. Canadian Rifle. 

Snapshot. Blasting Powders. 

Northwest Rifle. A and B. 

Ducking. Cariboo. 



Showing the Exterior of Batteries. Showing the Interior of Batteries. 

H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., Toronto. 

Graham Wire and Got Nails are the Best, 



WE SHIP 

PROMPTLY 



OUR PRICES 

ARE RIGHT 



Factory: Dufferln Street, Toronto. 



14 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES. ASSIGNMENTS, COM- 
PROMISES. 

E FORREST & CO., general mer- 
chants, Ste. Anne de Beaupre, 
t Que., have compromised at 30c. on 
the dollar. 

X. Harvey, general merchant, St. 
Hiliaron, Que., has assigned. 

L. A. .Jalbert, general merchant, Griffin's 
Cove, Que., lias compromised. 

J. C. tjagnon, general merchant, St. 
Flavie Station, Que., has assigned. 

Henry Head, general merchant, Cloyne, 
Out., has assigned to James Yule, 

George Roy, general merchant, Berthier, 
Que., is offering 50c. on the dollar. 

E. Soucy, general merchant, Himouski, 
Que., is offering 30c. on the dollar. 

Barney Stoffel, carriagemakcr. etc., Sim- 
roe, Out., lias assigned to A. B. Greer. 

F. C. Peck, general merchant, .leannette's 
Creek, Out., has assigned to G. W. Sul- 
man. 

Harry J. Bennett, carriagemaker, Ganan- 
oque, Out., has assigned to Josephus T. 
Green. 

Assignment has been demanded of J. C, 
Gagnon, general merchant, St. Flavie Sta- 
tion, Que. 

A compromise' has been effected by David 
Tobin, genera] merchant, Sacre-Coeur de 
Marie, Que. 

.1. B. Douville & Co., general merchants. 
St. Stanislas, Que., have compromised at 
25 cents on the dollar. 

A. McCormack, general merchant. Sydney, 
N.S., has assigned, and a meeting of his 
creditors has been held. 

(). St. -Jean, hardware dealer. Montreal, 
has assigned, and his assets are advertised 
I'm' sale on the 30th inst. 

A meeting of the creditors of W. A. 
Damude tV Co., dealers in agricultural im- 
plements, St. Catharines, Out., has been 
held. 

A meet i ne of the creditors of George 
Tucke iV. Co.. dealers in asbestos, etc., 
Montreal, has been called for to-day ( Sat- 
urday j. 

Jennie Walker, general merchant. Chelms- 
ford, Ont., has assigned to J. D. Walker, 
Sudbury, and a meeting of her creditors 
will be held on August 3. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND 
DISSOLVED. 

McKinley & Son, general merchants, 
Seeley's Bay, Ont., have dissolved. 

McKay & McNab, general merchants, 
Welsford, N.S., have dissolved ; H. McNab 
continues. 

C. B. Hoey, general merchant,, Ninga, 
Man., has admitted Arch. Robertson to 
partnership. 

Co-partnership has been registered by 
Wm. Young and Itobt. Newton, under the 
style of Young & Newton, general mer- 
chants, Bridgeport, N.S. 

T. L. Dodge & Co., hardware dealers, 
etc., Kentville, N.S.. have dissolved. K. 
L. Dodge continues the hardware business 
and E. H. Dodge the furniture business of 
the old firm. 

SALES MADE AND PENDING. 

H. Ruth, blacksmith. Lakelet. Out., is 
about to sell out. 

The assets of Hector Leblanc, hardware 
dealer. Hull. Que., have been sold. 



The stock of Shepherd & Co.. painters, 
etc., Ottawa, Ont., has been sold. 

Charles Bazett, general merchant, Dun- 
cans, B.C., is offering to sell out. 

James Young, general merchant, Nanaimo, 
B.C., is offering to give up business. 

The assets of V. ;Taillefer, general mer- 
chant, Hawkesbury, ..Ont,, have been sold. 

James Calloway, foufTdyjrrian, etc., Cvee- 
more, Ont., is advertising his 'business, for 
sale. i. 

The assets of Geo. Charette, general mer- 
chant, Ste. Marie de Blandford, have been 
sold. 

The assets of the estate of J. M. Phil- 
lips, stove dealer, etc., Morris, Man., have 
been sold. 

The stock of McDougall <fc Co., general 
merchants, Renfrew, Ont., is advertised for 
sale under power of chattel mortgage. 

The stock of P. H. Christman & Co.. 
genera] merchants, Fordwich, Ont., has been 
sold to H. W. Cartel- at 70c. on the dollar. 

Laking, Moore & Connell, general mer- 
chants, etc., Hawkestone, Ont.. are adver- 
tising their general store business for sale. 

The stock, etc., of the estate of Seli, 
Black & Co., general merchants. Walkertoi'i 
and Southampton, Ont., has been sold bv 
auction. 

CHANGES. 

0. Par] & Cie. have registered as black- 
smiths, in Quebec. 

Thibault & Co., have registered as paint- 
ers, etc., Montreal, Que. 

John Quesnell, blacksmith, Deloraine 

Man., has sold out to E. Stoven. 

The Moncton Harness Co., Moncton, N.B 
have sold out to Henry A. Chandler. 

The Hamilton, Out., Tool and Optical 
Co., Limited, have been incorporated. 

Sneath & Co., general merchants. Elm- 
vale, Ont,, have sold out to Vair, Vickers & 
Co. 

Richard Common, general merchant, New- 
bridge, Out., has sold out to Ernest Pritch- 
ard. 

George Porter, general merchant, BJue- 
vale, Ont., has sold out to Robert Mal- 
lougJi. 

C. \V. Fisher, general merchant, Cochrane, 
Man., has been succeeded by Fisher „t 
Malone. 

The Ontario Portland Cement Company, 
Limited, Brantford, Ont., have been incor- 
porated. 

J. B. Lawrence, general merchant, Bar- 
rington, N.S., has sold his branch store to 
E. C. Hogg. 

DEATHS. 

Albert LeBlanc, general merchant, Carle- 
ton, Que., is dead. 

Mrs. T. F. Moore, of T. F. Moore & Co., 
coal and wood dealers, Montreal, is dead. 

John (i. Bowes, of Bowes, Jamieson & 
Co., stove manufacturers; Hamilton, (Int.. 
is dead. 



DELEGATES TO THE MARITIME 
BOARD OF TRADE. 

At its last annual meeting the Kentville 
Board of Trade appointed the following as 
delegates to the annual convention of the 
Maritime Board of Trade, which opens at 
Chatham, N.B., on August 21 Messrs. 
K. Sutherland, Judge Chipman, E. B. 
Newcombe, T. P. Calkin, S. S. Strong, H. 
M. Bain. W. P. Shaffner, President Sealv, 
C. L. Dodge, Mayor Yould, R. W. Eaton 
and M. (i. de Wolfe. 



LIQUID 
COACH 
COLORS 



The dry pigments composing the base 
of these Colors are manufactured by our- 
selves, and are ground by highly 
finished Machinery in our Pale, 
Hard-Drying Coach Varnish. 

They have been put to the most severe 
tests, and are warranted^ not to crack, 
creep, pit or fade under the most severe 
climatic changes. 



Ornamental Work 



of all kinds, Indoor and Outdoor, may 
be performed byusing these fine varnish 
Colors. 

They dry hard 
with a rich gloss, 

and, being ready for use, may be taken 
advantage of by all lovers of beauty to 
brighten up household and other articles. 

PUT UP IN TINS, ASSORTED SIZES, 
NOS. I, 2 AND 3. 

OTTR 

LIQUID COACH COLORS 

are sold by all 

Reliable Paint and Oil Dealers. 



THE 



CANADA 

PAINT 

COMPANY 

LIMITED 

Montreal and Toronto 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



15 



CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

OPAL WARE. 

ONE of the most artistic catalogues of 
the year has just been issued by 
Gowans, Kent & Co., Toronto. 
This work is devoted exclusively to one 
line, "Opal Ware," for the season 1901- 
1902. It contains over 250 superb illus- 
trations of the dainty patterns in pin, comb 
and brush trays, jewel, hairpin, trinket, 
Don-bon, puff, scrap, cuff, collar, handker- 
chief and glove boxes, vases, fern dishes, 
bowls, plates, smoker sets, toilet bottles, 



placques, candlesticks, cracker jars, mugs, 
tumblers, jugs, cream and sugar bowls, salt 
and pepper shakers, etc. The range of 
quality and design is so great and the illus- 
trations of the patterns are so excellent that 
every dealer in chinaware should easily 
make a selection suitable for the retail 
trade, for the goods are so dainty and 
attractive that they add to the appearance of 
a retailer's stock, and they are so moderate 
in price that there can be made an excellent 
demand for them. Dealers who have not 
yet secured a copy of this catalogue can get 
one by writing to Gowans, Kent & Co., 
Toronto. 



A BRILLIANT HANGER. 

One of the best hangers of the season has 
just been issued by the Gurney Foundry 
Co., Limited. The design, which is hand- 
somely lithographed, has as its central 
figure a pretty young cook coming from an 
" Imperial Oxford " range with a plump 
turkey which has been cooked so perfectly 
that the cook is radiant with satisfaction. 
The range, though in the background, 
makes a conspicuous figure, and shows its 
fine points to excellent advantages. The 
hanger is bound to prove a popular one. 
They can be had by writing the Gurney 
Foundry Co., Toronto. 




JAS B. CAMPBELL. 



WILLIAM PRATT. 



THE ACME CAN WORKS 

Manufacturers of 

Paint and Color Cans, round and square* Varnish 

and Oil Cans* Paint Irons* Paint 

Packages* Lye Tins, 

and every description of Tin or can required by the trade. Write us for 
anything you need in our line. We will be pleased to quote you prices. 



OFFICE AND FACTORY 

Ontario St. and Jeanne D'Arc Avenue, 



MONTREAL 



i«P'*rjs>*» ; \M, 




Here 
is 



AP 



OINTER 



If in doubt as to where you 

can obtain the Best Grades 
of 



Hachinery Oils 



Write us. We have the only kind that makes the 

wheels go round. 



Jarvis and Esplanade Streets. 




16 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




QUEBEC MARKETS 

Montreal, July 26, 1901. 
HARDWARE. 

THIS year's midsummer business has 
been decidedly encouraging, the mail 
orders totalling' well above those of 
last season. The demand for wires still con- 
tinues to some extent, but it. is of course 
not now heavy. Wire nails are none too 
plentiful yet, 1ml the famine seems to be 
well relieved. Horseshoes and horsenails 

are beginning to move out. in fair quanti- 
ties. Screens of all kinds have been ex- 
ceedingly brisk again this week, while 
other hot-weather goods continue in mode- 
rate request. Screws, bolts and rivets are 
being shipped in good quantities while bin- 
der twine is moving forward freely. Travel- 
lers have been in the city this week repre- 
senting American manufacturers and they 
bring a report that the demand is ver\ 
brisk on the other side and that goods will 
be scarce this fall. None of them have ad- 
vanced prices as yet, while in a few cases 
perhaps they are even lower than last year. 
The steel strike in the States has had a 
bullish effect, upon the English sheet metal 
market. There has been a very heavy de- 
mand for paris green from the Maritime 
Provinces during the past ten days. 

BAPB WIRE— There is still a moderate 
demand for barb wire, but the heavy busi- 



ness has been done. It is said that The 
American Steel and Wire Company has been 
selling wire to Maritime ports this spring 
at. a delivered cost of 5 to 10c. below the 
Pittsburg or Cleveland values quoted to 
Montreal houses. Prices here are unchanged 
at 33.05 per 100 lb. f.o.b. Montreal. 

OALYANIZPD W IRK - Some shipments 
are being made in galvanized wire. but 
business is no longer brisk. We quote as 
follows : No. 5, $4.25 ; Nos. (i, 7 and S 
gauge. §3.55; No. 9, $3.10; No. 10. $3.75: 
No, II, $3.85; No. 12, $3.25; No. 13, 
13.35 ; No. 14. $4.25 ; No. 15, $4.75 ; No. 
10, $5. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE— Manufacturers 

still report, some business doing at old 
figures. We quote oiled and an- 

nealed as follows : No. 9. $2.80 ; No. 10, 
§2.87; No. 11, $2.90; No. 12, $2.95; No. 13, 
$3.15 per 100 lb. f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, 
Hamilton, London, St. John and Halifax. 

FINK STEEL WJRE— There is no change 
to report. The discount is unchanged at 

17 1-2 per cent. 

BRASS AND COPPER WIRE - The 

ordinary steady demand is reported. The 
discounts are 55 and 2 1-2 per cent, on 
brass, and 50 and 2 1-2 per cent, on cop 
per. 

FENCE STAPLPS-The aggregate of 
business is not large. We quote $3.25 for 



blight and $3.75 for galvanized per keg 
of 100 lb. 

WIRE NAILS— A satisfactory trade is 
being done in wire nails, some houses still 
being short of I 1-2 inch. It is likely 
that supplies will not be wanting next 
week. We quote $2.85 for small lots and 
$2.77 1-2 for carlots, f.o.b. Montreal, Lon-^ 
don, Toronto, Hamilton and Gananoque. 

CI T NAILS— Small lots are moving for- 
ward regularly, although business in this 
line is not brisk. We quote $2.45 for small 
and $2.35 for carlots ; flour barrel nails 25 
per cent, discount ; coopers' nails, 30 per 
cent, discount. 

HORSE NAILS-Trade in horse nails is 
beginning to open up, but as dealers have 
laid in stocks, movements from first hands 
are not likely to lie brisk for some time yet. 
The discounts aic unchanged. "('" brand is 
held at a discount of 50 and 7 1-2 per cent, 
off the new list. "W brand is quoted at 60 
per cent, off old list on oval and city head. 
and 66 2-3 per cent, off countersunk head. 
Monarch's discount is 6(5 2-3 per cent., and 
70 per cent, in 25-box lots. 

HORSESHOES— There have been quite a 
number of inquiries received this week and 
also a fair quota of sales. We quote : 
Iron shoes, light and medium pattern, No. 
2 and larger, $3.50 ; No. 1 and smaller. 
$3.75 ; snow shoes, No. 2 and larger, $3.75; 
No. I and smaller, $4 ; X L steel shoes, all 



4 riETALS b 

$ > 



We have always on hand a heavy stock of 
metals in every gauge and size, and can there- 
fore give prompt shipment. 

You may require some of these : 

Galvanized Sheets, flat and corrugated 

Black Sheets 

Canada Plates 

Tin Plates 

Tinned Sheets 

Terne Plates 

Copper Sheets 

Ingot Tin. 



o 



We will be pleased to answer inquiries for 
both import and from stock. 

We make or carry "Everything for the 
Tinshop." 

By consolidating your account with us you 
get many advantages which one-line manu- 
facturers cannot afford to give. 



M 



M 



LONDON, 



TORONTO, 



MONTREAL, 



WINNIPEG, 



VANCOUVER 



AND 



ST. JOHN, N.B. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



17 



THE PAGE-HERSEY 

IRON & TUBE GO. 



Limited 



Montreal 

Man ufacturers of j 

Wrought Iron Pipe 

For Water, Gas, Steam, Oil, 
Ammonia and Machinery. 



DRAIN PIPES, 
PORTLAND CEMENTS, 
FIRE BRICKS AND CLAY 
SILICA AND MAGNESIA 
BRICKS, 

with spectally prepared mortar. 

Contractors' and Founders' 
Supplies. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

31 WELLINGTON ST., MONTREAL 

. . FULL STOCK . . 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWERPJPE 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

'he CANADIAN SEWER PIPE GO. 

HAMILTON, ONT. TORONTO, ONT. 

ST. JOHNS. QUE. 



Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 

Manufacturers of 

Charcoal Pig Iron 



^ 



BRAND "DESERONTO." 



Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery where great strength 
b required ; Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



sizes, 1 to 5, No. 2 and larger, .$3.60 ; No. 
1 and smaller, $3.85; feat her- weight, all 
sizes, $4.85 ; toe weight steel shoes, all 
sizes, |5.95 f.o.b. Montreal ; f.o.b. Hamil- 
ton. London anil Guelph, 10c. extra. 

POULTRY NETTING— There is not much 
business doing in this line. The discount 

is ">.*> per cent. 

GREEN WIRE CLOTH— Letter ordersfor 
green wire cloth are numerous. We quote: 

s|.:',5. 

SCREEN DOORS AND WINDOWS - 
The demand for screens has been quite brisk 
again this week. We quote : Screen 

doors, plain cherry finish, $7.30 per 
do/,.; do. fancy, §11.50 per do/.; walnut, 
$7.30 per doz., and yellow, $7.45; windows. 
§2.25 to §3.50 per doz. 

S( 'HEWS— Sorting orders for Fairly large 
quantities are numerous. The market is 
stead} to firm. Discounts arc : Flat head 
bright, Hi 1-2 and 10 per cent, off list : 
round head, bright, 82 1-2 and 10 per cent.; 
flat head, brass, 80 and 10 per cent.; round 
head, brass. 75 and 10 per cent. 

BOLTS— Moderate quantities have been 
asked for. The tone of the market is 

firm. Discounts are as follows: Nor 

waj carriage bolts, (>."> per cent.; common, liO 
pel- cent.; machine bolts, 60 per cent.; 
coach screws, 70 per cent.; sleigh shoe bolts, 
72 1-2 per cent.; blank bolts, 70 per cent.; 
bolt ends. 62 1-2 per cent.; plough bolts. 60 
pci cent.; tire bolts, 67 1-2 per cent.; stove 
bolts, 67 1-2 per cent. To any retailer an 
extra discount of 5 per cent, is allowed. 
Nuts, square, 4c. per lb. off list ; hexagon 
nuts, 4 l-4c. per lb. off list. To all retail- 
ers an extra discount of 1 -de. per lb. is 
allowed. 

BUILDING PAPER-The demand is 
quite up to ordinary dimensions. We 
quote as follows : Tarred felt, §1.70 
per 100 lb. ; 2-ply ready roofing, 
80c. per roll : 3-ply, ' 8 1.05 "per roll ; 
carpet felt. $2.25 per 100 lb. ; dry sheath- 
ing, 30c. per roll ; tar sheathing, 
40c. per roll ; dry fibre, 50c. per roll ; 
tarred fibre, 60c. per roll ; O.K. and I.X.L.. 
65c. per roll ; heavy straw sheathing, $28 
per ton ; slaters' felt. 50c. per roll. 

RIVETS AND BURRS— The market is 
steady at former quotations. Dis- 

counts on best iron rivets, section. 
carriage, and wagon box, black rivets, 
tinned do., coopers' rivets and tinned 
swede's rivets, 60 and 10 per cent. ; 
swedes iron burrs are quoted at 55 per cent. 
off ; copper rivets, 35 and 5 per cent, off : 
and coppered iron rivets and buns, in 5 lb. 
carton boxes, are quoted at 60 and 10 per 
cent, off list. 

BINDER TWINE— A fair business is to be 
noted. We quote ; Blue Ribbon, II I -2c; 
Red Cap, 9 3-4c.; Tiger, 8 3-4c.; "Oolden 
Crown, 8c; Sisal, 8 l-4c 

CORDAGE— Good quantities arc selling. 
Manila is worth 1 3 l-2c. per II). for 7-16 
and larger ; sisal brings !Oc. and lath yam, 
|Oe. 

HARVEST TOOLS— The demand shows a 
falling off. The discount is 50, 10 and 5 
per cent. 

SPADES AND SHOYKI.S There is lit- 
tle doing. The discount is 10 "and 5 per 
cent . 

LAWN MOWERS— Orders are not numer- 
ous just now. We quote as follows : High 
wheel, 50 and 5 per cent, f.o.b. Monl 
real ; low wheel, in all sizes, §2.75 each 
net ; high wheel, 11-inch. 30 per cent. off. 

FIREBRICKS— Trade is not brisk, still 
a fair local business is being done. We 



Platesand Sheets 

Tank, Boiler and Firebox Plates. 
Lysaght's Best Steel Sheets. 

Low Prices for Import to Wholesale Buyers. 

Sanderson's Tool Steel 



In 
Stock. 



A. C, LESLIE & CO. 

MONTREAL. 




IRON AND 
BRASS 



Pun 



Foroe, Lift and Cistern 
Hand and Power. 

For all duties. We can 
supply your wants with 
— quality the best and 
prices right. Catalogues 
and full information for a 
request. 



CHE H. McDOUGALL CO., Limited 

Manufacturers, Gait, Canada. 

ADAM HOPE & CO. 

Hamilton, Ont. 

We offer from stock 

Coke Tin Plates I C 14x20, 
" IC20x 28, 
Galvanized Sheet Iron, 

"Comet" and American Brands. 

L. and F. Ingot Tin, 
Straits Tin, 
Ingot Copper, 
Pig Lead, Spelter and Antimony, 

Nova Scotia Steel Go. 



Limited 



NEW eLASBOW, N.S. 



Manufacturers of 



Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMENS MARTIN 

Open Hearth Steel 



18 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



If you are looking for a high-grade 
Finish for floors 



biranitine [ lD ? r , 

Finish 



is unsurpassed in durability and beauty of finish for natural 
wood and parquette floors, linoleums, oil cloth, cork matting, 
etc. Its transparency reveals the grain of the wood and its 
preserving qualities increase the life of the floor. 

It is easier applied, more durable, makes better finish than 
wax preparations, and is free from all 

Unpleasant Slipperiness. 

Moving furniture or boot heels do not leave white marks, 
nor does soap, mud or water destroy its fine appearance. 

SEND FOR SAMPLE ORDER. 



MANUFACTUKED ONLY BY 



The 



r l Imperial Varnish & Color Co. 



TORONTO, ONT., CANADA. 



LIMITED 



Binder Twine Binder Twine 

The John Bowman 
Hardware & Coal Co., 

London, Ont. 

We can supply for immediate shipment : 

Peoria Standard Twine, 500 feet, 
Consumers Cordage Co.'s Red Cap, 600 feet 
Consumers Cordage Co.'s Blue Ribbon, 050 teet. 

Shipment guaranteed day order is received. 

Binder Twine Binder Twine 



quote Scotch at $17.50 to $22, and English 
at SIT to $21 per 1,000 ex-wharf. 

CEMENT — Some fair sales have been made 
this week. We quote : German cement, 
§2.25 to §2.40 ; English, $2.20 to $2.35 ; 
Belgian, $1.(55 to $1.95 per bbl. ex-wharf, 
and American, $2.15 to $2.30, ex cars. 

METALS. 

The feature of the metal market is the 
bullish tendency of quotations from Eng- 
land. Cables received this week all indi- 
cate a much higher market in sheet metals. 
At the same time one must take into con- 
sideration the fact that the mills o\er there 
are not crowded with orders and regard this 
rise as temporary, due solely to the Amer- 
ican strike. The tendency in pig iron is 
now downward, due to the diminution of 
consumption in the United States. 

PIG, IRON— There is not a great deal of 
activity in this line. Small sales of Sum- 
merlee have been made at $20 to $211.5(1 
and Canadian pig is rather slow at $17.50 
to $18 per ton. 

BAR IRON— The market is firm and 
dealers are selling at $1.80 to $1.85 lor mer- 
chants' bar and $2.10 to $2.15 for horse- 
shoe. 

BLACK SHEETS-English cables quote 
black sheets higher on primary gauges, the 
advance amounting to about Ids. We quote: 
28 gauge, $2.70 to $2.S0 ; 20 gauge. $2,65 
to $2.75, and 8 to 10 gauge, $2.60 to 
$2.70. 

GALVANIZED IRON— The English mar- 
ket is very firm and some quotations are 
even withdrawn. American iron is tem- 
porarily withdrawn from the market ; it 
was offered for September shipment but the 
strikes have prevented further business. We 
quote as follows : No. 28 Queen's Head. 



$4.40 ; Apollo, 10 3-4 oz., 
81.15, with 25c. extra in 
lots. 
COPPER- 



$4.40 ; Comet, 
less than case 



-Is steady at 17 3-4 to 18c. 

INGOT TIN— The English market is 
rather easy at the moment but as yet 
prices here are held firm at 32 to 33c. 

LEAD— Sales have been made at $3. in to 
$3.50 per 100 lb. 

LEAD PIPE— The demand is steady. We 
quote 7c. for ordinary and 7 I -2c. for com- 
position waste, with 30 per cent. off. 

IRON PIPE— A brisk trade is still being 
done in iron pipe at the recent advance. 
W'e quote : Black pipe, 1-1, 82. SO per 
100 ft. ; 3-8, $2.80 ; 1-2, $3 ; 3-1, $3.3(1 ; 
1-in., $1.75; 11-4, $6.45; 11-2, $7.75; 
2-in. ; $10.35. Galvanized, 1-2, $4.60; 3-4, 
$5.25; 1-in., $7.50; 11-4, $9.80: 11-2, 
$11.75 ; 2 -in., $16. 

TINPLATES— Coke tinplates are quoted 
by cable at lis. 3d., a slight advance. 
Stocks here continue light as also the 
demand. W'e quote as follows : Coke plates. 
$3.75 to $1 ; charcoal, $4.25 to $4.50 ; 
extra quality, $5 to $5.10. 

CANADA PLATE— In England Canada, 
plates are none too plentiful and they are 
now quoted at another slight advance. Sup- 
plies here are very scarce. W'e quote : 
52's, $2.55 ; Oil's, '$2.65 ; 75's. $2.70 : full 
polished, $3.10, and galvanized, $1. 

STEEL— Unchanged. We quote : Sleigh- 
shoe, $2.00 ; tire, $2.05 ; bar, $2 ; spring, 
$2.75 ; machinery, $2.75, and toe-calk, 
$2.50. 

SHEET STEEL-We quote : Gauges, No. 
10 to 20. $2.50. 

TOOL STEEL— Black Diamond, 8c. and 
Jessop's, 13c. 



TERNE PLATES— Goods are very scarce 
with but little supply in sight. The lad- 
ing quotation now is $7.50. 

COIL CHAIN - A moderate demand 
is reported . We quote as follows 
No. 6, 12 l-2c; No. 5, 10 l-2c. ; No. 4, 
10c; No. 3, 9 l-4c. ; 1-4-inch, 7 l-4c. per 
lb. ; 5-16, $4.75 ; 5-16 exact, $5.20 ; 3-8, 
$1.20 ; 7-16, $4 ; 1-2, $3.80 ; 9-16, $3.70 ; 
5-8, $3.50 ; 3-4, $3.45 ; 7-8, $3.40 ; 1-in.. 
$3.40. In carload lots an allowance of 10c. 
is made. 

SHEET ZINC— Unchanged at 85.75 to 
$6. 

ANTIMONY-Quiet, at 10c. 

ZINC SPELTER-Is worth 5c. 

SOLDER— We quote : Bar solder, 18 l-2c; 
wire solder, 20c. 

GLASS. 

FAIR quantities o\ glass are moving at 
steady prices. We quote as follows : 
First' break. $2.10 : second, $2.20 for 50 
fieet ; first .break. 100 feet, $3.90 ; second, 
$4.10; third, $4.60; fourth, $4.85; fifth. 
$5.35 ; sixth, $5.85, and seventh, $6.35. 

PAIN'S AND OILS. 

The demand for liquid paints is well main- 
tained although it is of course not so brisk 
as a month ago. Paris green has been in 
lna\\ demand this week and manufacturers 
have set to work to manufacture more — an 
unusual thing at this season of the year. 
Large shipments have been hurriedly made 
to the Maritime Provinces. Linseed oil I 
firm while turpentine is a little easier. Our 
local quotations are unchanged. W'e quote : 

WHITE LEAD— Best brands, Government 
standard, $6.25 : No. 1, $5.87 1-2 ; No. 2, 
$5.50 ; No. 3. $5.12 1-2, and No. 4, $4.75 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



19 



all f.o.b. Montreal. Terms, 3 per cent, 
cash or four months. 

DRY WHITE LEAD-85.25 in casks ; 
kegs, $5.50. 

RED LEAD— Casks, |S ; in kegs, $5.25. 

DRY WHITE ZINC- Pure, dry, 6 l-4c. ; 
No. 1. 5 ]-4c. ; in oil, pure, 7 l-4c. ; No. 1, 
6 J -4c. ; No. 2, 5 l-4c. 

PUTTY— We quote : Bulk, in barrels. 
81.90 per 100 lb. ; bulk, in less quantity. 
$2.05 ; bladders, in barrels, $2.10 ; bladders, 
in 100 or 200 lb. kegs or boxes, $2.25 ; in 
tins, $2.55 to $2.65 ; in less than 100-lb. 
lots, $3 f.o.b. Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, 
m Hamilton, London and Guelph. Maritime 
^ Provinces, 10c. higher, f.o.b. St. John and 
Halifax. 

LINSEED OIL— Raw, 83c; boiled, 86c. 
in 5 to 9 bbls., lc. less ; 10 to 20 bbl. lots, 
open, net cash, plus 2c. for 4 months. 
Delivered anywhere in Ontario between 
Montreal and Oshawa at 2c. per gal. advance 
and freight allowed. 

TURPENTINE— Single bbls., 55e.; 2 to 4 
bbls., 54c; 5 bbls. and over, open terms, 
the same terms as linseed oil. 

MIXED PAINTS-$1.20 to $1.45 per gal. 

CASTOR OIL-S3-4 to 9 l-4c in whole- 
sale lots, and l-2c. additional for small 
lots. 

SEAL OIL-47 1-2 to 49c 

COD OIL-32 1-2 to 35c. 

NAVAL STORES-We quote . Resins. 
$2.75 to $4.50, as to brand : coal tar,$3.25 
to S3. 75 ; cotton waste, 4 1-2 to 5 l-2c for 
colored, and (i to 7 l-2c for white ; oakum, 

5 1-2 to 6 I -2c, and cotton oakum, 10 to 
lie. 

PAIilS GREEN-Petroleum barrels, 18 
3-4.C. per lb.; arsenic, kegs, 19c; 50 and 100- 
lb. drums, 19 l-2c; 25-lb. drums, 20c; Mb. 
packages, 20 l-2c ; 1-2-lb. packages, 22 
I -2c. ; i-lb. tins, 21 l-2c ; 1-2-lb. tins, 23 
I -2c f.o.b. Montreal ; terms 3 per cent. 30 
days, or four months from date of delivery. 

SCRAP METALS. 

There is not a great deal of activity in 
the scrap metal market ; in fact, iron is 
rather easy, the rolling mills paying 
$16 for No. 1 wrought. Dealers 

are now paying the following prices 
in the country : Heavy copper and wire, 13 
1-2 to 14c. per lb. ; light copper, 12 to 12 
1-2.; heavy brass. 12 to 12 l-2c: heavy 
yellow, 9c. ; light brass, 6 1-2 to 7c: 
lead, 2 1-2 to 2 3-4c. per lb.; zinc', 2 
1-1 to 2 l-2c ; iron, No. I wrought, $14 to 
SI.") per uross ton f.o.b. Montreal : No. 1 
cast, $13 to $14; stove plate, $8 to $9 ; 
light iron, No. 2, $4 a ton ; malleable and 
steel. $1 : rags, country, 60 to 70c per 100 
lb. ; old rubbers, 6 3-4 to 7 l-4c per lb. 

HIDES. 

There has been some improvement in the 
demand for hides and dealers are now pay- 
ing 7 l-2c for No. 1 light. Lambskins are 
selling well at 20c. each. We quote as 
follows : Light hides. 7 I -2c for No. 1 : 

6 I -2c for No. 2, and 5 l-2c for No. 3. 
Lambskins, 20c. ; sheepskins, $1 ; calf- 
skins, 19c for No. 1 and 8c for No. 2 



S 



TO MAKE GLUE FLOOR PAINT. 

Dissolve two ounces of glue in boiling 
water, then add three ounces of ochre yel- 
ow paint, to be kept warm while using. 
When dry apply one coat of boiled linseed 
oil. In warm weather it will set in a short 
time, so the floor can be used in a few 
hours. 



ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Toronto, July 26, 1901 
HARDWARE. 

THE wholesale hardware trade con- 
tinues fair for this time of the year. 
Most of the travellers are still holi- 
daying, but letter orders are quite numerous. 
The strike in the United States is causing 
increases in the price of steel and sheets, 
but in shelf and heavy hardware there are 
no quotable changes in prices. A good 
trade is still being done in harvest tools, 
wire nails, bolts, screws, rivets and burrs, 
rope, etc., although in some of these lines 
the demand is not quite so active as it was 
a week or two ago. The general condition 
of the country is satisfactory. The crops 
continue to promise well, and the railway 
earnings, bank clearings and bank returns 
are all favorable. 

Barb Wire — A little is going out from 
stock and some orders for shipment from 
Cleveland have been booked. We quote : 
$3 05 per 100 lb. from stock Toronto ; and 
$2 2,2*4. f.o.b. Cleveland for less than carlots, 
and %2. 70 for carlots. 

Galvanized Wire— Very little is now 
being done in this line. We quote as fol- 
lows : Nos. 6, 7 and 8, #3.50 to #3.85 
per 100 lb., according to quantity ; No. 9, 
$2.85 to S3. 15 ; No. 10, $3.60 to $3.95 ; 
No. 11, $3.70 to #4 10 ; No. 12, $3 to 
$3.30 ; No. 13, $3 10 to $3 40 ; No. 14, 
$4.10 to $4. 50 ; No. 15, #4.60 to $5 05 : 
No. 16, #4.85 to $5.35. Nos. 6 to 9 base 
f.o.b. Cleveland are quoted at #2.57^ in 
less than carlots and 12c. less for carlots of 
15 tons. 

Smooth Steel Wire — There is a little 
doing in both oiled and annealed and hay- 
baling wire. Net selling prices for oiled and 
annealed are as follows : Nos. 6 to 8, $2 .90; 
9, $2.80; 10, #2.87 ; 11, $2.90 ; 12, $2.95; 

13. $3-!5; J 4, #3-37 ; 15. #3-5°; l6 - 
$3 65. Delivery points, Toronto, Hamilton, 
London and Montreal, with freights equal- 
ized on those points. 

Wire Nails — The demand keeps good 
for wire nails in small lots. The base price 
is still $2.85 for less than carlots, and 
$2-77/4 for carlots. Delivery points 
Toronto, Hamilton, London, Gananoque 
and Montreal. 

Cut Nails — Outside the shingle nail 
sizes there is very little being done. The 
base price is $2.45 per keg for less than 
carlots, and $2.35 for carlots. Delivery 
points : Toronto, Hamilton, London, 
Montreal and St. John, N.B. 

Horse Nails — Trade is slow and 
featureless. Discount on "C" brand, 
oval head, 50 and 7)4 per cent, off new 
list, and on " M " and other brands, 50, 





Our Sheet 
Metal Fronts 



Offer you splendid improvement, at 
small cost, for any style of building - . 

We make them complete, to suit 
any sized or shaped structure — the 
entire metal finish including - door and 
window caps, cornices, etc. — in a great 
variety of styles. 

They give a very handsome effect, 
and enduring-, practical satisfaction. 

We g"i*ve estimates if you send 
measurements and outline of the build- 
ing. 

Think it over. 

Metallic R.oofing Co., 

Limited, 

WKolesale Manufacturers, 

TorontOj Canada. 



J 



10 and 5 per cent, .off the old list. Counter- 
sunk head 60 per cent. 

Horseshoes — Only a small trade is 
being done. We quote f.o.b. Toronto : Iron 
shoes, No. 2 and larger, light, medium and 
heavy, $3.60 ; snow shoes, #3.85 ; light 
steel shoes, $3. 70; featherweight (all sizes), 
$4.95; iron shoes, No. 1 and smaller, light, 
medium and heavy (all sizes), $3.85 ; snow 
shoes, $4. ; light steel shoes, $3.95; feather- 
weight (all sizes), $4. .95. 

Screws — Business keeps pretty brisk 
in wood screws. Discounts are : Fiat 



20 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



head bright, 87^ and 10 per cent. ; round 
head bright, 82^ and 10 percent.; flat head 
brass, 80 and 10 per cent.; round head brass, 
75 and 10 per cent. ; round head bronze, 
65 per cent., and flat head bronze at 70 
per cent. 

Rivets and Burrs — A good steady trade 
is still to be reported for rivets. We quote : 
Iron rivets, 60 and 10 per cent.; iron 
burrs, 55 per cent.; copper rivets and 
burrs, 25 and 5 per cent. 

Bolts and Nuts — Trade continues 
active, the manufacturers still being filled 
with orders. An improved demand is re- 
ported for stove and tire bolts. We 
quote as follows ; Carriage bolts (Nor- 
way), full square, 65 per cent.; carriage 
bolts full square, 65 per cent.; common 
carriage bolts, all sizes, 60 per cent.; 
machine bolts, all sizes, 60 per cent. ; coach 
screws, 70 per cent. ; sleighshoe bolts, 72 j£ 
per cent. ; blank bolts, 60 per cent. ; bolt 
ends, 62^ per cent.; nuts, square, 4c. off; 
nuts, hexagon, 4j£c. off; tire bolts, 67^ 
percent.; stove bolts, 67 j£ ; plough bolts, 
60 per cent. ; stove rods, 6 to 8c. 

Rope — The demand is still brisk for rope 
for hay fork purposes. The ba*e price of 
manila is unchanged at I3^c. per lb. and 
sisal at 10c. 

Binder Twine — A little sorting up is 
going on. We quote : Pure manila, 650 
ft., 12c; manila, 600 ft., 9j£c. ; mixed, 550 
ft., &)4c; mixed, 500 ft., 8 to &'/c. 

Sporting Goods — Trade is opening up 
nicely in sporting goods. Some rifles and 
loaded shells have gone out during the 
week. 

Cutlery — Some shipments have been 
made on British Columbian account, but, 
generally speaking, business is not brisk in 
cutlery. 

Enamelled Ware and Tinware — 
A fairly good trade is reported this week in 
both lines. 

Green Wire Cloth — There is some 
movement in a small way. We quote : 
$1.35 per 100 square ft. 

Screen Doors and Windows— Quite a 
little business for this time of the year in 
screen windows, and a few screen doors are 
going out. We now quote as follows : 
Screen doors, 4 in. styles, $7.20 to $7.80 
per doz.; ditto, 3 in. styles, 20c. per doz. 
less; screen windows, $1.60 to $3.60 per 
doz., according to size and extension. 

Building Paper — The movement is 
fairly good all the time. We quote: Building 
paper, 30c; tarred paper, 40c, and tarred 
roofing, $1.65. 

Harvest Tools — The demand is not 
as heavy as it was for scythes, snaths and 
cradles, but there is still, however, a nice 
movement. Discount, 50, 10 and 5 per 
cent. 



Spades and Shovels — Business is 
seasonably quiet. Discount, 40 and 5 per 
cent. 

Eavetrough— Trade keeps fair. We still 
quote 10-inch at $3.25 per 100 ft. 

Cement — Though the season has been 
somewhat late, the total volume of business 
to date has been considerably in excess of 
former years. Prices are firm. We quote 
barrel lots as follows : Canadian port- 
land, $2.25 to $2.75 ; German, #3 to $315; 
English, $3; Belgian, $2.50 to $2.75; 
Canadian hydraulic, 51.25 to 51.50. 
METALS. 

The strike in the United States is impart- 
ing a decidedly strong tone to the sheet 
market and to steel, and our quotations on 
tinplates, common black sheets and hoop 
steel are all higher. 

Pig Iron — The market is quiet and prices 
are barely steady. The strike in the United 
States is not helping the pig iron market 
just now. No. 2 foundry, of domestic make, 
is worth from 517 <o $17 50 per ton. 

Bar Iron — The position of bar iron 
seems to be as strong as ever. The demand 
is good and the mills are still behind with 
their orders. The ruling base price is$i 85 
to $I.QO. 

Steel — Buyers are beginning to look 
ahead a little more than they were and 
quite a number of inquiries have been heard 
the past week. Prices are hardening, 
partly at least on account of the strike in 
the United States. Our quotations on hoop 
steel are 10c. per 100 lb. higher. We 
quote: Merchantable cast steel, 9 to 15c. per 
lb.; drill steel, 8 to 10c. per lb. ; "B C" and 
"Black Damond" tool steel, 10 to lie.'; 
Jessop's, Morton's and Firth's tool steel, 
12^ to 13c. ; toe calk steel, $2. 85 to 53; 
tire steel, $2 30 to 52.50; sleighshoe steel, 
52.10 to 52 25 ; reeled machinery steel, 
53; hoop steel, 53 10. 

Galvanized Sheets — The demand 
during the past week has been good. Prices 
have been advancing in Great Britain, and 
higher figures are looked for here, especially 
in view of the strike in the United States 
mills. The ruling quotation on 28 gauge 
is still 54. 50 for English, and 54 40 for 
American. 

Black Sheets — Common sheets are 
10 to 15c. higher than they were. The 
price of 28 gauge is now $3.15. Dead flit 
is still quoted at 53 50 for 26 gauge. 

Canada Plates — More inquiries have 
been heard and some improvement has 
taken place in business. We quote all dull, 
52.90 ; half polished, 53 ; and all bright, 

53S°- 

Tin — The week has witnessed some 
sharp declines in pig tin in London, prices 
having dropped ^12 15s. in four days. On 



OAKEY'S 



The original and only Genuine Pre- 
paration for Cleaning Cutlery. 
6d. and is. Canisters. 



WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE POLISH 



JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, London, England. 

Agent: 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL, 



COVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, NY. 

Steel Carriage and 

Wagon Jacks, 

Harness Snaps, Chiin, Rope and Web 
Goods, etc. 

FOR SAI.F. BV JOBBERS ATMFRS. PRICES. 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 

BA ^iui -^??7 Large* Variety , 
ft^-j-CrT^X? Toilet, Hand, Electric Vow 

/'ARE THE BEST. 

Highest duality Grooming and 
Sheep-Shearing Machine! 

WE MAKE THEM. 

8KKD FOB OATALOOT/K TO 
laarleaa Bkaaiw «f|t. Co.. lU.hna. K.H..C84 





Don't Forget the Name. . . 

NEWMANS INVINCIBLE 

FLOOR SPRINGS 

Strong, Quick, Reliable, Effective. 
Will close a door against any pressure of wind. Far 
ahead of ordinary door springs, pneumatic or other- 
wise. Ask your wholesaler. 

W. NEWMAN & SONS, Birmingham. 



Oneida Community Goods 

HALTERS, COW TIES, SNAPS, etc., etc., 

in all sizes and styles. May be had of all 
jobbers throughout Canada. 

Factory— NIAGARA FALLS, ONT. 



Mackenzie Bros. 

HARDWARE 
MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS, 

WINNIPEG 



Travellers covering Manitoba, 
Northwest Territories and 
British Columbia. 



) 



MAN. 



Correspondence Solicited. 



THE PULLMAN PNEUMATIC 

Combined 



Door Check 
and Spring. 




for Screen Doors. Small, Simple, Strong, Perfect and 
Ornamental. Low in Price. 

PULLMAN SASH BALANCE CO.. 

ROCHESTER, NY., U.S A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



21 



Wednesday, however, there was a slight 
recovery. Locally, trade has been light 
and quotations unchanged at 31^ to 32c. 
per lb. 

Tinplates — Prices have been rapidly 
advancing in Great Britain. Locally, the 
demand is good, some fairly large quantities 
having been sold, while quotations have 
been marked up 25c. per box. I. C. coke 
plates are now quoted at $4.25. 

Tinned Sheets — The demand is good 
for this time of the year and 28 guage is 
Vunchanged at 8^c. per lb. 

Terne Plates — Another advance of 
50c. is to be recorded in terne plates, I.C. 
this week being quoted at 59. 

Copper — Business has been more active 
in ingot copper and fair in sheet copper. 
We quote ingot at I7^c, bars at 23 to 
25c, sheet at 24 to 24^c, and planished 
at 32c. 

Brass — Trade is fair and discount on 
rod and sheet unchanged at 10 per cent. 

Solder — A fair trade is being done. We 
quote: Half andhalf, guaranteed, ig>£c; 
ditto, commercial, 19c; refined, i8^c, and 
wiping, 17c. 

Iron Pipe— The price of iron pipe is stiff. 
Prices are higher in the United States, and 
further appreciation in values here is not 
improbable. We still quote 1 in. black pipe 
at $5.40 and 1 in. galvanized at $7.95. 

Lead — Trade is still rather quiet. The 
outside markets are quiet and steady. We 
quote 4^ to 4J^c. per lb. 

Zinc Spelter — There was a decline of 
5s. per ton in London on Wednesday, but 
in New York and here no change has taken 
place. We quote 5^ to 6c. per ib. 

Zinc Sheets — A good trade is being 
done at 6j^c.per lb. for cask lots and 6^c 
for smaller quantities. 

Antimony — Trade is quiet and prices 
unchanged at ioj£ to 11c. per lb. The 
outside markets are quiet, but steady. 
PAINTS AND OILS, 

There is little doing. Many of the job- 
bers have taken their travellers off the road 
and retailers are only sending in a few sort- 
ing orders. There is no change in prices. 
The advance in paris green is maintained 
by manufacturers, but jobbers are still sell- 
ing at 2c. below present quotations. Linseed 
oil is steady, as the receipts of English oil 
have not been as large as was anticipated. 
The turpentine market is featureless. Other 
lines are steady. We quote as follows : 

White Lead — Ex Toronto, pure white 
^lead, $6.37 j£ ; No. 1, $6; No. 2. #5.67^ ; 
r^o- 3. $5.25 ; No. 4, $4 87 '4 ; genuine 
dry white lead in casks, $5.37^. 

Red Lead — Genuine, in casks of 560 lb., 
S5.25; ditto, in kegs of 100 lb., #5.50 ; No. 




NICHOLSON 



OO., Providence, R.I., U.S.A. 



BRITISH PLATE GLASS COMPANY, Limited. 



Established 1773 



Manufacturers of Polished, Silvered, Bevelled. Chequered, and Rough Plate Glass. Also 

35 a durable, highly-polished material called " MARBLETTE," suitable for Advertising Tablets, Signs, 
Facias, Direction Plates, Clock Faces, Mural Tablets, Tombstones, etc. This is supplied plain, embossed, 

or with incised gilt letters. Benders, Embossers, Brilliant Cutters, etc., etc. Estimates and 

Designs on application. 
Works: Ravenhead, St. Helens, Lancashire. Agencies : r°7 Cannon Street, London, E.C — 128 Hope Street, Glas- 
gow— 12 East Parade, Leeds, and 36 Par dise Street, Birmingham. Telegraphic Address: "Glass, St. Helens" 
Telephone No. 68 St. Helens. 

FOR SALE 



RE-LAYING RAILS 



350 tons 56. rail and fastenings. 
75 tons 50. " " " 

20 tons 14. " 



Prompt Deliveries. Also Logging and Pit Rails. 

SESSENWEIN BROS., 101 Shannon Street, MONTREAL. 



i, in casks of 560 lb., $4 .50; ditto, kegs of 
100 lb., $4-75- 

Litharge — Genuine, 6% to 6#c. 

Orange Mineral — Genuine, 7^ to 8c. 

White Zinc — Genuine, French V.M., in 
casks, $7 to $7.25; Lehigh, in casks, $6. 

Paris White — 90c. to $1 per 100 lb. 

Whiting — 65c. per 100 lb. ; Gilders' 
whiting, 80c. 

Gum Shellac — In cases, 22c; in less 
than cases, 25c. 

Paris Green — Bbls., i8^c. ; kegs, 19c; 
50 and 100 lb. drums, I7^c; 25-lb. drums, 
20c; i-lb. papers, 2oj£c; i-lb. tins, z\yic.\ 
Yz-Va. papers, 22^c; % lb. tins, 23^. 

Putty — Bladders, in bbls., $2.10; blad- 
ders, in 100 lb. kegs, $2.25; bulk in bbls., 
$1.90 ; bulk, less than bbls. and up to 100 
lb., $2.05 ; bladders, bulk or tins, less than 
100 lb., $2.90. 

Plaster Paris — New Brunswick, $1.90 
per bbl. 

Pumice Stone — Powdered, #2.50 per 
cwt. in bbls., and 4 to 5c. per lb. in less 
quantity ; lump, 10c. in small lots, and 8c. 
in bbls. 

Liquid Paints — Pure, $1.20 to $1. 30 per 
gal. 

Castor Oil — English, in cases, 9^ to 
ioc. per lb. and 10 to io^c. for single 
tins. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 1 to 4 barrels, 84c. ; 
boiled, 87c; 5 to 9 barrels, raw, 81c. ; 
boiled, 84c, delivered. To Toronto, 
Hamilton, Guelph and London, ic. less. 

Turpentine — Single barrels, 55c; 2 
to 4 barrels, 54c, delivered. Toronto, 
Hamilton and London ic. less. For less 
quantities than barrels, 5c. per gallon extra 
will be added, and for 5 -gallon packages, 
50c, and 10 gallon packages, 80c. will be 
charged. 



GLASS. 
Arrivals are not large, but, as there is not 
much doing, the feeling is steady. We 
quote as follows: Under 26 in., $4.15 
26 to 40 in., $4.45 ; 41 to 50 in., $4.85; 
51 to 60 in., $5.15; 61 to 70 in., $5.50; 
double diamond, under 26 in., $6 ; 26 to 
40 in., £6.65 ; 41 to 50 in., $7.50; 51 to 
60 in., $8.50; 61 to 70 in., $9.50, Toronto, 
Hamilton and London. Terms, 4 months 
or 3 per cent. 30 days. 

OLD MATERIAL. 

Scrap iron is ice. per cwt. dearer, 
but there is little doing. We quote job- 
bers' prices as follows : Agricultural scrap, 
60c. per cwt.; machinery cast, 60c. per 
cwt.; stove cast, 40c; No. 1 wrought 
50c. per 100 lb.; new light scrap copper, 
12c. per lb. ; bottoms, 11c; heavy cop- 
per, I2^c. ; coil wire scrap, i2j£c ; 
'ight brass, 7c; heavy yellow brass, ioc; 
heavy red brass, io^c. ; scrap lead, 2^"c. ; 
zinc, 2c. ; scrap rubber, 6^c. ; good 
country mixed rags, 6510 75c; clean dry 
bones, 40 to 50c. per 100 lb. 

HIDES. SKINS AND WOOL. 

Hides — The market is weak here in 
sympathy with that of the United States, 
and a decline is looked for. No changes in 
prices have occurred. We quote as follows : 
Cowhides, No. 1, 8c; No. 2, 7c. ; No. 3, 
6c Steerhides are worth ic more. Cured 
hides are quoted at 8)4 to 9c 

Skins — Prices are steady and a fair trade 
is doing. We quote : No. 1 veal, 8-lb. and 
up, 9c per lb.; No. 2, 8c; dekins, from 55 
to 60c; culls, 20 to 25c ; sheepskins, 90c 
to $1. 

SITUATION WANTED. 

BY Hardware Clerk, four years' experience, first- 
class references. Box 57, Hardware and 
Metal. (30) 



22 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Wool — There is a moderate demand at 
steady prices. Our quotations are : Comb- 
ing fleece, washed, 13c, and unwashed, 
8c. 

COAL. 

Anthracite coal is somewhat scarce, 
and will be 10c. per ton higher during 
August than was quoted during July. 
We quote as follows at international 
bridges : Grate, $4 .75 per gross ton ; egg, 
stove and nut. $5 per gross ton with a re- 
bate of ioc. off for August shipments. 

PETROLEUM. 

There is little doing, and prices are 
steady. We quote as follows: Pratt' s Astral 
16 to i6^c. in bulk (barrels, $1 extra) ; 
American water white, 16^ to 17c. in 
barrels; Photogene, 15X t0 16c. ; Sarnia 
water white, 15 to I5j£c. in barrels; Sarnia 
prime white, 14 to 14^ c. in barrels. 



MARKET NOTES. 

Hoop steel is ioc. dearer. 

Tinplates are quoted 25c. and terne plates 
50c. higher. 

August quotations on anthracite coal are 
ioc. above July figures. 

H. S. Howland, Sons & Co. are in 
receipt of a shipment of Eley's shells, 
loaded with both black and smokeless 
powders. 

The Toronto branch of the wholesale 
firm of Wood, Vallance & Co. has received 
a complete line of samples of guns and 
rifles represented in the latest sporting 
goods catalogue issued by the firm. A new 
gun case for the accommodation of the 
samples is being placed in position in the 
sample room at 32 Front street west. 



- NEW NAIL-MAKING MACHINERY. 

The Graham Nail Works have provided 
themselves with the necessary machinery to 
make wire nails up to eight inches They 
are now able to supply eavetrough spikes of 
their own manufacture. 



SAY WHAT YOU MEAN. 

On the Bowery there is one man who 
owns a number of stores, and over each he 
has hung a sign which reads, " The 
Cheapest Man on Earth." The popularity 
of a certain song attests that the world 
" don't like no cheap man " ; what would 
be the opinion of the world on the "cheap- 
est' ' man ? 

On the same classic avenue a mission 
has adorned its front window with white 
enamel letters, reading "Come in a few 
minutes." Why not now ? Perhaps the 
soul of some tramp is thirsting for the 
living waters at the moment, and " in a few 
minutes " it may be too late. 

Both of these signs, the one over the 
pawnshop and the other over a mission, 
are advertising mistakes : they teach an 
elementary lesson to all purchasers of pub- 
licity, and that lesson is, say what you 
mean. — Profitable Advertising. 



FAILURES FOR THREE MONTHS. 

DUN'S REVIEW says : " Canadian 
returns for the second quarter of 
1 90 1 were much more satisfactory 
than during the preceding three months, 
both in number and amount of liabilities. 
Compared with 1900 there was a moderate 
decrease in the aggregate, due to a differ- 
ence of $607,316 in trading defaults, no 
branch showing an increase of importance, 
while but three exhibited any advance. 
Manufacturing lines were also in better con- 



Well, they go forth. How many of them 
find the waste basket without being read ? 
How many are only seen by the mail 
opening clerk only ? 

A good trade paper will carry a full page 
ad. onetime to 10,000 subscribers, and the 
thousands of others who borrow and read it. 
That costs $60 to $75. What a difference. 

Now bookkeep it : 

Circulars, 10,000, sent as letters at one mailing. $275 
Trade paper, full page to 10,000 interested 

subscribers 75 

Difference in favor of trade paper 200 



190 1. 

No. Liabilities. 

Iron 1 $ 57,000 

Tools 1 1 ,600 

Wool 3 21,500 

Cctton 1 18,740 

Wood 13 109,336 

Clothing 12 110,012 

Hats 

Chemicals 2 5.382 

Printing 2 4,700 

Milling 3 6,000 

Leather 4 12,000 

Liquors 1 3,000 

Earthenware 

Mis-ellaneous 21 841,215 

Mnfg 64 $1, 190, 485 

General Stores 56 240,532 

Grocers 32 161,417 

Hotels 6 16,650 

Liquors 3 2,900 

Clothing 9 44,000 

Dry Goods 9 153,210 

Shoes 13 73.44° 

Furniture 6 10,771 

Stoves 10 52,246 

Drugs 8 29,850 

Jewelry 4 16,300 

Books 2 28,445 

Caps 2 2,800 

Miscellaneous 17 65,283 

Trading 177 $ 897,844 

Transporters, etc 7 108,875 

Total 248 $2,197,204 



1900. 
No. Liabilities. 
2 $ 15,300 
4 I937I 



12 
10 



14 

1 

1 

27 

82 

49 
40 

7 
8 
22 
20 
14 
4 
12 

5 
2 



16 

203 

9 



56,416 
17.337 

79,360 

1.053 

24.53° 

287,725 

3.55° 

1,000 

213,619 

$ 719,261 
340,790 
256,941 
2Q.73S 
12,900 
217,271 
318,624 

92.454 

10,587 

Si 845 

8,400 

6,700 

66,600 

3,000 

98.313 

51,505,160 
33.58o 



No. Liabilities. 

1 $ 75.°o° 

4 5.180 

1 17,600 



17 

52 
39 
35 
16 



9 

16 
2 
5 
5 
4 



13 

170 
2 



43.300 
38,262 

9.743 

2,100 

17,289 

S5.5oo 

5 100 

122,416 

301 ,490 

155. "7 
67.741 
36,155 
31.764 
27,600 

117,190 
82,340 
9, coo 
63 800 
10,700 
16,250 
32,366 
3.760 

341.356 

995.139 
8,300 



294 $2,258,001 224 $1,394,929 



dition, but the aggregate in this division 
was doubled by two large failures of paper 
mills, which made the total $471,224 
greater than last year. 



SOME FIGURES FOR BUSINESS MEN. 

The average business man believes in 
sending out 5,000 to 25,000 circular letters 
now and again. He calls it cheap adver- 
tising. Is it ? asks National Provisioner. 
Let's see : 10,000 circulars or circular 
letters mailed one time at ic. each cost 
$100 for postage alone. If they are imita- 
tion typewriter print with each name writ- 
ten in to fool and entice the recipient, they 
will cost fully $50. The envelopes for 
mailing them will cost $25 more if they 
are of good quality. That means a total 
cost of $175 at the lowest to get these 
circular letters into the mails as circulars. 
If the deception is carried to the limit, a 2C 
stamp must be put on to rob the affair of its 
circular character. That means $200 instead 
of $100 for postage, or a tota cost of $275 
to post 10,000 imitation typewritten letters 
at one mailing. To this must be added the 
office boy, or cost of addressing them. 



Yet men willingly eat up their substance 
in circulars and growl at the economical 
and better medium, the respected trade 
paper. 

The great business concerns advertise. 
They do not waste money on circulars and 
letters which are not seen. 

Wanamaker, Macy, Siegel - Cooper, 
Ehrich, Hearn, Simpson, Crawford & 
Simpson, Adams Bros, and other great 
New York department stores advertise. 
They do not fill your mails and mail boxes 
with circular letters. The other big sucess- 
ful men do the same. It's the small fellow 
who thinks he has found a cheap method 
who uses the circular letter. 

Just think it over and ask yourself if the 
page ad. in a good trade paper is not really 
cheapest of all of your commercial travel- 
lers. 



Mr. Archie Denny, who has been with 
the Smart Manufacturing Co., Hamilton, 
for the past 15 years, has joined thf 
travelling staff of the Gurney-Tilden Co., 
Limited, and will in the future represent the 
latter company east of Toronto. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



2.3 



1879 



ESTABLISHED 



1879 



J* 



Essex Handle and Wood 
Turning Works 

Late of Essex, now LEAMINGTON, ONT. 

Makers of Axe, Fork, Rake, Hoe, Sledge, Broom, 
Hammer and all kinds of Handles. Neck Yokes, 
Singletrees and Doubletrees, Bench Saws, Exercise 
Clubs, Baseball Bats, etc., etc. Do you sell any 
Shaved Pattern and Octagon Axe Handles? The 
largest and best trade in Canada does, because they 
give best satisfaction. All stock air-dried, not 
kiln-dried. If you are going to be in it, place your 
order with 

GARDNER BROS. & CO. 



CHAMPION FIRE and 
BURGLAR-PROOF . . 



SAFES 



ESTABLISHED HERE SIXTEEN YEARS. 

We sell direct to 
the user, and save 
all commissions. 

SIXTEEN SIZES 
IN STOCK. 

Our small Safe is 
the besl low-priced 
safe in the market, 

GET PRICES, ETC. 




BEFORE BUYING. 



S. S. KIMBALL, 

577 Craig Street, - Montreal, 

THE EDINBURGH ROPERIE & 
SAILCLOTH CO, LIMITED 

LEITH. SCOTLAND. 

Manufac turers of / ~ ) 

Cordage of all kinds, Flax Sail- 
cloths, Tarpaulins and Water- 
Proof Cloths, Sewing Twines, 
Fishing Twines, Fishing Lines, 
Tying Twines, Etc., Etc. 

Represented by 

9 St. Peter St., 

MONTREAL 



DAVID INCUS, 



Phone Main 4359. 



AXE HANDLES 

Very heavy stocks 

Thoroughly seasoned goods 

We make a Can ship promptly and 

specialty of . . . supply the very best 

" Hand Shaved " 



Octagon 
Axe Handles 



Made by 
Indians 



being the largest dealers in Canada in this line 

Can give exceptional value. 

Have 5,000 dozen of these handles 

on hand ready for polishing. 

Write for prices. 



V 



Eastern Agent — W. B. Murdock, Amherst, N.S. 
Western Agent — Jno. Burns, Jr., Vancouver, B.C. 
Montreal Agent — Alexander Gibb, 22 St. John St. 



W. C. CRAWFORD 

Tilbury, Ont. 



FIRE TEST OF WIRE GLASS. 

WIRE glass windows and standard fire 
shutters of two different makes 
were recently subjected to three 
interesting tests in New York, under the 
supervision of the city building board, and 
in presence of several insurance men, with 
a view to showing the relative efficiencies of 
each. An expert insurance company's 
inspector, who was present, is quoted by 
Fire and Water as drawing the following 
conclusions from the tests : " The first test 
was unsatisfactory, for the reason that it is 
an open question whether or not the 
' Excelsior ' mattress in the test structure 
subjected to an exterior fire was ignited by 
radiation or by sparks coming through the 
only partly closed ventilators under the 
roof. Judging from the low temperature of 
the outer glass while the interior fire was in 
progress, it is hard to conclude that radiation 
ignited the mattress. 

" The other tests, the fire in the third 
being interior, were entirely satisfactory, and 
demonstrated that wire glass, when in 
approved frames similar to those used in 
these tests, is more reliable than the com 
mon iron shutters, and, in many cases, is 
capable of taking the place of standard 
shutters, provided that in windows over 
roofs, or when exposure is within, say, 15 
ft. of the risk, or when openings are in 
interior division walls, the panes of glass 
are double, with air space between. Even 
the double sashes, however, can hardly be 
considered the equal of the standard tin 
clad wooden shutter, on account of the 
chances of warping, the radiation of heat, 
and the chance of breakage by falling walls, 
etc. From other tests it has been shown 
that inflammable material should be kept 
at a distance ot about 4 ft. from the window 
when single panes are used, and, at about 
15 in., with double ventilated panes. The 
softening point of wired glass is claimed to 
be about 3,000, a temperature seldom 
reached by an exposing fire — while the 
melting point of ordinary window glass is 
from 800 to i.ooo." 



KEEP ON. 



One little step won't take you far, 

You've got to keep on walking ; 
One word won't tell just what you are, 

You've got to keep on talking ; 
One inch won't make you very tall, 

You've got to keep on growing ; 
One small ad. won't do it all, 

You've got to keep them going. 
— W. H. Black, in Advertising Experience. 

A BEARISH BUSINESS MAN. 

" Harry," she said thoughtfully. 

"What is it?" responded the worried 
business man, shortly. 

" I wish you would rearrange your busi- 
ness a little bit." 

"How ?" 

"So as to be a bear on the stock ex- 
change instead of at home." — Exchange. 



ORDER BY BRAND 

When you order horse nails be 
sure and name the brand you want. 
Some brands pay the dealer more 
profit than others, especially low- 
priced nails. 

The brand that affords the most 
profit will usually be sent by the 
dealer if no particular brand or 
maker is specified by you. If you 
want the best horse nails you must 
be prepared to pay the best price ; 
don't make any mistake on that 
point. The best article costs the 
most to produce and always de- 
mands the best price. The "Q" 
Brand of Horse Nails have for the 
past 36 years been accepted as the 
standard, and therefore the best 
Horse Nails in Canada, and for 
this reason have always command- 
ed the best price. 



^vORSf 



^tD/S/^ 




^ 

V 



4- 
-9 



WMARK 

HORSE NAILS 

MONTREAL 






No maker of Horse Nails in 
Canada has ever, or can ever hope 
to obtain one farthing more for 
their Horse Nails than our selling 
price. The fact of their selling at 
lower prices than we do may be ac- 
cepted as a confession on their 
part that their goods are not worth 
any more than what they ask. We 
leave to other makers the work of 
making "cheap" nails. Our aim 
shall be, as always, to produce only 
the best possible nail than can be 
manufactured ; we sincerely believe 
the "C" Brand to be such, and 
worth the price asked for it. Please 
specify for the "Q" Brand and see 
that you get it with our name in 
full on each box. 



Canada Horse Nail Co. 

MONTREAL. 



24 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HEATING and PLUMBING 



f DIFFERENCE IN BIDS FOR WORK. 

DISKING the last three months we 
have received several letters in 
which the writers bemoan the fact 
that they had tendered for certain work, 
and had made their bids so low that scarce- 
ly good wages could be made, yet a rival 
contractor carried off the job by offering to 
do it at a figure that would not much more 
than pay for the material. One writer, 
who lives in a populous and enterprising 
town west of Chicago, says : " I tendered 
for a building that, according to my 
figures, which were made carefully, would 
cost $9,430.00. I placed my figures at 
$9,400, to make even money. Five other 
parties tendered for the work, and, I may 
add. 1 did not get it. Now I am not in 
much trouble because I did not get the 
work, but 1 am at a loss to know how it 
is, that another contractor, whose experi- 
ence is not so long or so broad as mine, 
and whose facilities for doing work are not 
nearly so good as mine, should be able to 
do work so much lower than 1 can ! If this 
contractor who got the work possesses any 
magic recipe for making and manufactur- 
ing material and placing it I want to know 
of it, and will be willing to pay a good 
price for the recipe. Now, sir. as an 
editor is supposed to know everything and 
to be able to answer any question asked of 
him, I take the liberty of asking you if 
such a recipe exists, and if so, how much 
will I have to pay for a copy and when 1 
can get it V 1 give you a list of amounts 
tendered for the work 1 speak of : 

First tender #,10,650 

Second tender 10,206 

Third tender, mine 9,400 

Fourth tender 8,600 

Fifth tender 8,000 

Sixth tender 6.640 

" These are the mystic figures. The 
S('>.(>10 took the cake. How is the ' trick 
done? ' Our humorous correspondent, it 

he has contracted much, must have " run " 
against this condition before, as it is a 
common thing for tenders to differ all the 
way from 10 to 50 per cent. Why this is 
so is a question as difficult as a Chinese' 
puzzle. Perhaps the $6,640 man was right 
arid the other five fenders wrong. The 
ways of the general estimator arc wonder- 
fully mysterious and beyond all human 
comprehension.— National Builder. 



JOURNEYMEN PLUMBERS SCARCE. 

Ample proof of the activity of building 
operations throughout Ontario can easily be 
secured just now. In Toronto all ol the 
large plumbing houses find difficulty in, 
getting the number of workmen necessary 
to complete their contracts within the time 
specified, and at least one house has been 
compelled to refuse taking new work which 
would demand immediate attention, as they 
have in hand as much as they can look 



after. The value of building permits taken 
out in Toronto to date this year ( exclud- 
ing the $1,000,000 hotel permit), is nearly 
$250,000 in excess of that taken out to this 
time last year. The same conditions are 
■true in other cities, particularly in Ottawa, 
where building trades have been active all 
summer. In Brockville there is a shortage 
of journeymen plumbers, and master plumb- 
ers of that place were in Toronto and Ham- 
ilton last week looking for help. And in 
the towns there is a general improvement in 
the plumbing trade, as there is a growing 
demand for houses with modern improve- 
ments. In Sault Ste. Marie the building 
boom has given an opportunity for two 
Toronto boys, Culliton & Anstey. formerly 
with Purdy, Mansell fc Co.. to start in 
business. It is not yet six months since 
they opened out there, but they already 
have twelve men in their employ and are 
kept busy with new work. It is, in fact, 
the demand for men in smaller centres that 
has led to the scarcity of help in the cities. 



SOME BUILDING NOTES. 

A new hotel is being built at Bath, Out. 
C. Asmussen is erecting a residence at 
Berlin, Ont. 

The foundation of Toronto's big hotel is 
now being laid. 

Casper Bradley has started to build a 
residence in Merritton, Ont. 

Mrs. Wetzel), of St. John, N.B., intends 
erecting a residence at Bedford, N.S. 

John Dunlop, architect, Kossland, B.C., 
is preparing plans for a new school in that 
place. 

C. T. Maxwell, contractor, St. John, N. 
B., has started to build a new gaol at 
Woodstock, N.B. 

A new house with modern improvements 
is being built in Kossland, B.C., by con- 
tract oi' •). .1. Woods, for Conductor Irving, 
of the C.P.R. 

It is rumored about Montreal that J. N. 
Nash, formerly manager of Proctor's the- 
atrical enterprises in Montreal, is looking 
for a site for a new theatre in that city. 



TO CLEAN MARBLE. 

Brush the dust off with a piece of 
chamois, then apply with a brush a good 
coat of gum arabic about the consistency 
of thick mucilage, expose it to the sun or 
wind to dry. In a short time it will peel 
off. If all the gum should not peel off. 
wash it with clean water and a clean cloth. 
It' the first application does not have the 
desired effect, it should be tried again. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING NOTES. 

The Oshawa Oas Co., Limited, Oshawa, 
Ont.. have been incorporated. 

MacColl's Electrical Works. Ottawa, have 
been slightly damaged by fire. 

Strachan Bros., plumbers. Nelson, B.C., 
have been succeeded by E. K. Strachan. 

The Amalgamated Sheet Metal Workers of 
Montreal and The Montreal Plumbers' and 
Steamfittcrs' Union will hold a joint pic- 
nic at Otterburn Park, on August 10. 



A ROOFING PROBLEM. 

From J. & C, Troy, Ala. — We have a 
roofing problem which we wish to solve, 
and if The Metal Worker will kindly give 
us the desired information we shall be 
thankful. The architects through this sec- 
tion, in specifying the method of putting 
on fiat veranda and deck roofs, where 20 x 
28 tin is used, require that it shall be pu' 
on flat, lock seamed and soldered on botj 
sides, and the same nailed to the sheath- 
ing. The question is, can The Metal 
Worker, or any of its readers, tell us how 
it can be done in a skillful and workman- 
like manner ? We think we are practical 
roofers, but this gets ahead of us. 

NOTE. — In some sections of the country, 
instead of flat seam roofing being put on a 
sheet at a time, the tin is prepared in 
rolls. Usually it is soldered on but one 
side, although it is often painted on the 
under side. In applying the tin to the roof, 
a l-2incli edge is turned up along one side 
of the strip and turned down on the other. 
The strip is then fastened by nails being 
driven close in under the edge which is 
turned, and the closer the nails are placed 
toe ether the more easily and strongly the 
seam ran be soldered. Tinned nails should 
be used for this purpose. It may be that 
the architects desire to have the tin put ap 
in rolls for this class of work, and has e the 
seams soldered on both top and bottom 
sides.— Metal Worker. 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED. 

Building permits have been issued in To- 
ronto for the $1,000,000 Palace Hotel on 
King street; for a $3,600 house on Walker 
avenue, for Capt. Trigge ; a $4,000 store at 
the corner of Bloor and Marquette streets. 
and four dwellings on Marquette street, 
near Bloor, to cost $7,200, for B. G. Aus- 
tin ; a $2,500 warehouse at 289 Arthur- 
street, for J . A. Goddard ; two $] ,500 
dwellings on Gladstone avenue, near Kind 
say, for S. F. Aberdeen ; a $1,500 work- 
shop on Duffcrin street, south of King 
street, for The Dominion Bridge Company; 
and for a $1,000 dwelling at the northeast 
corner of Queen street and Waverley Road, 
for J. Jenkins. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING 
CONTRACTS. 

■] . W. Hughes & Co., Montreal, have the. 
contract of the plumbing and heating of 
W. V. Dawson's new factory on Cathedral 
street. 

The Bennett & Wright Co., Limited, To- 
ronto, have contracts for alterations to 
plumbing, heating and draining the old 
Johnston building, corner of Bay and 
Front streets, and for electric wiring in the 
Sick Children's Hospital. 



Fire was discovered in the hardware store 
of R. & S. Pollard, Petrolia. Ont., at n: 
o'clock on Saturday evening, but though t".ie 
blaze was very close to several barrels of 
gasoline, petroleum, and other oils, the loss 
was kept down to $300 by prompt work. 
This was covered by insurance. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



25 



SITUATION VACANT. 



AN ASSISTANT IS WANTED IN THE ADVER- 
tising Department of Hardware and Metal 
Toronto. Preference will be given to a bright young man, 
fall of ideas, who has had a successful experience in a 
general hardware store. Apply, with references, experience 
and salary expected, to Hardware and Metal, 
Toronto. (31) 

BRITISH BUSINESS CHANCES. 

Firms desirous of getting into communication 
with British manufacturers or merchants, or who 
wish to buy British goods on the best possible 
terms, or who are willing to become agents for 
British manufacturers, are invited to send partic- 
ulars of their requirements for 

FREE INSERTION 
in " Commercial Intelligence," to the Editor 
SELL'S COMMERCIAL INTELLIGENCE,' 
168 Fleet Street, London, England. 

"Commercial Intelligence" circulates all over 
the United Kingdom amongst the best firms. Firms 
communicating should give reference as to bona 
fides. 

N.B. — A free specimen copy will be sent on re- 
ceipt of a post card. 




LOW TANK 
WATER CLOSET 
COMBINATIONS 
THE MOST PER- 
FECT ON THE 
MARKET 
NOISELESS IN 
ACTION 
BEAUTIFUL 
DESIGNS. 

Write for Cataiogue, 

^The James Morrison 
" Brass Mfg. Co. 

Limited 
TORONTO, ONT. 



$1.00 
AND A 
GOOD 
PROFI 




In springtime the farmer is busy with his sow- 
ing. In the autumn he is busy harvesting. 
Between seasons he gets a chance at his barns, 
fences, outhouses. Now is the time to interest 
#im in a paint for this work. It's easy to get 
thjejjprofit if you have the goods and have 
m right. 

RAMSAYS 
OUTSIDE PAINTS 

are not our high grade house paints, but they 
are paints made to paint barns, fences, roofs, 
bridges and all outhouses, and do the work 
right, too. There's a profit for you at one 
dollar a gallon, and if you want to please your 
farmer customers ask us for cards. 



A. Ramsay & Son 



PAINTMAKERS, 



Est'd 1842. 



MONTREAL. 



ONTARIO SILVER CO 



Limited, 



NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA. 

Manufacturers of 

Ask for our Catalogue and Quotations 



FLATWARE, CUTLERY and 
ELECTRO PLATE. . . . 




Ontario Nut Works, Paris 

BROWN & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

All sizes of Hot Pressed 
Nuts, Square and Hexagon. 






1 




FAIRBANKS STANDAR^. . 

SCALES ^^ 

Have you seen our New Scale Catalogue ? 

♦♦ 




FAIRBANKS COMPANY 

749 Craig St., MONTREAL. 






26 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



MANITOBA MARKETS. 

Winnipeg, July 22, 1901. 

HARDWARE AND PAINTS, OILS 
AND GLASS. 

HARDWARE trade is good in all lines. 
There is an advance of 10c. per iop 
lb. in bar iron. In barb wire the' 
supply is still short. It will take 400 car* 
loads of twine for the crop. The price at 
Winnipeg is : Sisal, 9c. ; manila, 11 to 
I2#c. The mail service is demoralized. 
The weather has continued good for crops 
throughout the week, and the prospects 
continue of the most favorable character. 
Business also is good in all lines, and though 
money is scarcer than could be desired, 
still, bank paper is being fairly met. 
Quotations for the week are as follows : 

Barbed wire, 100 lb S3 45 

Plain twist 3 45 

Staples 3 95 

Oiled annealed wire 10 3 95 

" n 4 00 

12 4 05 

13 4 20 

14 4 35 

15 4 45 
Wire nails, 30 to 60 dy, keg 3 5° 

" 16 and 20 360 

10 3 60 

8 3 70 

6 3 75 

4 3 9° 

3 4 15 

Cut nails, 30 to 60 dy 3 10 

" 20 to 40 315 

" 10 to 16 3 20 

8 325 

6 3 3° 

4 3 4° 

3 3 75 

Horsenails, 45 per cent, discount. 

Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No 1 4 65 

No. 2 and larger 4 4° 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 4 90 

No. 2 and larger 4 4° 

Steel, No. o to No. 1 495 

No. 2 and larger 4 70 

Bar iron, $2.60 basis. 
Swedish iron, $5.00 basis. 

Sleigh shoe steel 3 25 

Spring steel 3 25 

Machinery steel 3 75 

Tool steel, Black Dialtapnd, 100 lb 8 50 

Jessop . . . . f 13 00 

Sheet iron, black, 10 to 20 gauge, 100 lb. 3 50 

20 to 26 gauge .'•...- 3 75 

28gauge .1^ 4 00 

Galvanized American*^© gauge..,,. 2 54 

18 to 22 gauge ... ••••••„ • * 4 50 

24 gauge 4 75 

26 gauge Ky , 5 00 

28gauge 5 25 

Genuine Russian, lb %. 12 

Imitation " " 8 

Tinned, 24 gauge, 100 lb *.. 7. 75 

26gauge 800 

28 gauge 8 50 

Tinplate, IC charcoal, 20 x 28, box 10 75 

IX " 1275 

IXX " 1475 

Ingot tin 33 

Canada plate, 18 x 21 and 18 x 24 3 25 

Sheet zinc, cask lots, 100 lb 7 co 

Broken lots 7 50 

Pig lead, 100 lb 6 00 

Wrought pipe, black up to 2 inch 50 an 10 p.c. 

" Over 2 inch 50 p.c. 

Rope, sisal, 7-16 and larger $11 00 

H 11 5° 

" % and 5-16 1200 

Manila, 7-16 and larger 14 00 

X 14 5° 

" % and 5-16 1500 

Solder 20 

Cotton Rope, all sizes, lb 17 

Axes, chopping $ 7 5° to l2 °° 

" double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 

Screws, flat head, iron, bright 87 A 

Round" " 82K 

Flat "brass 80 

Round " " 75 

Coach 57 J* p.c 



Bolts, carriage 55 p.c. 

Machine 55 p.c. 

Tire 60 p.c 

Sleigh shoe '. 65 p.c. 

Plough 40 p.c. 

Rivets, iron 50 p.c. 

Copper, No. 8 35 

' Spades and shovels 40 p.c. 

Harvest tools 50, and 10 p.c. 

Axe handles, turned, s. g. hickory, doz.. $2 50 

No. 1 1 50 

No. 2. 1 25 

Octagon extra 1 75 

^% No. 1 . . . . . . ^Jf 1 25 

■ Files common 70, and 10 p.c. 

Diamond ......' 60 

Ammunition,. cartridges, Dominion R.F. 50 p.c. 

Dominion, OF. , pistol 30 p.c. 

military 15 p.c. 

American R.F 30 p.c. 

C. F. pistol s p.c. 

C.F. military 10 p.c. advance. 

Loaded shells : 

16 50 
18 00 
21 00 



Eley's soft, 12 gauge black, 
chilled, 12 guage. . . . 

soft, 10 guage 

chilled, 10 guage 

Shot, Ordinary, per 100 lb 

Chilled 

Powder, F. F. , keg 

F.F.G 



23 00 

6 25 

6 75 

4 75 

5 00 

Tinware, pressed, retinned. . ...... 75 and 2A p.c. 

plain 70 and 15 p.c. 

Graniteware, according to quality 50 p.c. 



PETROLEUM. 



Water white American 
Prime white American. , 
Water white Canadian . , 
Prime white Canadian. 



25 Ac. 
24c. 
22c. 
2ic. 



PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS. 



Turpentine, pure, in barrels $ 61 

Less than barrel lots 66 

Linseed oil, raw 92 

Boiled 95 

Lubricating oils, Eldorado castor 25 A 

Eldorado engine 24K 

Atlantic red 27 A 

Renown engine 41 

Black oil 23 'A to 25 

Cylinder oil (according to grade) . . 55 to 74 

Harness oil 61 

Neatsfoot oil $ 1 00 

Steam refined oil 85 

Sperm oil 1 50 

Castor oil per lb. n'A 

Glass, single glass, first break, 16 to 25 

united inches 2 25 

26 to 40 per 50 ft. 2 50 

41 to 50 " 100 ft. 550 

51 to 60 " " " 600 

61 to 70 per ico-ft. boxes 6 50 

Putty, in bladders, barrel lots per lb. 2% 

kegs " 2% 

White lead, pure per cwt. 7 00 

No 1 " 6 75 

Prepared paints, pure liquid colors, ac- 
cording to shade and color, per gal. $1.30 to $1.90 



NEW CENTURY IDEAS. 

The Toronto Exhibition, to be held from 
August 26 to September 7, announces that 
its principal characteristic will be the adop- 
tion of New Century Ideas. The pom- 
pom will be on view, wireless telegraphy 
will be shown in practical use off the shore 
to passing vessels, magnificent displays of 
illuminating effects will be made, recently 
announced developments in electricity will 
be shown, demonstrations will be made in 
the cultivation of the sugar beet, modern 
methods of rescuing at sea will be illus- 
trated, manoeuvres with latter-day artillery 
will take place ; in fact, the military will be 
very much in evidence in all its branches, 
while the handy-man and the marines will 
also be used largely in the off-shore opera- 
tions and the brilliant nightly spectacle, the 
Bombardment of the Taku Forts by Inter- 
national forces. An International Military 
Tattoo will be the feature of the opening 
night, when a large body of troops will be 
utilized. A strong exhibit of French-Can- 
adian cattle, as well as of Pan-American 
live stock, is to be made. Greatly reduced 



rates on the railways and steamboats have 
been arranged for, and no better time for 
visiting Toronto and the Pan-American, or 
the former alone, could be desired than be- 
tween August 26 and September 7. This 
year Toronto will distribute upwards of 
§35,000 in premiums and spend §30,000 in 
special attractions. 



THE MARITIME BOARD OF TRADE. 

The annual session of the Maritime 
Board of Trade opens in Chatham, N. 
B., on August 21, and at a recent meeting 
of the latter board ways and means of 
entertaining the delegates were considered, 

The suggestion that the visiting del! 
gates should be given an excursion on the 
river was favored, and Hon. Senator Snow- 
ball said he would place a steamer at the 
committee's disposal for that purpose. 

On motion of \V. C. Winslow, seconded by 
James Nicol, this offer was accepted and 
a vote of thanks tendered to Mr. Snowball. 

W. C. Winslow moved that the Town 
Council be asked to cooperate with the local 
board of trade in making arrangements for 
the coming visitors. 

On motion of Mayor Snowball, the follow- 
ing committee on arrangements was ap- 
pointed : 

Secretary J. D. B. F. Mackenzie, George 
Watt, W. C. Winslow, R. A. Murdoch, J. L. 
Stewart. 

President Loggie said that the board 
ought to suggest matters for discussion by 
the Maritime Board, such suggestions to be 
included in the list of subjects to be pre- 
pared by the Maritime Council in readiness 
for the Maritime Board's annual session. 

President Loggie, Senator Snowball, Jas. 
Nicol and J. L. Stewart were appointed a 
committee to suggest, within a week, ques- 
tions for discussion by the Maritime Board. 

Delegates from this Board to the Maritime 
Board were appointed as follows : W. B. 
Snowball. George Watt, M. S. Hocken, W. 
C. Winslow, J. L. Stewart, R. A. Murdoch, 
J. D. B. F. Mackenzie. 



EARLY-CLOSING ITEMS. 

The principal dry goods merchants, boot 
and shoe dealers, and jewelers, of Chatham. 
Out., have agreed to close their stores at 1 
p.m. on Thursdays, until September 1. 

The clerks of Nelson, B.C., have formed a 
union and are pressing for a half holiday 
on Thursday afternoons. 

The Merchants' Association, of Gait, Ont., 
have decided to close their stores every 
Thursday froin 1 o'clock for the remainder 
of the day and evening, in place of the 
afternoon only. The change went into 
effect last week, and will continue until 
September 15. 

Many Fredericton merchants, grocers and 
others, believe that it would be the part of 
economy and wisdom to close their stores 
evenings during the summer months. Con- 
certed action is all that is required to bring 
about such a desirable end. The early clos- 
ing now extends to the hardware, dry goods 
and boot and shoe stores and the pro- 
prietors of these establishments believe that 
they are not only saving money thereby, as 
the expense of keeping open evenings is 
greater than the profits from the insignjfl 
cant sales ; and more than this the pro- 
prietors and the clerks are allowed an hour 
or two out of doors in the evenings for the 
promotion of their health and pleasure.— 
Gleaner, Fredericton, N.B. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



27 



PORTLAND 
CEMENTS 

Best German. Belgian and 
English Brands. 

Fire Bricks, Fire Clay, 
Flue Linings, 
Drain Pipes, 
'Calcined Plaster, 
Granite Hard Wall Plaster, 
Wheelbarrows, 
Mortar Stains. 

A full stock of Builders' and Conlractors' 
Supplies. Write for Quotations. 



W. ncNally & Co., 

MONTREAL. 



DAVID PHILIP 

MANUFACTURERS' AGENT 

362K Main St., - WINNIPEG. 

Correspondence invited from manufacturers of Staple or 
Heavy Hardware, Iron or Steel Bolts and Nuts, etc., 
ei'her by carrying stock in Winnipeg or by selling direct 
from factory. 

GOOD REFERENCES. 



THE B. GREENING WIRE CO., u 

HAMILTON, ONT., AND MONTREAL, QUE. 



MITED 



WfflfflMmm 






MANUFACTURERS 
OF 

Wire Rope 

of every description and 
for all purposes. 



Lang's Patent Wire 

Rope for 

Colliery and Mining 

Use. 




STOVE P 




i t o v e l 
for 
'which extend from 8 to 
16 inches; also showing 
Register placed in 
thimble after removing 
pipe, for covering up 
hole or ventilating 
room, opened or closed 
as desired. Write us 
for catalogue showing 
full line of these goods 
and our other hardware 
specialties. 

THE COLLINS MFG. CO., 

34 Adelaide Street West TORONTO 



t^ejtobin Hood 
'owder Company 

If you want the best Trap or Game load in 
the world, buy "Robin Hood Smokeless," 
in " Robin Hood " Shells. It is quick, safe, 
and reliable. Try it for pattern and pene- 
tration from forty to seventy yards against 
any powder on the market. We make the 
powder, we make the shells, and we load 
them. Write for our booklet, " Powder 
Facts." 



The Robin Hood Powder 
Company — -~ 

SWANTON, VT. 



The 
Mower 

THAT WILL KILL 
ALL THE WEEDS 
IN YOUR LAWNS 

If you keep the 
weeds cut so they do 
not go to seed, and 
cut your grass with- 
out breaking the small feeders of roots, the grass 
will become thick and weeds will disappear. The 
Clipper will do it. 




CANADIAN PATENT FOR SALE. 
SEND FOR CATALOGUE AND PRICES. 



Clipper Lawn Mower Co 



BURMAN & SONS' clippers 



Established 1871. 



for Horsemen 



BIRMINGHAM, ENG. — B — 




NO. 297. 



NO. 3-POWER CLIPPER, with "Wrist Joint. 

("The Czar of Russia. 
As supplied UK The King of Denmark. 
(Earl Roberts, Etc., Etc. 





LEOPOLD" TOILET. 



THE "WARWICK" 

CLIPPER. 

Cuts over three teeth. 

As supplied to 

His Majesty's 
War Department. 



NORRISTOWN, Pa. 



SEND FOR PRICE LIST AND TERMS. 

DELORME BROS., Agents, D ^7.Y t '. M Montreal 



28 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



SPECULATING IN CREDIT. 

By F. C. Brunhouse. 



THE queiy naturally arises " Is there 
such a thing- as credit speculation? 
From the reckless way in which 
some people grant credit we are led to 
believe that such is the case. In conversa- 
tion with a prominent attorney, recently, 
regarding commercial failures, speaking from 
an extensive experience with debtors and 
creditors, lie stated : The creditor is to 
blame to a large degree for a very great 
many of the difficulties arising between the 
debtor and creditor. Over zealous to do a 
large business, he neglects to be cautious, 
conservative, and fails to correctly discrim- 
inate between those whom he should and 
should not trust. 

In analyzing this statement, let 



according to the confidence you have in the 
ability and integrity of A, to 5 per cent, of 
Ins net working capital. If such a rule 
were adhered to, a great many of our pres- 
ent-day " lack-of-capital " failures would be 
avoided. We all can do a great deal to 
assist A to keep within his limits. Over- 
zealousness on the part of very many do a 
large business, disregarding the safeguards 
which should lie thrown around every mer- 
cantile house to insure its success, leads to 
speculation in extending credit. To this 
reckless procedure there can be but one 
result, failure. 

It is worth while to recall a remark made 
by a man who amassed a fortune. " I 



never speculate in matters of business." It 

ndeavor to dfscover in what respects it^w' 8 ^* "^ ^ com ' s,i t0 P ursue - 
correct. To be equitable we must admit 
at the outset that there is a great deal of 
truth embodied in this statcmctHh^ykefliTl* 
problems, whether political, social or com- 
mercial, there are two sides of this ques- 
tion, viz., the debtors and the creditors. 



ajn,.\i.s>it not true that there are 
iss- or persons (you will find them 
everywhere.), loolwm^fqr»tlje lambs, and by 
artful meads attempting*, nether- by .giving 



any wonder that our attorney friend views 
the relation of debtor and creditor in this 
light ? 

This is only one feature of how these 
sharps operate, and are usually the kind of 
cases that find their way into the attor- 
ney s hands. It does appear that credit is 
too cheap, and, as it is commonly said : 
"I can get all the goods I want. If you 
will not trust me, others will." It 
behooves the credit man, as well as the 
business man, to carefully scrutinize all new 
business, and if perchance you open an 
account with your new-found friend, keep 
your eves on him until you are convinced 
that he is a solid man and worthy of yomr 
confidence. Better do a small busi, s 
>ahl\ than a large business on spe>»» 
tion. Learn to discriminate between "the 
worthy and the unworthy, when, whom and 
how- much to trust, and when you have 
decided that point, stick to it.— Commerce 
and Accounts. 



eat sho^v of 



The purpose of this article will be to point 
out a few of the many errors that have 
crept into our modern ideas of doing busi- 
ness, and show how it is possible to specu- 
late in credit. This, of necessity, was to 
a certain degree the condition under which 
our forefathers transacted their business, 
but in a time when profits were consider- 
ably larger than they are at present. A 
man to indulge in such methods to-day, 
with all the advantages of commercial agen- 
cies and other sources of information open 
to him, is reckless, to say the least. Greed 
for the mighty dollar and business has been 
the death-knell of many a business man. 

In what respect, then, is the creditor to 
blame for the difficulties arising between 
the debtor and the creditor ? 

We will take a hypothetical case to illus- 
trate. Assuming that A is the debtor, 
doing business in one of our smaller towns, 
possesses the average ability usually found 
in that class of merchants, and a man of 
moderate means, P., C, 1), K, F, G, and 
we might continue indefinitely because they 
are so numerous, are the creditors. In due 
season, B, C, |), et al., start out their 
salesmen with the injunction, "Don't fail 
to sell A all the goods he will buy," which 
instinct ion eveiy man obeys, as a matter of 
course ; every fellow's goods are the best : 
ail have bargains galore. A buss here and 

buys there, ami in the course of time he 
finds himself overloaded with a large stock, 
in which all his good money is invested ; 
and for which, perhaps, he will be unable 
to realize 51) per cent, on the dollar. Time 
rolls on ; his condition gets worse : he is 
unable to meet his obligations, and he is 
brought to realize that he is insolvent. If 
he is an honest man, he will stop short and 
transfer his business to his creditors. If. 
however, he is indifferent or inclined the 
other way, he will make an effort to take 
care of No. 1. How well he succeeds a 
great many have learned to their sorrow. 
What is the remedy? When A appears for 
your consideration, don't think that you 
are the only people that are going to sell 
to him, but take into consideration that 
there are others ; obtain, if dossible, and, 
in a doubtful rase, insist upon it, a state- 
ment which will show A's net working 
capital. Then follow the common sense 
course. Unless you know positively from 
how many houses A is buying, in justice in 
others, as well as yourself, you must adopt 
a rule such as in vogue with credit insur- 
ance companies, of limiting your sales, 



false statement St by 
wealth and [SSrOsperity, to secure ^Jsd^t*? 
To illustrate, we" will cite a case. kT/ point 
of a party who operated in this- i'ashion. 
He made a great display, used attractive 
stationery, furnished doctored statements 
under the direction of a shyster attorney, 
purchased goods in small quantities and 
paid them in ten days, gradually increasing 
his purchases and paying promptly, until 
he had his game, when he wound up with 
purchasing all the goods he could get, 
which were sold at ridiculously low prices 
to close quickly, and when the bills became 
due and attempts were made to collect, the 
accounts were returned as uneollectable. All 
this was in the face of adverse rating's of 
this party by both Dun and Hradstreet. It 
seems almost incredible ; one is amazed at 
the cupidity of some business men. Is it 



CHARACTER THE TRUE TEST. 

President Ramsay, of The Hide and 
Leather Dank, New York, recently expressed 

himself as follows in a speech before the 
New York Credit Mens' Association: 

" li you want to get down to the facts 
as to whether it is sale to trust a man, find 
who the man is, what his character is, how 
he lives, and how he treats his neighbor, 
and see that he is a faith good man, then 
it is sale to trust him. You cannot make 
a man sign a mortgage on his wife and 
children : such a man will dupe you. If 
you find him honorable in his deportment, 
honorable in the town where he lives, I 
won't ask that he drinks water all the time: 
ht him be f.ml-, straight m his v\ id-.s ol 
life, anil (hat man is prettj near safe to 
trust, and 1 think you will all bear me 
out." 



American Sheet Steel Company 

Battery Park Building 
New York 

Manufacturers of all varieties of 

Iron and Steel Sheets 
Black and Galvanized 
Plain and Painted 
Flat, Corrugated and 
"V" Crimped 

Apollo Best Bloom Galvanized 
W. Dewees Wood Company's 

Patent Planished Iron 
W. Dewees Wood Company's 

Refined Smooth Sheets 
Wellsville Polished Steel Sheets 



Representatives for Canada 
B. & S. H. Thomp on & Company 
26 St. Sulpice Street 
Montreal 



. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



29 



U 



MIDLAND 



JJ 



BRAND 



Foundry Pig Iron 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as fuel, "Mid- 
land" will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



:> 



Write for Prices to Sales Agents: 



L.ummond, McCall & Co. 

MONTREAL, QUE. 



or to 



Canada Iron Furnace Co. 



MIDLAND, ONT. 



Limited 



"The Peerless" 



is the best Bolster Spring ever 
produced. A fine line for the 

hardware trade. Wr ite Us For Prices, 




James Warnock & Co. 



Qalt, Ont. 



CUKHEfiT MARKET QUOTATIONS 



July 56, 1901. 
These prices are for such qualities and 
quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 
Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list as the desire 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

Tin. 

Lamb and Flag and Straits— 

56 and 28 lb. ingots, per lb. 31% 32 

Tinplates. 

Charcoal Plates— Bright 

M.L.S., equal to Bradley. Pi r box 

I.C., usual sizes $6 75 

I.X., " 8 25 

I.X.X., " 9 75 

Famous— 

1.0 6 75 

I.X 8 55 

I.X.X 9 75 

Raven & Vulture Grades— 

I.C., usual sizes 4 75 

I.X., " 5 75 

I.X.X " 6 75 

I.XXX., " 7 75 

D.C., 12%xl7 4 25 

D.X 5 00 

D.X.X 5 75 

Coke Plates— Bright 
Bessemer Steel— 

I.C. , usual sizes 4 2o 

I.C., special sizes, base 4 50 

20x28 9 00 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 
Dean or J. G. Grade— 

I.O., 20x28, 112 sheets 9 00 

I.X., Terne Tin 1100 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 

Cookley Grade— Per lb. 
X X. , 14x56, 50sheetbxs) 

" 14x60, " > .... C6% 

•' 14x65, " ) 

Tinned Sheets 

72x30 up to 24 gauge 07% 

26 " 08 

28 " 08% 

Iron and Steel. 

Common Bar, per 100 lbs 185 190 

Refined " " 2 35 

Borse Shoe Iron ' 2 35 

Hoop steel, 1% to 3 in. base, 

extras for smaller sizes 3 13 

Sleigh Shoe Steel " base .... 2 10 

TireSteel 2 33 2 50 

Reeled Machinery 3 00 

Toe Calk Steel 2 85 3 00 

T. Firth &Co's tool steel, per lb 12% 13 

Jessop's tool Steel 12% 13 

Morton'B tooHteel C 12V, 13 

Black Diamond and " B C," 

tool steel 10 11 

Drill Steel, per lb 18 1U 

Boiler Tubes. 

1%-incb 12% 

2 " 13 

2% " 15 

3 " 16 

3% " 20 

4 " 25 

fe Steel Boiler Plate. 

'/*i^K 2 50 2 60 

3-16nW 2 60 2 70 

% inoh and thicker 2 50 2 60 

Black Sheet*. 

Com. D.F1. 

18gauge 2 85 3 00 

20 gauge 2 85 3 CO 

22to24 " 2 95 3 25 

26 " 3 05 3 50 

28 " 3.15 



Canada Plate;. 

All dull, 52 sheets 2 90 

Half polished 3 00 

All bright 3 JO 

Black pipe— Iron Pipe. 

% " 4 65 

% inch 3 40 

% " 345 

% " 3 70 

\ " 3 85 

1 " 5 40 

1% " 7 70 

1% " 9 10 

2 '• 12 50 

2% " 22 75 

3 " 30 

3V 2 " 37 50 

4 " 42 75 

4 1 .. " 51 50 

5 " " 57 50 

6 " 74 50 

Galvanized pipe— 

V, iDch 5 15 

y. " 5 50 

1 " 7 95 

1% " 10 80 

l'/ 2 " 12 95 

2 " 17 35 

Galvanized Sheets. 

Queen's 
G C. Comet. Amer. Head. 
16 gauge .... 4 00 3 75 

18 to 24 gauge 4 00 3 85 4 25 4 00 
26 " 4 25 4 10 4 25 4 25 

28 " 4 50 4 35 4 40 4 50 

Case lots 10 to 15c. less. 

28 gauge American equals 26 gauge English. 
Chain. 

Proof Coil, 3-16 in., per 1001b 

" V* " 8 00 8 50 

" 5-16 " " 4 70 5 00 

% " " 4 05 4 :o 

" 7-16 " " 3 90 4 X5 

% " " 3 70 4 10 

9-16 " " 3 65 4 C5 

" % " " 3 35 3 90 

•' % " " 3 60 4 10 

Halter, kennel and post chains, 40 to 40 and 

5 p.o. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Tie-out chains 6> p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 45 p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, dis- 
count 35 p c. 
Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis- 
count 40 p.c. 

Copper. 
Ingot 

English B. S., ton lots 17>4 

Lake Superior 

Bars. 
Cut lengths round, y 2 to % in. 23 25 
" round and square 

1 to 2 inches.... 23 25 
Sheet. 
Plain, 14 oz., and light, 16 

oz. , 14x48 and 14x60 21 14% 

Plain, 14 oz., and light, 16 

oz., irregular sizes 24% 25 

Tinned copper sheets 26 

Planished 32 

Braziers (In sheets.) 

4x6f t. 25 to 30 lbs. ea. , per lb 25 

" 35 to 45 " " .... 24 

50-lb. and above, " .... 23 
Boiler and T.K.Pitts 

Plain Tinned, per lb 28 

Spun.perlb 32 

Brass. 
Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge 10 per cent. 

Sheets, hard-rolled, 2x4 23 

Tubing, base, per t 23 

Zinc Spelter 

Foreign, per lb 05% 06 

Domestio " 



Zinc Sheet. 

5 cwt. casks 00 6 % 

Partcasks CO 6% 

Lead. 

Imported Pig, per lb 04V4 14% 

Bar.llb 05% 05% 

Sheets, 2% lbs. sq. ft., by .... r6V4 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lbs., " .... 06 

Note.— Cut sheets % cent per lb. extra. 
Pipe, by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists 
at 7c. per lb. and 30 p.c. dis. f.o.b. Toron'o. 

Note.— Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 
8-ft. lengths lists at 7% cents. 

Shot. 

Common, $6.50 per 1C0 lb. ; chilled, $7.00 
per 100 lb. ; buck, seal and ball, $7.50. Dis- 
count, 17% p.c. Prices are f o.b. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Terms 3 per cent, cash, freights equalized. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings. 
Discount, 60 and 10 per cent, on medium and 
extra heavy, and 60 per cent, on light. 

Solder. Per lb. Per lb. 
Bar half-and-half, guarant'd .... 19% 
Bar half-and-half, coniirer'l — 19 

Refined 18% 

Wiping 18 

Note.— Prices of this graded according to 
quantity. The prices of other qualities of 
solder in the market indicated by private 
brauds vary according to composition. 

Antimony. 

Cookson's, per lb 10/, 11 

White Lead . Per 100 lb. 

Pure 6 37 

No. 1 do 6 00 

No.2do 5 62% 

No.3 do 5 55 

No. 4 do * 87% 

Munro's Select Flake White 7 37% 

Elephant and Decorators' Pure 7 12% 

Brandram's B B. Genuine 7 50 

" " Decorative 7 00 

" No. 1 6 50 

" No. 2 5 75 

Red Lead. 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt $5 50 

Genuine, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 5 75 

No. 1, 560 lb. casks, per cwt 5 25 

No. 1,1001b. kegs, per cwt 5 00 

White Zinc Paint. 

Elephant Snow White. 08 09 

Pure White Zinc 08 0(9 

No 1 06 07% 

No! 2 05 C6% 

Dry White Lead. 

Pure, casks 5 75 

Pure, kegs 6 25 

No. l.casks 5 50 

No. 1, kegs 5 00 

Prepared Paints. 

In %, % and 1 gallon tins. 

Pure, per gallon 1 25 

Second qualities,per gallon 1 10 

Barn (inbbls.) 75 85 

The Sherwin-Wijliams PaintB 145 

Canada Paint Co's Pure 125 

Toronto Lead & Color Cos Pure 1 25 

Sanderson Pearcy's Pure 1 20 

Stewart & Wood's Champion Pure. 1 20 

Colors in Oil. 

25 lb. tins, Standard Quality. 

Venetian Red, per lb 05 

Chrome Yellow 11 

Golden Ochre 06 

French " 05 

MarineBlack 09 

" Green 09 

Chrome " 08 

French Imperial Green.,,.,..., 09 



Colors, Dry. 

Yellow Ochre ( J.C. ) bbls.... 135 140 

Yellow Ochre J.F.L.S.), bbls ... 2 75 

Yellow Ochre (Royal) 110 115 

Brussels Ochre 2 00 

Venetian Red (best), per cwt. 180 190 

Knglish Oxides, per cwt 3 00 3 25 

American Oxides, per cwt.. 1 75 2 00 

Canadian Oxides, per cwt.,. . 175 2 00 

8uperMagnetioOxides,93p o. 2 00 2 25 

Burnt Sienna, pure, per lb 10 

" Umber, " " 10 

do Raw 09 

Drop Black, pure 09 

Chrome Yellows, pure 18 

Chrome Greens, pure, per lb 12 

Golden Ocbre 03%t 

Ultramarine Blue in 28-lb.. 

boxes, per lb 08 24 

Fire Proof Mineral, per 100 lb 100 

Genuine Eng.Litharge, per lb 07 

Mortar Color, per 100 lb 125 

English Vermillion 80 

Pure Indian Red, No. 45 1b 80 

Whiting, per 100 lb 55 

Bine Stone. 

Casks, for spraying, per b 07 

100-lb. lots, do. per lb 08 

Putty. 

Bulk in bbls. 1 90 

Bulk in less quantity 2 05 

Bladders in bbls 2 10 

Bladders in kegs, boxes or loose. ... 2 25 

Bladders in 25-lb. tins 2 35 

Bladders in 12%-lb. tins 2 65 

bladders in bu'kortios less than 10011)2 90 

Varnishes. 

In 5-gal. lots.). Per gal. 

Carriage, No. 1 2 90 3 30 

" body 8 00 9 00 

" rubbing 4 00 5 00 

Gold Size, Japan 3 00 3 40 

Brown Japan 2 40 2 80 

Elastic Oak 2 90 3 30 

Furniture, extra 2 40 2 80 

No. 1 160 2 00 

Hard Oil Finish 2 70 3 10 

Light Oil Finish 3 20 3 60 

Demar 3 30 3 70 

Shellac, white 4 40 4 80 

" orange 4 00 4 40 

Furniture Brown Japan 1 60 2 00 

Black Japan 2 40 2 8J 

" No. 1 1 60 2 00 

The Imperial Varnish & Color Co's., 
Limited Elastilite Varnish 1 gal. can, each. 
$3 Oi). 

Graniline Floor Finish per gal., $2.75. 

Maple Leaf Coach Enamels ; Size 1, $1 2) ; 
Size 2, 70c. ; Size 3, 4Jc. each. 

Castor Oil. 

East India, in cases, per lb. .0 10 10% 

" " small lots 10% 11 

Cod Oil, Etc. 

CodOilpergal 50 55 

PureOlive 120 

" Neatsfoot 90 

Glue. 

Cjmmon 08% 09 

French Medal 14 14% 

Cabinet sheet 12 13 

White, extra 18 20 

Gelatine 22 30 

Strip 18 20 

Coopers 19 20 

Huttner 18 



30 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Joseph Rodgers & Sons 

Limited 

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND. 

Each blade of our Goods bears the 
exact mark here represented. 



JAMES HUTTON & CO., MONTREAL 



SOLE AGENTS 

IN CANADA. 




I 

I 

I 
4 

A 

• ••• 

t 



HARDWARE. 

Ammunition. 

Cartridges. 

B. B Cap Dom. 50 and 5 per cent. 

Rim Fire Pistol, dis. 40 p. o., Amer. 

Rim Fire Cartridges, Dom., 50 and 5 p. o. 

Central Fire Pistol and Rifie, 10 P.O. Amer. 

Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes, Dom. 
30 per cent. 

Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dom., 15 and 5 per cent. 

Central Fire. Military and Sporting, Amer, 
add 5 p.c. to list. B.B. Caps, discount 40 
per cent. Amer. 

Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap" and 
" Dominion " grades, 25 per cent. Rival 
and Nitro, 10 p.c. advance on list. 

Brass Shot Shells, 55 per cent. 

Primers, Dom., 30 per cent. 

Wads per lb- 

Best thick white felt wadding, in %-lb 

bans 1 00 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

%-lb.bags 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 35 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 5U0each, 8 gauge 55 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin oard wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge 25 

Thin card wads in boxes of 1,000 
each, 8 gauge 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M. 

Hand smaller gauge 60 

9 and 1C gauges 70 

7 and 8 gauges 90 

5 and 6 gauges 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 gauges 1 65 

5 and 6 gauges 1 90 

Adzes. 

Discount, 20 per cent. 

Anvils. 



Wrights, 801b. and over 



10"'. 



VY ngnts. BU-in. ana over u iu"j 

Hay Budden, 80-lb. and over .... 09% 



Brook's, 



11% 



Augers. 

Gilmour's, discount 65 and 5 p.c. off list. 

Axes. 
Chopping Axes 

Single bit, perdoz 5 50 10 00 

Double bit, " 1100 18 00 

Bench Axes, 40 p.c. 
Broad Axes, 33% per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boy's Axes 5 75 6 75 

Splitting Axes 6 50 12 00 

Handled Axes 7 00 10 00 

Axle Grease. 

Ordinary, per gross 5 75 6 00 

Bestquality 13 00 15 00 

Bath Tubs. 

Zinc 6 00 

Copper, discount 15 p.c. off revised list 

Baths. 

Standard Enameled. 

5V,-inch rolled rim, 1st quality 25 00 

2nd " 21 00 

Anti-Friction Metal . 

"Tandem" A per lb. 27 

" B " 21 

C " 11% 

Magnolia Anti-Friction Metal, per lb. 25 
Frictionless metal, per lb 23 

SYRACUSE SMELTING WORKS. 

Aluminum, genuine 45 

Dynamo 29 

Special 25 

Aluminum, 99 p.c. pure "Syracuse .. 50 

Bells. 

Hand. 
Brass, 60 per cent. 
Niokel, 55 per cent. 



Cow. 
American make, discount 66% per oent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 
Door. 

Gongs, Sargant's 5 50 8 00 

" Peterboro', discount 45 per cent. 
Farm. 

American, each 125 3 00 

House. 

American, per lb 35 40 

Bellows. 

Hand, perdoz 3 35 4 75 

Moulders', per doz 7 50 10 00 

Blacksmiths', discount 40 per cent. 

Belting:. 
Extra, 60, 10 and 5 per cent. 
Standard, 70 per cent. 
No. 1, 70 and 10 p.c. 

Bits. 
Auger. 
Gilmour's, discount 60 and 5 per cent. 
Rockford, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings' Gen., net list. 
Car. 
Gilmour's, 47% to 50 per cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Damond, Shell, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Nail and Spike, perpross 2 25 5 20 

Blind and Bed Staples. 

All sizes, per lb 07 3 4 12 

Bolts and Nuts. Percent. 
Carriage Bolts, full square, Norway... 65 

" " full square 65 

Common Carriage Bolts, all sizes 60 

Machine Bolts, all sizes 60 

Coach Screws 70 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 72% 

Blank Bolts 60 

Bolt Ends 62% 

Plough Bolts 60 

Nuts, square 4 c. off 

Nuts, hexagon ; 4'4c. off 

Tire Bolts 67% 

Stove Bolts 67% 

Stove rods, per lb 5% to 6o. 

Nuts, io 5 J lb. lots %c. per lb extra, in less 
than 5J lb. lots, %c. extra. 

Boot Calks. 

Small and medium, ball, per M 4 25 

Small heel, per M 4 50 

Bright Wire Goods. 

Discount 6.% per cent. 

Broilers. 
Light, dis., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Reversible, dis., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Vegetable, per doz., dis. 37% per cent. 

HeniB, No. 8, " 6 00 

Henis,No.9, " 7 00 

Queen City " 7 50 00 

Butchers' Cleavers. 

German, per doz 6 00 1100 

American, per doz 12 00 20 00 

Building Paper, Etc. 

Plain building, per roll 30 

Tarred lining, per roll 40 

Tarred roofing, per 100 lb 1 65 

Coal Tar, per barrel 3 50 

Pitch, per 100-lb 85 

Carpet felt, per ton 45 10 

Bull Rings. 
Copper, $2.00 for 2% in. and $1.90 for 2 in. 

Butts. 
Wrought Brass, net revised iat 

Cast Iron. 
Loose Pin, dis., 60 per cent. 

Wrought Steel. 
Fast Joint, dis. 65, 10 and 2% per cont. 
Loose Pin, dis. 65, 10 and 2% per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, dis. 70, 70 and 5 per c nt. 
Gen. Bronzed, per pair 40 65 

Carpet Stretchers . 

American, per doz 100 150 

Bullard's, per doz 6 50 .... 

Castors. 
Bed, new list, dis. 55 to 57% percent. 
Plate, dis. 52% to 57% per cent. 

Cattle Leaders. 
Nos. 31 and 32, per gross 50 9 50 



Cement. 

Canadian Portland 2 50 2 80 

English " 3 00 

Belgian " 2 50 2 75 

Canadian hydraulio 1 25 1 50 

Chalk. 
Carpenters Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump, per owt 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon, per gross 14 18 

Chisels. 
Socket, Framing and Firmer. 
Broad's, dis. 70 per cent. 
Warnock's, dis. 70 per cent. 
P. S. & W. Extra 60, 10 and 5 p.c. 

Churns. 
Revolving Churns, metal frames— No. 0, $8— 
No. 1, 18.50— No. 2, $9.00— No. 3, $10.00— 
No. 4, $12.00— No. 5, $16.00 each. Ditto, 
wood frames— 20c. each less than above. 
Discounts : Delivered from factories, 58 
p.c. ; from stock in Montreal, 56 p.c. 
Terms, 4 months or 3 p.c. cash in 30 days. 
Clips. 
Axle dis. 65 per cent. 

Closets 

Plain Ontario Syphon Jet $16 00 

Emb. Ontario Syphon Jet 17 00 

Fittings net 1 00 

Plain Teutonic Syphon Washout. ... 10 00 
Emb. Teutonic Syphon Washout. ... 11 00 

Fittings net 1 25 

Low Down Teutonic, plain 16 00 

" " " embossed 17 00 

Plain Rlohelieu net 3 75 

Emb. Richelieu net 4 00 

Fittings net 1 25 

Liw Down Oat. Sy. Jet, plain net. . 19 50 
" " " •' " emb'd. net 20 50 

Closet connection net 1 25 

Basins, round, 14 in 1 00 

" oval, 17 x 14 in 2 50 

■' " 19x15 in... 3 75 

Discount 40 p.c, except on net figures. 
Compasses, Dividers, Etc. 
American, dis. 62% to 65 per cent. 

Cradles, Oral ii . 
Canadian, dis. 25 to 33% per cent. 
Crosscut Saw Handles. 

S. & D., No. 3, per pair 17% 

" 5, " 22% 

...15 
...20 



Boynton pattern " 

Door Springs. 

Torrey'sRod, per doz (15 p.c.) 2 00 

Coil, per doz 88 1 60 

English, per doz 2 00 4 00 

Draw Knives. 
Coach and Wagon, dis. 50 and 10 per cent. 
Carpeatere, dis. 70 per cent. 
Drills. 
Hand and Breast. 
Millar's Falls, per doz. net list. 
DRILL BITS. 
Morse, dis., 37% to 40 per cent. 
Standard dis. 50 and 5 to 55 per cent 

Faucets . 
Common, cork-lined, dis. 35 per cent. 
ELBOWS. (Stovepipe.) 

No. 1, per doz 1 40 

No. 2, perdoz 1 20 

Bright, 20c. per doz. extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 
Discount, 45 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 
Iron, discount 40 per cent. 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 
Discount oft revised list, 40 per cent. 
FILES AND RASPS. 

Great Western 75 and 5 per cent. 

Disston 70 " 10 ■* 

Arcade 75 " 5 " 

Kearney & Foot 70 " 10 " 

American 75 " 5 " 

McClellan 70 " 5 " 

Eagle 70 10 and 5 " 

Nicholson 70 " 10 " 

Heller 60 " 10 " 

Royal & Keystone 80 p.c. and 80 and 10 p.c. 
Black Diamond, 60 to 6u and 10 per cent. 
Jowitt's, English list, 25 to 27% per cent. 

FORKS. 
Hay, manure, etc., dis., 50 and 10 per cent, 
revised list. 



GLASS— Window— Box Price. 

Star D. Diamond 

Size United Per Per Per Per 

Inches. 50 ft. 100 ft 50 ft. 100 ft. 

Under26 2 15 4 15 .... 6 00 

26to40 2 30 4 45 .... 6 60 

41to50 4 85 .... 7 50 

51 to60 5 15 .... 8 50 

61to70 5,50 .... 9 50 

71to80 6 00 .... 10 50 

81to85 6 50 .... 11 75 

86to90 14 00 

91 to 95 15 50 

99tol00 18 00 

GAUGES 
Marking, Kjrtise, Etc 
Stanley's dis. 50 to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 

Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33, eaoh... 165 2 40 

HALTERS. 
Rope, %> per gross 



9 00 
14 00 

4 00 

5 20 
2 45 



dis. 



1 20 



25 



2 00 
1 50 



1 25 
3 75 



8 40 
10 80 



" %%0% """-"" 

Leather, 1 in., perdoz 3 87% 

" l%in., " 5 15 

Web, —perdoz 187 

HAMMERS. 
Nail 
Maydole's, dis. 5 to 10 per cent. Can. 
25 to 27% per cent. 

Tack. 

Magnetic, per doz 110 

Sledge. 

Canadian, per lb 07% 08)* 

Ball Pean. 
English and Can., per lb.... 22 
HANDLES. 

Axe, per doz. net 150 

Store door, per doz 100 

Fork. 
C. & B., dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 

Hoe. 
C. & B., dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 
Saw. 

American, perdoz 100 

Plane. 

American, per gross 3 15 

Hammer and Hatchet. 
Canadian, 40 percent. 

Cross-Cut Saws. 

Canadian, per pair 13% 

HANGERS. doz. pairs. 

Steel barn door 5 85 6 00 

Stearns , 4 inch 5 00 

" 5 inch 6 50 

Lane's covered — 

No. 11,5-ft.run 

No. 11%, 10-ft.run 

No. 12, 10-ft.run 12 60 

No. 14, 15-ft. run 2100 

Lane's O.N. T. track, per foot. .... 4% 

HARVEST TOOLS. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 
HATCHETS. 
Canadian, dis. 40 to 42% per cent. 

HINGES. 
Blind, Parker's, dis. 50 and 10 to 60 per cent. 

Heavy T and strap, 4-in. , per lb 06% 

" " 5-in., " 06% 

" " 6-in., " .... 06 

" " 8-in., " .... 05% 

" 10-in., " .... 05% 
Light T and strap, dis. 65 and 5 per cent. 
Screw hook and hinge— 

6 to 10 in., per 100 lbs 3 90 

12 in. up, per 100 lbs 3 00 

Per gro. pairs. 

Spring 12 00 

HOES. 
Garden, Mortar, etc. , dis. 50 and 10 p.c. 

Planter, per doz 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE 

Discount, 45 and 5 per cent 

HOOKS. 
Cast Iron. 

Bird Cage, per doz 50 11" 

Clothes Line, per doz 27 0" 

Harness, per doz 72 ■? 

Hat and Coat, per gross 1 00 32; ? 

Chandelier, per doz 050 1 -*i 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought Hooks and Staples, Can., dis, 
47% per cent. 

Wire. 
Hat and Coat, discount 45 per eent. 

Belt, per 1,000 60 

Screw, bright, dis. 55 per oent. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



31 



u 



Syracu 



dbbi-t-t Metal 



IT IS THE 
BEST MADE. 




For 
Paper and Pulp 
Mills, Saw and 
Wood Working 
Machinery, Cotton 
and Silk Mills, 
Dynamos, Marine 
Engines, and all 
kinds of 
Machinery 
Bearings. 



". 



Wire, Triangular and Bar Solder, Pig Tin, Lead, Ingot Copper, Ingot Brass, Antimony, Aluminum, Bismuth, Zinc Spelter, 
Phosphor Tin, Phosphor Bronze, Nickle, etc., always in stock. 



Factories 



332 William St., MONTREAL, QUE. 
and SYRACUSE, N.Y. 



Syracuse Smelting Works 



HORSE NAILS. 
"Cbrand 50 and 7%P.c.off new Yut\ Oval- 
"M" brand 50, 10 and 5 per cent. S head 
Countersunk. 60 percent 

SORSESHOES 

F.O.B. Montreal. 
No. 2 No. 1. 
Iron Shoes. and and 

larger, smaller. 
Light, medium, and heavy. . . 3 50 3 75 

Snow shoes 3 75 4 00 

Steel Shoes. 

Light 3 60 3 85 

Featherweight (all sizes) 4 85 4 85 

F.O.B. Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Guelph, 10c. per keg additional. 

Toe weight steel shoes 6 70 

JAPANNED WARE. 
Discount, 45 and 5 p c. off list, June 1899 
ICE PICKS. 

Star per doz 3 00 3 25 

KETTLES. 
Brass spun, 7% p.o. dis. off new list. 

Copper, per lb 30 50 

American, 60 and 10 to 65 and 5 p.o. 

KEYS. 
Lock, Can., dis., 45 p.c. 
Cabinet, trunk, and padlock, 

Am. per gross 60 

KNOBS. 
Door, japanned and N.P., per 

doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin, per doz 2 75 3 25 

Bronze Genuine, per doz 6 00 9 00 

Shutter, porcelain, F. ft L. 

screw, per gross 130 4 00 

White door knobs— per doz. 1 25 

HAY KNIVES. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 

LAMP WICKS. 
Discount, 60 per oent. 

LANTERNS. 

Cold Blast, per doz 7 00 

No. 3 "Wrights" 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner 4 00 

Dashboard, cold blast . t 9 00 

No. 5 75 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

Porcelain lined per doz. 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized 187 3 85 

King, wood 2 75 2 90 

King, glass 4 00 4 50 

All glass 1 20 1 30 

LINES 

Fish, per gross 105 2 50 

Chalk " 1 90 7 40 

LOCKS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 
Russel ft Erwin, per doz.... 3 00 3 25 

Cabinet. 
Eagle, dis. 30 p.c. 

Padlock 
English and Am., perdoz..., 50 6 00 
Scandinavian, " .... 100 2 40 

Eagle, dis. 20 to 25 p.c 

MACHINE SCREWS. Iron and Brass. 
Flat head discount 25 p.c 
Round Head discount 20 p.o. 
MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths' perdoz 1 25 1 50 

Carpenters', hickory, per doz 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Yitae, per doz 3 85 5 00 

Caulking each 60 2 00 

MATTOCKS. 

Canadian, perdoz 5 50 6 50 

MEAT CUTTERS. 
American, dis. 25 to 30 p.c. 
German, 15 per cent. 

MILK CAN TRIMMINGS. 
Discount, 25 per oent. 

NAILS. 
Quotations are ; Out. Wire. 

2d and 3d $3 45 $3 85 

"" -_,. 3 10 S 52 

Jod 2 85 3 35 

■ <J7d 2 75 3 20 

8an39d 2 60 3 00 

10 and 1 2d 2 55 2 95 

16and20d 2 50 2 90 

30, 40, 50 and 60d. (base) 2 45 2 85 

Wire nails in carlots are $2.77% 

Galvanizing 2c. per lb. net extra. 

Steel Out Nails lOo. extra. 

Miscellaneous wire nails, dis. 70 and 10 p. c. 



Coopers' nails, dis. 30 per cent. 
Flour barrel nails, dis 25 percent 
NAIL PULLERS. 

German and American 185 3 50 

NAIL SETS 
Square, round, and octagon 

per gross 3 38 4 00 

Diamond 12 00 15 00 

NETTING. 
Poultry, 55 per cent for McMullen's 

OAKUM. Per 100 lb. 

Navy 6 00 

U.S.Navy 7 25 

OIL. 

Water White (U.S.) 16% 

Prime White (U.S.) 15% 

Water White (Can.) 15 

Prime White(Can.) 14 

OILERS. 
McOlary's Model galvan. oil 
can , with pump, 5 gal., 

per doz 10 00 

Zinc and tin, dis. 50, 50 and 10. 

Copper, per doz 125 3 50 

Brass, " 1 50 3 50 

Malleable, dis. 25 per cent. 

GALVANIZED PAILS. 
Dufferin pattern pails, dis. 45 p.c. 
Flaring pattern, discount 45 per cent. 
Galvanized wash tubs, discount 45 per cent. 

PIECED WARE. 
Discount 40 per cent, off list, June, 1899. 
10-qt. daring sap buckets, dip. 45 p.c. 
6, lu and 14-qt. Hiring pai s, dis. 45 p.c. 
Creamer cans, dis. 45 p.c. 
PICKS. 

Perdoz 6 00 9 00 

PICTURE NAILS. 
Poroelain head, per gross.... 175 3 00 
Brass head " .... 40 1 00 

PICTURE WIRE. 
Tin and gilt, discount 75 p c. 
PLANES. 
Wood, bench, Canadian dis. 50 per cent. 

American dis. 50. 
Wood, fancy Canadian or American 7% 
to 40 per oent. 

PLANE IRONS. 

English, perdoz 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 
Button's Genuine per doz pairs, dis. 37% 

40 p.c. 
Button's Imitation, per doz.. 5 00 9 00 

German, per doz 60 2 60 

PLUMBERS BRASS GOODS. 
Compression work, discount, 60 per cent. 
Fuller's work, discount 65 per cent. 
Rough stops and stop and waste cocks, dis- 
count, 60 per cent. 
Jenkins disk globe and angle valves, dis- 
count, 55 percent. 
Standard valves, discount, 60 per percent. 
Jenkins 'radiator valves, discount 55 per cent. 
" " " standard, dis., 60 p.c. 

Quick opening valves discount, 60 p.c. 

No. 1 compression bath cock 2 00 

No.4 " " " 2 00 

No. 7, Fuller's 2 50 

No 4%, " 300 

POWDER. 
Velox Smokeless Shotgun Powder. 

1001b. or less 85 

1,000 lb. or more 80 

Net 30 days. 
PRESSED SPIKES. 
Discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse, per doz 55 100 

Axle 22 33 

Screw 27 100 

Awning 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 1 80 3 60 

Canadian pitcher spout 140 2 10 

PUNCHES. 

Saddlers', perdoz 100 185 

Conductors', " 9 00 15 00 

Tinners' solid, per set 00 72 

" hollow, per inch.... 00 100 



RANGE BOILERS. 

Galvanized, 3 gallons 7 00 

" 35 " 8 25 

40 " 9 50 

Copper, 30 " 22 00 

n 35 " 26 00 

" 40 " 30 00 

Discount off Copper Boilers 10 per cent. 

RAKES. 
Cast steel and malleable, 50, 10 and 5 p.c. 
Wood, 25 per cent. 

RAZORS. 

per doz. 

Elliot's 4 00 18 00 

Geo. Butler ft Co.'s, 4 00 18 00 

Boker's 7 50 11 00 

KingCutter 12 50 50 00 

Wade & Butcher's 3 60 10 00 

Theile ft Quack's 7 00 12 00 

REAPING HOOKS. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 
REGISTERS. 

Discount 40 per cent. 

RIVETS AND BURRS. 
Iron Rivets, black and tinned, discount 60 

and 10 per cent. 
Iron Burrs, liscount 55 per cent. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in 1-1 b. cartons, %c. 

per lb. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in %-lb. cartons, lc. 

per lb. 
Copper Rivets ft Burrs, 35 and 5 p.c. dis. 

and cartons, lc. per lb. extra, net. 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets 
%-lb. cartons, lc. per lb. 
RIVET SETS 
Canadian, dis. 35 to 37% per cent. 
ROPE ETC. 

Sisal. Manila. 
7-16 in. and larger, per lb 10 13% 

%in 11 14% 

% and5-16in 15% 

Cotton, 3-16 inch and larger 16 

" 5-32 inch 21 

" %inch 22% 

Russia Deep Sea 15% 

Jute 8 

Lath Yarn 9% 

New Zealand Rope 10 

RULES. 
Boxwood, dis. 75 and 10 p.o. 
Ivory, dis. 37% to 40 p,c. 

SAD IRONS. per set. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished 62% 

" No. 50, nickle-plated 67% 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 

Dominion Flint Paper, 47% pe cent. 

B ft A. sand, 40 and 5 per cent. 

Emery, 40 per cent. 

Garret (Rurton's), 5 to 10 p.c. advance on list. 

SAP SPOUTS. 
Bronzed iron with hooks, per doz. . . 9 50 

SAWS. 
Sand Disston's, dis. 12% p.o. 
S. ft D., 40 per cent. 

Crosscut, Disston's, per ft.... 35 55 
S. ft D., dis. 35 p.c. on Nos. 2 and 3. 

Hack, complete, eaoh 75 2 75 

■ frame only 75 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional, per 100 lbs 2 75 3 00 

Solid, " 2 00 2 25 

SASH CORD. 

er lb 23 30 

SAW 8ETS. 
"Lincoln" anl Wh t'ng, per doz... 6 CO 
Hand Sets No.J Woodyatt (Morrill) 4 25 
X-cut sets, No. 3 Woodyatt (Mi rrill) 9 50 

SCALiEb. 
Standard, 4'i p.c. 
Champion, 65 p.c. 
Spring Balances, 10 p.c. 
Fairbanks Standard, 35 p.c. 
" Dominion, 55 p.c. 

" Richelieu, 55 p.c. 

SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's per doz 65 100 

SCREWS 
Wood, F. H., brightand steel, 87% and lOp.c. 
Wood R. H., " dis. 82% and 10 p.o. 
" F. H., brass, dis. 80 and 10 p.o. 



Wood, R. H., " dis. 75 and 10 p.o. 

" F.H., bronze, dis. 75 p.c. 

" R.H. " 70 p.c. 
Drive Screws, 87% and 10 percent. 
Bench, wood, perdoz 3 25 4 00 

" iron. " 4 25 5 75 

Set, Case hardened, 60 per cent. 
Square Cap, 50 and 5 per cent. 
Hexagon Cap, 45 per cent. 

SCYTHES. 
Per doz, net 9 00 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 

SHEARS. 
Bailey Cutlery Co., full nickeled, dis. 60 p.c 
Seymour's, dis. 50 and 10 p.c. 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 
Canadian, dis. 40 and 5 per cent. 

SINKS. 
Steel and galvanized, discount 45 percent. 

SNAPS. 
Harness, German, dis. 25 p.c. 

Lock, Andrews' 4 50 1150 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

1, 1% lb., per lb 37 

2 lb. or over, per lb 34 

SQUARES. 

Iron, No. 493, perdoz 2 40 2 55 

" Mo. 494, " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, dis. 60. 10 and 5 p.c. 
Try and bevel, dis. 50 to 52% p.c. 
STAMPED WARE. 
Plain, dis. , 75 and 12% p.c. off revised list 
Retinned, dis., 75 p.c. off revised list. 
STAPLES. 

Galvanized 3 50 4 00 

Plain 3 25 375 

Coopers', discount 45 percent. 
Poultry netting staples, 40 per cent. 
STOCKS AND DIES. 
American dis. 25 p.o. 

STONE. Per lb. 

Washita 28 60 

Hindostan 06 07 

, " _ 8l>P 09 09 

Labrador 13 

„, " Axe 15 

Turkey 50 

Arkansas 00 150 

Water-of-Ayr 00 10 

Scythe, per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind.2in,40 to 200 lb.per ton 25 00 

" under 40 lb. " .... 28 00 

Grind, under 2 in. thick " 29 00 

STOVE PIPES. 
5 and 6 inch Per 100 lengths . . 7 00 

1 ' n ch " " .... 7 5 

ENAMELINF STOVE POLISH. 

No. 4—3 dozen in case, net oasb 94 80 

No. 6— 3 dozen in case, " .... 8 40 
TACKS BRADS, ETC. 

Cheese-box tacks, blued 80 4 12% 

Trunk tacks, black and tinned 85 

Carpet tacks, blued 80 ft 15 

tinned 80 ft 20 

" " (in kegs) 40 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only . . 80 

" % weights 60 

Swedes cut tacks, blued and tinned— 

In bulk 80 ft 10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk. ... 85, 12% ft 12% 
" brush, blued ft tinned, bulk.,70 
" gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 ft 12% 

Zino tacks 35 

Leather carpet tacks 55 

Copper tacks 50 

Copper nails 55% 

Trunk nails, black 65 and 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout nails, blued 65 and 5 

Chair nails 35 

Patent brads .'.'.'.'' 40 

Fine finishing .'..!..' 40 

Lining tacks, in papers '.'.'...'. 10 



32 



CANADfAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



PITTSBURGH, 

U. S. A. 



STANDARD CHAIN CO., 

CHAIN 

Proof Coil, B.B., B.B.B., Crane, Dredge Chain, Trace Chains, Cow Ties etc. 



MANUFACTURERS 
OF" 



OF ALL KINDS. 



AlEX ffiJ£, 8IBB ' "C-adian K.pr.. M tati™- fc °; «»«= * °» 



Montreal 

For Provinces of Ontario and Quebec. 



For other Provinces. 



Lining tacks, in bulk 15 

" " solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails in papers 10 

" in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in dozens only 60 

Tin oapped trunk nails 15 

Zinc glazier's points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers 90 and 10 

" " bulk 40 

TAPE LINES. 
English, ass skin, per doz... . 2 75 5 00 
English, Patent Leather.... 5 50 9 75 

Ohesterman's each 90 2 85 

" steel, each .... 80 8 00 

THERMOMETERS. 
Tin case and dairy, dia. 75 to 75 and 10 p.c. 

TRAPS. (Steel.) 
Game, Xewhouse, dis. 25 p.c. 
Game, H. 4N„ P. S. & W., 65 p.o. 
Game, steel, 72 1 /,, 75 p.o. 

TROWELS. 

Disston's discount 10 per cent. 

German, per doz 4 75 6 00 

8. & D., discount 35 per cent. 
TWINES. 

Bag, Russian, per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply 18% 

" " 4-ply 23 f / 2 

Mattress, per lb 33 45 

Staging, " 27 35 



VISES. 

Wright's 13V, 

Brooks 12% 

Pioe Vise, Hinge, No. 1 3 50 

No 2 5 50 

Saw Vise 4 5 J 9 00 

ENAMELLED WARE. 
White, Princess, Turquoise, Blue and White, 

discount 50 per cent. 
Diamond, Famous, Premier, 50 and 10 p.c. 
Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent, 50, 10 

and 10 per cent. 

WIRE. 

Brass wire, 50 to 50 and 2% per cent, off the 

list. 
Copper wire, 45 and 10 per cent, net cash 30 
days, f.o.b. factory. 
Smooth Steel Wire, is quoted at the 
following net selling prices: 
No. 6 to 8 gauge $2 90 



2 80 
2 87 
2 90 

2 95 

3 15 
3 37 
3 50 
3 65 



Other Bizej of plain wire outside of Nos. 9, 
10, 11, 12 and 13, and other varieties of 
plain wire remain at $2.8) base with 



extras as before. The prices for Nos 9. 
to 13 include the charge of 1 c 
for oiling. Extras net per 100 lb.: 
Coppered wire, 60c— tinned wire, $2— 
oiling, 10c— special hay-bailing wire, 30c. 
—spring wire, $1— best steel wire, 75c— 
bright soft drawn, 15c— in 50 and 100-lb. 
bundles net, 10c— in 25-lb. bundles net 
15c— packed in casks or cases, 15c— 
bagging or papering, 10c 

Fine Steel Wire, dis. lV/ 2 per cent. 
List of extras : In 100-lh. lots : No. 
17, $5— No. 18, 85.50— No. 19, $6-No. 20, 
«6.65-No. 21, 87-No. 22, $7.30-No. 23, 
7.65 -No. 24, $8— No. 25, $9— No. 26, 
89.50-No. 27, $10-No. 28. $11 No. 29. 
$12-No. 30, $13-No. 31,$14-No. 32. $1£ 
No. 33, $16— No. 34, $17. Extras net- 
tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, $2— Nos. 26-31 
$4— Nos. 32-34, $6. Coppered, 5c— oil 
ing, 10c— in 25-lb. bundles, 15c— in 5 and 
10-lb. bundles. 25c— in 1-lb. hanks, 50c— 
in Va-lb. hanks, 75c— in >4-lb. hanks, $1— 
packed in casks orcases, 15c— bagging or 
papering, 10c 

Galvanized Wire, perlOOlb.— Nos. 6,7 8, $3 50 
to $3 8 T — No. 9, $2.85 to $3.15— No. 10 
$3.60 to $3.95— No. 11, $3.70 to $4.10- No 
12, $3 to $3 30-No. 13, $3.in to $3 40- 
No. 14. $4.1" to $».50-No. 15. $4.60 to 
$5.05— No. 16. $4.85 to $5 35. Bafe sizes, 
Nos. 6 to 9, $2. 57% f.o h. Cleveland. 

Clothes Line Wire, solid 7 strand, No 17 



$4.25; No. 18, 12.65; No. 19, $7.35, f o.b. 
Hamilton, Toronto, Montreal. 
WIRE FENCING. 

Galvanized barb 3 f5 

Galvanized, plain twist 3 05 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $2 82% 
in less than carlots, and $2.73 in carlots. 

WIRE CLOTH. 
Painted Screen, per 100 sq. ft., net.. 1 35 
WASTE COTTON. per lb. 

Colored 4% to 5 

White, according to quality 6% to 1% 

50C-lb bale lots shaded. 

WRENCHES. 
Acme, 35 to 37% per cent. 
Agricultural, 60 p.c. 
Coe's Genuine, dis. 20 to 25 p.c 

Towers' Engineer, each J 00 7 00 

" 8., per doz 5 80 6 00 

G. * K 's Pipe, per doz 3 40 

Burrell's Pipe, each 3 00 

Pocket. per doz 25 2 90 

WRINGERS. 

Leader per doz. $30 31 00 

Royal Canadian.. " 26 00 ;S 00 

Royal American., " 26 00 28 00 

Sampson " 30 00 

Terms 4 months, or 3 p.c. 30 days. 
WROUGHT IRON WASHERS. 
Canadian make, discount, 40 per cent. 



o^^Wttfe* 






TORONTO EXHIBITION 

AUGUST 26th TOJEPTEMBER 7th, 1901 

165,000 



PREMIUMS 

and 

ATTRACTIONS 



Naval and Military Displays Daily 

BRILLIANT SPECTACLES 

Bombardment of Taku Forts by 

International Forces 



Greatest Live Stock Show on the Continent 
All Our Country's Resources 

Novel and High-Class Entertainment 
Features 

MILITARY TATTOO, AUGUST 27th 



Great Reunion of Canadian Old Boys and 
Old College Students 

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3rd 



AN 



Reduced Rates All Lines of Travel 

DR 



S.EW SMITH, F.R.C.V.S. 
President 



H. J. HILL 

Manager 



TORONTO 



DIAMOND EXTENSION FRONT GRATE. 

Ends Slide in Dovetails similar to 
Diamond Stove Back. 

Diamond 

Adjustable Cook 

Stove Damper 




For Sale by Jobbers of Hardware 



Manufactured by THE ADAMS COMPANY, Dubuque, Iowa, U.S.A. 
" A. R. WOODY ATT & CO., Guelph, Ontario. 




"THE EMLYN" SAW BENCH 

Made in 6 sizes. Best value obtainable. Specially 
designed for export. With or without " Etnlyn " 
Patent Guard. Sole maker — 

CHARLES D. PHILLIPS, 

Cables — Emlyn Engineering Works, 

" Machinery," Newport. Newport, Mon., England. 



IF THE WORDS 

"Dundas Axe" 



ate. stamped on an Axe, you can 
rely on its being the best that 
can be made. 



DUNDAS AXE WORKS 

Dundas, Ont. 

Buy the Best. 




HERCULES 

Sash Cord. 

Star Brand Gotton Rope 

Star Brand Gotton Glotbes Lines 

Star Brand Gotton Twine 

For Sale by all Wholesale Dealers 



: 



BUSINESS 
NEWS 

of any kind that is of value to business men 
supplied by our Bureau. We can give you 
market quotations from any town in Can- 
ada, reports from the city markets, stock 
quotations, etc. You can get commercial 
news from any Canadian paper through us. 

Write us, giving us particulars of what 
you want and where you want it from, and 
we will quote you prices by return. 

"Clippings from any Canadian paper on 
any subject," 



:iUDItl PRESS CLIPPING BUREAU, 

232 McOlll Street, MONTREAL, QUE. 
Telephone Main 125S. 
10 Front St. East, Toronto. Telephone 2148. 



75 YEARS. 



CELEBRATED 



ESTABLISHED 1825. 



75 YEARS. 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS. 



Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers, Scissors, 
Tinners' Snips, ete. 




ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST. 



R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. SA^ RK N.?. FF ^sV oCha,nber,8t 

Not connected with any Shear Combination. 

CHAS. F. CLARK, President. JARED CHITTENDEN, Treasurer. 

...ESTABLISHED 1849... 



Capital and Surplus, $1,500,000. Offices Throughout the Civilized World. 

Executive Offices : Nob. 346 and 348 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers information that reflects the financial condition and 
the controlling circumstances of every seeker of mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the 
merchants, by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information no 
effort is spared, and no reasonable expense considered too great, that the results mayjustify its claim as an 
authority on all matters affecting commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have 
been steadily extended, and it furnishes information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized 
world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, jobbing 
and manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporations. 
Specific terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of its offices. Correspondence Invited. 



-OFFICES IN CANADA- 



HALIFAX, N.S. 
OTTAWA. ONT. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



Hi MILTON, ONT. 
QUEBEC, QUE. 
VICTORIA, B.C. 



LONDON, ONT. 
ST. JOHN, N.B. 
WINNIPEG, MAN. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



THOS, C, IRVING, Gen, Man, Western Canada, Toronto, JOHN A, FULTON, Gen, Man. Eastern Canada, Montreal, 



PERSONS addressing advertisers 
will kindly mention having 
seen their advertisement in 
Canadian Hardware and Metal 
Merchant. 



ADVERTISING in WESTERN CANADA 

will be Carefully, Efficiently, and Promptly 
attended to, by 

The Roberts Advertising Agency, 

WINNIPEG CANADA. 



ASPINALL'S 

0. White for Inside, 

Indian White — Outside 

for 

Decorators' Use. 

Imperial Gallons 

and ^-Gallons. 




Free from Poisonous White Lead. Colours 
Perfect. The original English make as supplied 
to Royalty. 

Agents: Ontario and the East, R, C, Jamieson &. Co., 13 St. John 
Street. Montreal. Winnipeg and District, J, H, Ashdown. 
Winnipeg. 




Ine.lM5 



Black Diamond File Works 

6. & H. Barnett Company 



ii 
!! 

l> 

!i 



PHILADELPHIA 



Twelve 



Medals 




Awarded 
By JURORS at 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 




4>^%%>%%%%>%%^%^%%>%%^%%^%%»^%^%^ 



1901 





E, 



1901 



We manufacture the most popular and best 
selling lines of Garden Hose in Canada. Our "Mal- 
tese Cross" brand we confidently recommend as 
the finest Garden Hose on the market. 

We have other grades not quite so expensive, 
but good reliable brands, viz. : "Lion" (the popular 
medium-priced hose), "King" "Sun" and "Leader." 

Our "Kinkproof " (wire wound) hose is wired 
by a special process controlled solely by ourselves, 
and is so constructed that it may be cut at any 
wind of the wire without loosening or uncoiling, 
the wire being self-gripping throughout each 
length. 

The Gutta Pergha and Rubber Mfg. Co. 

OF TORONTO, LIMITED. 

Head Office and Warerooms— 
49-61-63 West Front St., 

TORONTO, C anada. 

Factories— I 16-165 West Lodge Ave. 
124-148 O'Hara Ave. 



American Sheet Steel Co., 



NEW YORK. 



Galvanized Steel Sheets, • 

Black Steel Sheets, 

Dewees Wood Co.'s Polished Sheets. 



American Tin Plate Co., 

NEW YORK. 

Coke, Charcoal, and Terne Plates. 



PRICES ON APPLICATION TO 

B.&S.H. THOMPSON &C0'Y 

28 St. Sulpice St., MONTREAL, 



Selling Agents for Canada. 



CORDAGE 



ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



Manila Rope 
Sisal Rope 
Jute Rope 
Russian Rope 
Marline 
Houseline 
Hambroline 
Clotheslines 
Tarred Hemp Rope 
White Hemp Rope 
Bolt Rope 
Hide Rope 
Halyards 
Deep Seallne 
Ratline 
Plow Lines 



Lathyarn 
Shingleyarn 
Bale Rope 
Lariat Rope 
Hemp Packing 
Italian Packing 
Jute Packing 
Drilling Cables 
Spunyarn 
Pulp Cord 
Lobster Marlin 
Paper Cord 
Cheese Cord 
Hay Rope 
Fish Cord 
Sand Lines 



"RED THREAD" Transmission Rope from the finest quality Manila 
hemp obtainable, laid in tallow. 



CONSUMERS CORDAGE COMPANY, 



Western Ontario Representative 
WM. B. STEWART, 



'Limited 7 -> 



Tel 94. 



27 Front St. West, TORONTO. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 



Copper, Tin, Antimony, Etc 

LANGWELIS BABBITT 
Montreal. 




The Weekly Organ of the Hardware. Metal, Heating, Plumbing and Contracting Trades in Canada. 



VOL. Xlll. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, AUGUST 3, 1901. 



NO. 31 



•TANDEM" ANTI-FRICTION METAL. 



The Most Economical. 
The Least Wearing. 
The Most Durable. 

Friction Preventing. 



'Tandem" Metals are better than 
any other for their purpose, 
and are, therefore : 

Resistance Reducing. 
Journal Preserving. 
Power Increasing. 
Lubricant Saving. 



A QUALITY 

For Heaviest Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Heavy Pressure and High Speed. 

B QUALITY 

For Heavy Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Medium Pressure and High Speed. 

C QUALITY 

For Medium Pressure and High Speed 
or Low Pressure and Highest Speed. 

Sole Agents : 

LAMPLOUGH & McNAUGHTON, 59 St. Sulpice Street, MONTREAL. 
THE TANDEM SMELTING SYNDICATE, LIMITED 

The largest smelters of Anti-Friction Queen Victoria St., London, E.C. 

Metals in Europe. 




A Simple Proposition. 



If the object of ga'vanizing Sheet Iron is to 
protect from rust, it pays to get the fullest 
protection. In other words, it pays to use 
"Queen's Head" brand, which is un- 
equalled by any on the market. 



JOHN LYSAGHT, Limited, Makers, A. C. LESLIE & CO., MONTREAL, 
BRISTOL, ENG. Managers Canadian Branch, 



' 



GOOD POINTS. 

The Safford Radiator 

has a score of them, but there is one which success has accented — 
it's simplicity. Like all other great inventions, the "SAFFORD" 
is ingeniously simple. It is connected at the joints by patent 
screw nipples. That's what made the "SAFFORD" suc- 
cessful — no bolts, no packing — just a plain screwed 
connection. This means that the "SAFFORD" is posi- 
tively non-leakable — positively durable. Of all Radiators 
the "SAFFORD" alone possesses this simple device. 

The "SAFFORD" is made in many designs and 
heights, and is always graceful in its lines and bulk. It 
is made to fit in corners, to circle pillars, and for bay 
windows. 

We will be pleased to give you any information you desire. Remember, we are the 
Largest Radiator Manufacturers under the British Flag. 

THE DOMINION RADIATOR COMPANY, Limited, TORONTO. 




Lawn 
Mowers 



%I#v#VWv#vW# vWW^ i7j %i iff> ***?* %t •% *~ *% • Ww v» ^» ♦ %» % ♦ y!r 



... AND ... 



Garden 
Hose 




O Special Mowers 

F0R 

Golf Grounds and 

Tennis Courts. 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



LIMITED 



WRITE FOR PRICES . "ORON fO 



METALS. 



^•^; 
•^•^? 



Antimony, Copper, Lead, Tin, Zinc 



SAMUEL, SONS & BENJAMIN, - - LONDON AND LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND 

M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin & Co. 



General Importers and Exporters and Metal Merchants 



27 Wellington Street West, - - TORONTO, ONT. 



k, 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE TIME TO INSURE IS 



NOW 



While you are WELL, STRONG and INSURABLE. 



THE 



^ 



Confederation 
Life 

ASSOCIATION issues policies on all approved plans 
of insurance, and is a prosperous and progressive 
Canadian Company. 

PROTECTION FOR YOUR FAMILY. 
PROFITABLE INVESTMENT FOR YOURSELF. 

Pamphlets and full information sent on application. 



Hon, Sir W. P. Rowland, K.C.M.G., C.B., 

PRESIDENT. 

W. H. Beatty, Esq., W. D. Matthews, Esq,, 

VICE-PRESIDENTS. 



W. C. MACDONALD 
ACTUARY. 

HEAD OFFICE, 



J. K. MACDONALD, 

MANAGING DIRECTOR. 

TORONTO. 



HOS 




WATER 

STEAM 

AIR 

FIRE 

BABCOCK 



SUCTION 

ACID 

OIL 

SODA WATER 

HIGH-PRESSURE 



Our Patent Seamless Tube is, without doubt, 

the only perfect construction. 

The Canadian Rubber Co., 



capital 



$1,500,000 00. 



/Montreal. 



Toronto. 



Winnipeg. 



Lightning, Gem 
Blizzard . . . 



FREEZERS 





'^wSi s ' 




ARE 

Well Advertised 
In Demand 
Easily Sold 
| ^Satisfactory in Use 
Of Known Reputation 



HAVE 

Cedar Pails with Electric Welded Wire Hoops 
Cans of Heavy Tin with Drawn Steel Bottoms 
AUTOMATIC Twin Scrapers 
"The Ice Cream Freezer Book" tells all about 
these and our other Freezers, mailed free 



EXCEL IN 



Easy Running 
Quick Freezing 
Economy 
Convenience 
Practical Results 



North Bros. Mfg. Co., 



Philadelphia, Pa., 

U.S.A. 



•1 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



FOR WARM AIR HEATING. 

Our many lines x of coal and wood furnaces offer a range of sizes and styles 
that afford complete satisfaction — everywhere. 



a 



OUR LATEST CONSTRUCTION" 



The Dxforc 





Oxford 400 Series, Portable. 



are unequalled in excellence — combining enormous power with gratifying economy. 
Their improved points of construction will interest every practical dealer or buyer. 

They are made with Steel Plate Radiators, and supplied either portable, as shown, 
or stationary for brick setting. 

Our Little Ox and Oxford Furnaces fOP WOOd are already in favorable use all over the country, their incomparable 
popularity having been gained by superior merit. 

Consult our catalogue for full information about these splendid lines — to handle them will insure the most satisfying 
trade possible. 



THE OURNEY FOUNDRY CO, Limited 

TORONTO. WINNIPEG. VANCOUVER. 

THE GURNEY-MASSEY CO., LIMITED, MONTREAL. 



DOMINION WIRE MANUFACTURING CO. 



Limited. 



MONTREAL 




TORONTO 



Manufacturers of 



Wire Nails 

Wood Screws 

Bright Wire Goods 

Baling Wire 

Broom and Mattress Wire 

Galvanized Wire 
Staples 

Crescent Coat and Hat Hooks 

Jack Chain Wire Door Pulls 

Cotter Pins Barb Wire 

WRITE FOR PRICES AND DISCOUNTS. 



I THE NEW BALDWJN t 

DRY AIR CLEANABLE 

I REFRIGERATOR. 

! 135 Modern Varieties. Ash, Oak and Soft-wood Finishes 

j METAL, PORCELAIN, SPRUCE LININGS. 

I BALDWIN 

I Positive Circulation— 

l Sanitary— Odorless. 

Latest Cleanable Fea- 

' tares — The Strongest 

} and Best System of 

> Patent Removable 
} Metal Air-Flues. 

> Air-Tight Lever Locks 
j Bail-Bearing Casters. 

Swing Base — in and 

out. 
Rubber around Boors 
and Lids, making 
them doubly air-tight. 
Handsome Designs. 
Moderate Prices. 




Built in the newest, largest and best equipped refrigerator plant in the EajJ 
run all the year round on refrigerators exclusively ; stock goods ; special 
refrigerators and coolers in sections. 

Handsome Trade Catalogue Ready. 

Baldwin Refrigerator Co., 

BURLINGTON, VERMONT. 



1 

t 

i 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Lewis Bros. & Co. 



Wholesale 
Hardware, 




* HONTREAL. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR SPORTING GOODS OF ALL KINDS. 



rtl 




Tomlinson's Gun Cleaner. 



With Brass Wire Cloth for Removing Lead. Ready for Cleaning or Oiling Cloth. 
BLUE ROCK GUN CLEANER. 




Mill's Woven Cartridge Belt No. 200. Cartridge Bags. 

WRITE FOR 56 PAGE GUN AND AMMUNITION CATALOGUE. 



Hunting Cap. 



Mail Orders shipped same day as 
received and billed at lowest prices. 



LEWIS BROS. & CO., MONTREAL. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Henry Rogers, 
Sons & Co. 

Wolverhampton, England. 

Manufacturers of___JH^^ 

"Union Jack" Galvanized Sheets 

Canada and Tin Plates 

Black Sheets 

Sleigh Shoes and Tyre Steel 

Coil Chain, Hoop Iron 

Sheet and Pig Lead 

Sheet Zinc 



Quotations can be had from 

Canadian Office : 



6 St. Sacrament St., 



MONTREAL 



F. A. YORK, Manager. 




GET THE ORIGINAL. 

We lead, others imitate. 

E. T. WRIGHT dc CO, 

Manufacturers, HAMILTON, ONT. 

KNOX HENRY 

Heavy Hardware and Metal Broker 
Room 32, Canada Life Bldg., MONTREAL. 




Samples sent free on application. 
HORSE NAILS — " C " Brand Horse - Nails 

Canada Horse Nail Co. 
" BRASSITE " GOODS — Hunn Castor Co. 

Limited, Birmingham, Eng. 






Will Hold Dp a Shelf! 

That's what a shelf bracket is for. 
For this purpose there can be 

NOTHING BETTER 
NOTHING CHEAPER 

than the .... 

BRADLEY STEEL SHELF BRACKET 

It is well Japanned, Strong and Light. 

The raving in freight is a good profit, aside 
from the lower price at which the goods are sold. 
jtaj- Order director through your jobber. 

ATLAS MFG. CO., New Haven, Conn.. U.S.A 




PANADIAN ADVERTISING is best done by THE 
^ E. DESBARATS ADVERTISING AGENCY 
Montreal. 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John Street, Montreal 

Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishing to be represented in Canada. 



•T'T 



STEVENS 



ALL ST 

TOOLS 



-ARE- 



I 

STANDARD FOR QUALITY. ( 

4 

I 



Your stock is not complete without a full line of our Rifles, Shotguns, Pistols, Tools 

and Victor Bicycles. 

Handled by the Leading Jobbers. 

J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co., p °2, Bo " Chicopee Falls, Mass., U.S.A. 




This eight-foot Brake bends 22-gaage iron 
and lighter, straight and true. 

Price, $60 

Very handy header attachment, $15 extra 

if required. 

Send for circulars and testimonials to 

The Double Truss Cornice 
Brake Co. 5555™2!u°2i 



The Latest and Best. 

H. & R. Automatic Ejecting 
Single Gun. 



Model 
1900. 



Steel and Twist Barrels 
in 30 and 32-inch. 

12 Gauge. 




Harrington & Richardson Arms Co. 

Worcester, Mass., U.S.A. 

Descriptive Catalogue on request. 



We want progressive, hustling dealers to make 
...the . 



I "London" Fence Machine 



a specialty. It is just what the farmers are 
looking for. 

Woodstock, Ont., July 27th, 1901. 
The London Fence Machine Co. 

Gentlemen, — We beg to report that the " London " Fence Machine seems to 
be exactly what the farmers have been looking for, for some considerable time. It 
appears to do most excellent work and has given our customers universal satisfac- 
tion. We are very much of the opinion that the sales of your machine nv* 1 
necessarily grow to large proportions. Yours very truly, r* 

J. H. BUCHANAN & CO 

High-Grade High Carbon Coiled Spring Wire. " London " Pulley 
Stretchers, Reels, Steel Gates, Soft Galvanized Wire, Barb Wire and 
Plain Twist. Si*cial prices on cars of wire f.o.b. London or Cleveland. 




London Fence Machine Co., London, Can. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



The 



line 
...of 



PENINSULAR 

STOVES •>" RANGES 



is now the most complete on the Canadian market. It comprises a full line of Four 
and Six Hole Ranges for coal and wood ; Coal and Wood Cooks, Base Burners, and 
Heating Stoves. 




The accompanying cut is of our "Home Peninsular" Four-Hole Range and is an 
example of what we have to offer. It has a Steel Oven and all modern improvements. 
During the Spring of iqoi we sold more of these stoves than we made all last year, 
giving evidence of their increasing popularity. 

Send for our catalogue and discounts and special advertising booklets 
with which we supply the trade. 



Glare Bros. & Co., 



Preston, Ont., and 
Winnipeg, Man. 



I- 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ESTABLISHED I860. 



INCORPORATED 1895. 



% 


fc 


% fc 




x ! -^^^t 




i 




n 


^ 


^ ^ 



COAL HODS 



and . . . 

All Other Fall Lines. 



Stove Boards, 
pire Shovels, 

Elboms, ete. 

We will be pleased to quote. 



THE THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Limited, MONTREAL, QUE. 




Enterprise" Cherry %$ toners 

Nos. 17 ond 18 are constructed with & patented 
Regulating Device the simplicity of which makes it 
easier to adjust the machine for the different sizes of 

Cherries arid absolutely insurey the jaws retaining 

their position when yet. 

'Pie No. 12 is intended to remove the 
./•tones with the least possible cutting or 
disfiguring of the Fruit. 



All the Leading Jobbery 

Of the Dominion 

SELL THEM 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 
MAILED FREE 



The Enterprise Mfg. Co. qf Pa. fW 



Philadelphia. P&. U. S. A. 




No. 33. 
No. 34. 



Tinned ~®I $ 6.00 per doz. 
Nickeled 15-00 " *' 

sag 





® 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




Tailors' 

Irons 

POLISHED FACE and JAPANNED TOPS 



OR 



NICKEL-PLATE ALL OVER. 

Sizes: 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24 lbs. 

MADE FROM HIGH-GRADE IRON, AND 
PROPERLY GROUND AND FINISHED. 

Order the WOODYATT MAKE and you will get THE BEST. 



Manufactured by 



A. R. WOODYATT & CO., Guelph, Canada. 



Sold only through 
the wholesale trade 



Kemp's Seamless Steel Kitchen Sinks 



iff- iwi 



u 



;■;- 



STira 



.",■ 






1 






IE -" : 'm 



- 



;'U 



I 



are pressed out of sheets of cold wrought steel and are 
unbreakable. Owing to their comparative lightness, 
you will have less freight to pay than on the heavy 
cumbersome Cast Iron Sinks. 

Being made without seams or joints and being 
rounded at sides and corners, it is easy to keep them 
clean, and they are perfectly odorless. 



Each one is neatly and smoothly finished. 
They are provided with Strainers and connections with Brass Bolts that cannot rust out. 
Made in three styles of finish. 
Painted, Galvanized, Enameled. 



sizes 



t6 x 24 
18 x 30 
18 x 36 



V 



WE WILL BE PLEASED TO NAME YOU PRICES. 



Kemp Manufacturing Co'y, Toronto. 




VOL. XIII. MONTREAL AND TORONTO. AUGUST 3, 1901. NO. 31. 

President, to the creditors. The Dominion Radiator A LATE PARIS-GREEN SEASON. 

JOHN BAYNE MacLEAN. DniTT T .. , , , . 

Montreal. Co. and one or two other creditors refused K BOUT June i. the manufacturers j,of 

THE MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO. to accept the composition. y\ Paris green were beginning to 

Limited. Both Bull and Hersee were made defend- think that they would have to 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which cir- ants an( j before the court it was held that carry over a heavy surplus from last winter's 

culate in the Provinces of British Columbia, 

North- West Territories, Manitoba^ Ontario, the defendant Hersee, at the time of the manufactures to next year. 

Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick , f.c. . ' 

island and Newfoundland. execution of the bill of sale transferring the The month of May, which generally sees 

OFFICES , . j • . . 

MONTREAL 232 McGiii Street, assets to him, knew that all the creditors a big sorting trade in the potato bug poison, 

TORONTO 10 Fro^nt 1 Itr 1 e et e EMt; had not accepted the composition, and that had furnished almost none of its regular 

LONDON. ENQ. - - - - 100 Fleet street' e!&.! the plaintiffs by letter had withdrawn from quota of business. The weather had been 

W. H. Miln. . , ., , , . , 

Manchester, enq. - - - iS St Ann Street, the agreement authorizing the composition ; damp and cold, and the potato bug seemed 

H. S. Ashburner. b & r 

Winnipeg .... Western Canada^Biock, lhat t he agreement is not binding upon the to be no more. 

ST. john.n.b. - - . N0.3 Market Wharj," plaintiffSi but that the defcndant( Hersee, But the reaction came, and the fears of 

new YORK. 176 e. 88th street! in a u the bm of sale and entering in _ the manufacturers were speedily dispelled. 

Subscription, Canada and the United States, $2.00. T , , , .. , T , , .. . 

Great Britain and elsewhere - - - 12s. t0 t hetrusts and covenants therein con- 1 he hot weather of June produced the bug 

Published e*erf Saturday. knowledge that he had made in myriads, and orders for paris green came 

r.hle Arfdreii i Adscript, London. & 

Ud8crip t, Canada. himself liable to the plaintiffs for the full in faster than they could be filled, until the 

amount of their claim ; that the defendant fea r of surplus stocks gave place to that of 

Bull, having refused to take or to allow the underproduction. To check the demand, 

use of his name to take proceedings on manufacturers added ac. per lb. to the 

behalf of the plaintiffs, the plaintiffs were P rice \ the only responses they got were in 

justified in bringing this action in their own the shape of telegrams to " ship in any 

name and were entitled to recover from the shape you have." Some manufacturers 

AN INTERESTING CASE AT LAW. defendant Hersee. It was also held that have been compelled to make two or three 

JUDGMENT in a case that cannot fail the defendant Hersee is bound under the new lots of green, 

to be interesting to business men was covenant to pay in full, where the creditors And the demand is not over yet, although 

handed down in the trial court, who have have not signed the agreement now there are more supplies available, and 

Toronto, on Tuesday last. The case was are not willing to take less ; and, having the stringency is not so severe. Ontario 

the outcome of the sale of the assets of the taken and disposed of all the property, and still takes some, while goods cannot be 

estate of The Hamilton Hardware Co., that having thereby taken it out of the control shipped to New Brunswick, Nova Scotia 

assigned two years ago, and were bought by of the creditors, must be held to all the or Prince Edward -Island in too large 

The Dominion Radiator Co., Limited, to consequences. quantities. 

recover the amount owing to it at the time Judgment was given against defendant In the memory of paris green manufac- 

of the failure. Hersee for $1,514.47. but Bull, having, as turers, there has been only one "potato-bug- 

When The Hamilton Hardware Co. assignee, refused to take proceedings against killer" season so late as this, when the 

became insolvent, an assignment was made Hersee, and joining thelatter in the defence, demand ran on into the first week in 

to one Bull, who subsequently transferred was ordered by the court to share in the August, a record likely to be equalled this 

to Mr. Hersee, the president, the assets of costs of the case. Stay of proceedings have, y ear - 

the company in consideration of the latter however, been allowed until September Tombstone advertising is doubtless done 

paying a composition of 40c. on the dollar 17, 1901. with a view to enlivening business. 



• WHEN WRITING ADVERTISERS 
PLEASE M ENTION THAT YOU SAW 
THEIR ADVERTISEMENT IN THIS PAPER 



10 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ST. LAWRENCE ROUTE AND SIR LOUIS DAVIES' 

RESPONSIBILITY. 



THERE no longer seems to be any 
doubt about the retirement of Sir 
Louis Davies from the portfolio of 
Marine and Fisheries. When he is gone 
the Government will be relieved of one of 
its weak members. 

At the time he was taken into the 
Government it was generally thought that 
the Premier had made a wise choice. He 
had a good reputation, as far as any man in 
politics can have a good reputation. It is 
possible he might have been over-rated. 
There might have been portfolios for which 
he was better qualified. But as Minister of 
Marine and Fisheries he has certainly 
proved a lamentable failure. 

Under his regime marine disasters on the 
St. Lawrence route have multiplied, with the 
result that the travelling public fear it and the 
discrimination of marine insurancecompanies 
against it is more decided. And what has 
been done in this way will, we fear, take a 
long time to undo. In the meantime the 
trade and commerce of the country has 
to suffer. 

Sir Louis is not to be blamed for storms 
that arise, for currents that prevail, or for 
rocks that abound. His sins are the sins of 
omission. Not at any time since becoming 
a member of the Government has he shown 
by any act of his that he fully grasped the 
importance of the duties devolving upon 
him, in as far as the St. Lawrence route is 
concerned. Less than a week ago, in an 
interview with a newspaper reporter in 
regard to marine disasters on that route, he 
said : "I have been so far unable to 
discover that the routes are to blame or 
that the aids to navigation are seriously at 
fault." What nonsense ! If we had never 
anything else to judge him by, he has by 
his latest statement out of his own mouth 
proved his unfitness for the Department 
upon whose ptoper administration largely 
depends the reputation of our waterways 
to and from the sea. 

Something certainly has been done under 
his regime for the improvement of the St. 
Lawrence route ; but a great deal more 
should have been done. There has been 
too much of "soul take thy ease" about 



Sir Louis. What is wanted in the Depart- 
ment of Marine and Fisheries is an 
aggressive, not a passive, policy. Sir 
Louis Davies, like Sir Richard Cartwright, 
does not seem to know what this means. 
And when he does do anything he magni- 
fies its importance beyond all sense of pro- 
portion. The stress which he lays on the 
$40,000 spent on the new light at Belle Isle 
is an evidence of that. 

If ever good judgment was demanded in 
the appointment of a Minister of Marine 
and Fisheries it is now. We fully realize 
the difficulties with which the Premier has 
to contend in making the appointment. 
Provincial jealousies crop up and sectarian 
influences arise. But, if the right kind of 
man is to be secured, none of these should 
be factors. 

Sir Wilfrid Laurier was wise in his 
appointments to several of the portfolios, 
such for instance, as that of Public Works, 
Post Office, Customs, Justice, and Agricul- 
ture. These are all occupied by men of a 
practical turn of mind and men who when 
they realize what ought to be done have 
the perseverance and ability to do it. 

There is no finer or more delightful route 
to the sea than the St. Lawrence. It is not 
devoid of dangers ; but where is there a 
route that is? There are none in this 
world. And properly buoyed and lighted 
it will be as safe as any othor, while at the 
same time possessing scenic attractions that 
are equal to any and unsurpassed by no 
other route on this side of the Atlantic. 
But we must have a Minister of Marine and 
Fisheries with an aggressive policy before 
we can hope to have the St. Lawrence route 
put in the condition it ought to be in. 



THE NEW ASSAY OFFICE ANDTRADE 

THE Dominion Government assay 
office, legislation to start which was 
passed at the last session of Parlia- 
ment, was opened on Monday. The plant, 
which is said to be the most modern and 
up to date on the continent, has a capacity 
of about $16,000,000 to $20,000,000 per 
annum. 



It is to be hoped that the establishment 
of the office will have the desired effect of 
attracting a large portion of the Yukon gold 
to Vancouver that has hitherto gone to 
Seattle. And as the Government has 
decided to refund 1 per cent, of the royalty 
the possibilities of gold being brought to 
Vancouver are thereby increased. The 
action of the Government in regard to the 
rebate has given a great deal of satisfaction 
to the business men of Vancouver, but it is 
the opinion of some that the rebate should 
have been made 2^ percent. And we are 
inclined to endorse that opinion, for it is 
worth something to divert to Canadian 
territory the large trade on Yukon account 
that now goes to Seattle. S'.ill, a rebate of 
1 per cent, is not insignificant, meaning as 
it does that a miner can get $100 more for 
every $10,000 worth of gold than he can 
elsewhere, unless, of course, the United 
States Government should offer a similar 
inducement on gold brought to Seattle. 
With this rebate of 1 per cent, the net 
royalty on gold produced in the Yukon will 
be 4 per cent. And it is estimated that the 
rebate will be sufficient to enable miners to 
pay their expenses out of Dawson. 

We understand that it is possible the 
Dominion Government may buy the gold 
outright that is brought to Vancouver, and 
some, at least, of the bankers have ex- 
pressed themselves in favor of the proposal. 

At the last session of the House of Com- 
mons, a Bill was also adopted authorizing 
the Government to establish at Ottawa a 
branch of the Imperial mint. We believe 
it would have been more to the interest of 
Canada if the Bill had authorized the 
establishment of the mint at either Van- 
couver or Victoria, for Yukon gold will still 
go to the mint at Seattle, according to the 
the statements of Vancouver bankers, after 
being assayed in Canadian territory. 



THE INDIGNITY OF LABOR. 

The dignity of labor is all right. What 
is all wrong is the indignity of laboring long 
hours in badly ventilated stores with the 
temperature around 90 degrees, and ,vot 
enough business to stir the atmosphere. 



If common interests will not hold business 
men together, rules and regulations or 
financial penalties never will. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



11 



BRITISH PESSIMISM ON TRADE MATTERS. 

Andrew Carnegie, in "The Nineteenth Century and After," Holds that while British Trade has Reached its Limit it is not Declining 

—No Other Nation Compares with Her in Steel, even in the Aggregate— Great Britain can Work out Her 

Own Salvation by Adopting the Changes Required both by Employer and Workman. 



F 



Oli thirty odd years the writer has 
been visiting his native land, but 
never to find such despondency 
among his friends of the industrial world 
as this year. Even those are now pessi- 
mistic who have hitherto been staunch 
optimists, sound in the faith that the 
Motherland would " someho>v or other 
muddle through " and brilliantly emerge 
from threatened disaster, as she often has 
before in her long, chequered and illustrious 
history. 

There is obviously much in the present 
situation calculated to depress ; but whether 
the true plucky Briton falls from optimism 
— his normal condition — to pessimism de- 
pends upon whether he looks backward or 
forward, as, when human society is viewed 
as a whole, a look forward to ideal condi- 
tions turns us to pessimists, bewailing its 
manifest short-coinings, failures and proofs 
of barbarism ; while the look backward 
reassures us that humanity has crawled 
upward, and must continue to rise, that all 
goes well, though slowly, and we are again 
healthily optimistic. 

So with the anxious Briton just now in 
regard to industrialism. What a picture 
he gazes upon as he looks backward ! He 
sees his country not only the greatest of 
all, but in many of the elements of power 
— in finance, in commerce, manufacturing, 
mining, weaving and shipping — contending 
successfully with all other nations combined. 
Britain in the one scale and the world in 
the other. It is only fifty-five years since 
she ceased to mine more coal than the rest 
of the world, and men still in active life 
have seen her manufacturing more iron and 
steel, weaving by machinery more cotton, 
woollen and linen cloth, owning more ships. 
and making more machinery than all oth- 
ers, and first in wealth and credit. The 
steam engine, bringing steamship navigation 
and railway transportation ; the hot-blast 
and puddling furnace — the roots of modern 
ironmaking ; the Bessemer, Siemens-Martin 
and Thomas processes — the foundations of 
steelmaking ; Arkwright and Hargreaves, 
the founders of machine weaving — all these, 
and others of like importance in other 
hranches of production, the work of this 
land alone, no other making any consider- 
able contribution to manufacturing pro- 
gress : Britain, the lonely pioneer who 
guided the world and led her to modern 
industrialism. 

Turn now from the view backward, and 
behold present conditions, and, presto ! 
What a change ! the optimist exclaims. No 
longer Briton versus the world in anything, 
no longer even first among nations in wealth 
or credit, in manufacturing, mining, weav- 
ing, commerce. Primacy lost in all. In 
seagoing ships still foremost, but even there 
our percentage of the world's shipping 
giowing less every year. It only increased 
46.000 tons in five years from 1894 to 1809. 
and was 9,000 tons less in 1898 than in 
fsWi Worse than all, supremacy lost upon 
the sea in fast monster steamships — those 
unequalled cruisers in war, which now fly 
the German flag, all built in Germany ; 
not one corresponding ship built or build- 
ing in Britain, the field entirely surrender- 
ed to her rival. In ironmaking Germany 
has risen from 1,500,000 to 7,000,000 tons 
per year, while Britain has stood still, her 



highest product being 9,500,000 tons. The 
United States made 13,500,000 tons last 
year, to be exceeded this year, while we are 
making less than last. 

In steel, the United States made 10,638,- 
000 tons last year, and have made this 
year, so far, more than last, while we arc 
falling back from our maximum of 5,000,- 
000 tons of last year. 

In textiles, Lord Mashman tells us in 
The Times that we are exporting less and 
importing more. In 1891 we exported 106 
millions, in 1899, 102 millions sterling ; 
in 1891 imported of textiles 28 millions, and 
in 1899, 33 millions sterling. His Lordship 
avers that Great Britain has not increased 
her export trade one shilling for thirty 
years. 

Financially we are also rapidly losing 
primacy. The daily operations of the New 
York Exchange exceed those of London. Our 
loans at a discount find investors in the 
United States, which, so long our greatest 
debtor, is becoming our chief creditor 
nation. We offer everyone who has confi- 
dence to subscribe our national note for 
£100 if he will give us £93 14s. cash ; 
Consols were at 113, and are now below 
95 ; we spend in two years as much upon 
what was expected to be a mere parade as 
the reductions made in the National Debt 
for fifty years ; and the war is still costing 
one and one-half million sterling per week, 
soon to be increased by new levies at in- 
creased pay. We have just added 1 1 mil- 
lions per year to our taxes when America, 
by a singular coincidence, has just reduced 
taxes by that amount. Britain thus handi- 
capped more, and our rival's weight lessen- 
ed for the industrial race. 

We shall not very long be allowed even 
the boast of having the largest city of the 
world, since New York has to-day three and 
one-half against London's four and one-half 
millions ; and the population of the area 
now New York increased last decade 35 per 
cent., while London's increase is only one- 
fourth as great. At the rate of the in- 
crease for the last five years New York in 
1910 will almost equal Landon— in 1915 out- 
strip her. 

While we have stood still, United States 
exports of manufactured articles have treb- 
led in five years, and now reach 80 millions 
sterling. Our total exports in 1890 were 
£263,531,800, and never again reached that 
sum until 1899, when by adding 6 millions 
for ships built for foreigners, not hitherto 
included, the exports were £264,660,000. 
Our imports increased during that period 
65 millions, partly because we became more 
dependent upon foreign nations for food. 

Until recently foremost in machinery 
making, our tramways and subways are now 
equipped not only with electrical devices, 
but with the huge steam engines required, 
imported from America. France shows ex- 
ports of motor cars, etc., last year valued 
at one million sterling ; we export none, 
and even buy from France. 

The former optimist, now a miserable 
pessimist, continues his lament. As for 
ship-building, how long is primacy even in 
that to be left us when shipplates from 
America reach Belfast and Glasgow by the 
thousands of tons, and to-day America is 
building two 18,000-ton ships ? The cable 
announces the launch of the first, and two 



others are contracted for, of 20,000 tons, 
equal to the monster Celtic. 

Our industrial army proves as much out 
of date as our war army is acknowledged to 
be ; our railways at home and in our colon- 
ies order their rails, bridges and steel cars 
from America. Our men either cannot or 
do not work like the American, as The 
Times Special Commissioner has proved, 
neither do our captains of industry com- 
pare with those in America. 

Our military army system, having broken 
down, is to be reconstructed. The Times 
publishes a letter from Capt. Lee, M.P.. 
ex-Military Attache at Washington, and 
editorially says Capt. Lee 
declares that the American recruits are im- 
measurably superior to our ordinary 
recruits, both in physique and intelligence. 
Their average age is nearly 23 ; average 
height of infantry five feet eight arid a half 
inches ; all of them can read and write ; 
special inquiries are made into their char- 
acter ; and Capt. Lee affirms that in peace 
and war they are practically free from 
serious crime, and that he has never seen 
an American soldier drunk. Lord Lans- 
downe finds 42,000 of our recruits unfit. 

Such the choice morsels from press and 
magazine upon which the discouraged 
Briton feeds. There arc many others of 
similar import ; but having now quoted 
from a recent issue of The Times, we shall 
close the list, although the pessimist no 
doubt continues to dwell upon the contrast 
presented between the backward and the 
present view, meeting all that is offered in 
mitigation or explanation with Hamlet's 
exclamation, "Look here, upon this picture, 
and on this." He will not be comforted. 
Yet comfort is near, which, with your read- 
ers' permission, we shall venture to offer ; 
but before the proper stage of receptivity 
can be reached by our pessimistic friend one 
step is indispensable. He must adjust 
himself to present conditions, and realize 
that there is no use in these days dwelling 
upon the past ; and especially must he cease 
measuring his one country with the forty- 
five countries of the American Union, E 
pluribus unum. It is out of the question to 
compare 41 millions of people upon two 
islands, 127,000 square miles in area, with 
over 500 people per square mile ( England 
and Wales), with 77 millions upon three 
and one-half million square miles, unequaled 
in natural resources, with only 30 people 
per square mile. 

Let us proceed, therefore, upon the only 
reasonable basis, that of man for man, ami 
see what follows, taking up the pessimistic 
points in order. 

First, loss of wealth and credit. Primacy 
of the world is gone in aggregate wealth 
only if the pessimist persists in measuring 
Britain and the American Union, which 
does not approach Great Britain in wealth 
man for man ; with nearly double the popu- 
lation it has only one-fifth more wealth in 
the aggregate. No other nation is in the 
race for primacy with Britain, even in 
aggregate wealth. Not much cause for 
pessimism here, surely. 

Loss of credit is serious : but what 
national credit except Britain's could stand 
an expenditure of four times more than its 
increase of revenue from the same taxes for 
twenty years up to 1896, and on top of 
that, for five years succeeding up to 1901, 



12 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



increased expenditure of no less than 28 
millions sterling per year, when the taxes 
yielded only Hi millions increase. The 
strongest proof of British credit is that it 
is not destroyed ; no other nation could have 
so recklessly disregarded the plainest dic- 
tates of sound finance, in the face of the 
warnings of successive authorities, none 
more stern than those of the present able 
and courageous Chancellor of the Exchequer. 
No matter how a loyal press may claim 
unimpaired credit, the lender says that six 
and one-half per cent, of the amount ad- 
vanced must he deducted because credit is 
impaired. The Chancellor tells the world 
that the limit of present, taxes is about 
reached, and that trade is not expanding. 
The final reply to the pessimist here is 
that the British people will soon be com- 
pelled to change the policy of seeking in- 
creased responsibilities throughout the 
world, of provoking wars, and antagonizing 
not only the Governments, but — a new and 
portentous fact— the peoples of other coun- 
tries, a policy which inevitably demands the 
increased expenditures which have already 
lost for Britain her proud boast of suprem- 
acy in credit— a loss of genuine prestige. 

The back of the weary Titan was already 
bent when he decided to increase his bur- 
den by acquiring acknowledged paramount cy 
in South Africa. Two young republics 
certified to be dead were annexed, but the 
Titan still finds them struggling on his 
back. Whether (he present war was inevit- 
able or not is not here in question. If it 
were inevitable, so much more chary should 
Britain be in assuming responsibilities here- 
after in distant parts of the world which 
carry in their train such (asks: for all 
must see that, it is exposing Britain to dan 
gers from other quarters which may at any 
time reverse the present figures of Consols. 
The wonder is not that these have fallen to 
05, but that, they have remained so high. 
With a return to the policy of peace anil 
good-will towards other nations, and ordin- 
ary prudence in not awakening sleeping 
dogs, and also in expenditure, credit will 
soon be regained. No irretrievable disaster 
has yet occurred, but the danger signal is 
up. 

Even in credit there is only the United 
States whose credit, is better, as shown by 
the prices of its bonds ; but, were it to go 
one-half the distance on the- road to finan- 
cial troubles which Britain for years has 
traversed, it js improbable that even she 
could borrow upon the terms of the last 
addition to the British debt. Primacy in 
credit may yet !»■ regained. 

In mining, weaving, commerce and manu- 
factures primacy has gone only if the pessi- 
mist persists, as before, in measuring 
Britain against the whole American Union. 
No other nation robs her of primacy in 
either of these departments, nor is likely 
to do so. She has still primacy in the 
aggregate, even against the Union, in weav- 
ing and foreign commerce, and in exports 
she is not much behind. Not, much cause 
for discontent here, since against a Union 
of forty-five States she still holds first 
place in two, and is abreast in another 
department. 

in foreign shipping - , it is true, Britain's 
former huge percentage of the world's ship- 
ping declines. How could it be other- 
wise ? But it still exceeds that of any 
nation twice o\er. Her lead is so decided 
that no man living is likely to see it over- 
come. She had 9 million tons of shipping 
in 1 89S ; the American Union had less than 
."> -millions. Germany, 1,700,000, and France 
less than a million. No cause for lying 
awake o' nights mourning over the position 
of Britain in shipping. 



So with the ship-building industry. It 
is true America is fast increasing, and is 
building monster war and merchant ships, 
and that Germany is also, and that both 
will prove competitor ; but when Britain 
builds 805,000 tons per year ( 1898), and 
America only 240,000, and Germany— 
although figures arc not at hand — certainly 
much less, probably not half, it is rather 
premature to take alarm. Britain needs 
and uses more ships than any other nation. 
having coal and manufactures to export and 
bulky food products and raw materials to 
import. She need not be pushed out of 
primacy in ship-owning, for, not needing to 
import so much, America is at a disadvan- 
tage with Britain, who has better loads for 
foreign ports throughout the world, out 
and home for her ships. Therefore, if 
Britain loses primacy in ship-owning, she 
will well deserve to lose it. In ship-build- 
ing before long it is to be another matter. 
She must not fall asleep, for America, with 
her cheap steel and timber and surprising 
workmen, is finely equipped. Here, if 
Britain hold supremacy, she will richly 
deserve the prize. 

As for the serious loss of the Atlantic ex 
press travel, a few words will explain why 
this was inevitable, keeping in view 
Britain's environment. The British steam 
ship lines sailing between Liverpool and 
New York convey passengers to and from 
Britain only, with her 4 1 millions of peo- 
ple. The German lines sailing from Bremen, 
Hamburg, to New York, draw first, from 
the whole of Northern Europe, then touch 
at Southampton, and draw part of the 
British travel, and. not content with this 

augmentation, crossing to Cherbourg, they 
draw from Paris and all Southern Europe. 
Thus three fine streams of travel feed their 
enormous fast ships; the 300 millions of 
Europe are tributary to them ; and home- 
ward from America to Germany they draw 
all who wish or have business with any 
of these millions, for the homeward ships 
touch also at Cherbourg, Southampton or 
Plymouth, and land passengers. Against 
this the British lines have only tributary 
to them forty-one and one-half millions of 
people who desire passage to New York, 
and, returning from America to Britain, 
only those Americans who desire to visit 
the forty. one and one-half millions for 
pleasure or business. It goes without saj 
ing that the German lines must inevitably 
lead in large fast steamers. But no cause 
for pessimism here, because British ship- 
owners are neither unenterprising nor in- 
efficient ; they only show their good sense 
by recognizing the situation, and will hold 
more of the profit of Atlantic travel for 
Britain than if they attempted the impos- 
sible. 

In iionmaking, Germany's fifty-six and 
one-half millions of people may probably ere 
long equal Britain's make, as Germany is 
gaining in population rapidly. But this 
does not mean any reduction of Great 
Britain's output ; it may even increase 
somewhat. Her make, man for man, will 
remain greater than that of any other coun- 
try except the United States. What more 
can be expected. So with steel. Brit- 
ain's 5 million tons product last year was 
nearly half as much as that of the United 
States, and not much behind, man for man, 
a remarkable fact taking conditions into 
account, showing the little giant that 
Great Britain is. No other nation com- 
pares with her in steel, even in the aggre- 
gate. No cause for pessimism here ; but 
an unreasonable man can, of course, easily 
lament his country's decadence, because it 
produces 5 millions instead of ten and one- 
half, which half a continent produces. 



We now come to the question, " Is Brit- 
ish foreign trade declining ? " This has 
been the subject of much discussion of late, 
without result, because the question has 
two parts, which disputants usually ignore. 
Exports are one branch, imports another ; 
the former has decreased per capita, and the 
latter increased. The two combined show 
that British foreign trade is not declining. 
From 1889-08, ten years, exports per head 
declined from £6 13s. lid. to £5 16s. 2d., 
and imports increased from .til 10s. Id. to 
til 14s. Id. These were mostly years of 
low prices ; quantities did not decrease 
materially. The recent rise in prices has 
swollen the value of both imports and ex- 
ports, but as a rule material increase of 
quantities is not shown, except in greater 
imports of foreign food supplies. Even in 
these, however, higher prices account for 
some part of the increase. 

Studying the subject carefully, and avoid- 
ing the tendency to generalize from tem- 
porary causes and values covering only this 
year or that, the writer is satisfied that the 
true answer to the question, " Is British 
trade declining ?" is that it cannot be 
affirmed to be either declining or increas- 
ing, imports and exports combined. It has 
apparently reached its limit, and is not ex- 
panding, having remained practically sta- 
t ionary for, say, ten years. 

ft surprises the writer that so much im- 
portance is attached in Britain to the 
monthly statement of exports and imports, 
as if increase or decrease in these were con- 
clusive proof of prosperity or otherwise. 
Decreased exports may prove that home con- 
sumption is greater — the best of all condi- 
tions. Thus the steel exports of America 
this year will be less than last, because hei 
own demands are greater. Happy country 
that can use its productive capacity for its 
own further development ! Every ton used 
for additions or new undertakings is pro- 
ductive of more productive wealth. Ex- 
ports decrease, but what goes abroad per- 
manently develops directly the receiving 
nation, and only benefits the exporting 
nation temporarily by its manufacture. 
What is used at home develops the produc- 
ing nation, and benefits it permanently. So 
with imports. A decrease in these may 
prove that the nation is more and more 
supplying its own wants. Happy nation 
that can do so ! American imports are 
growing less and less for this reason, and 
reducing the volume of her foreign trade, 
a sie-n of continued development at which 
she rejoices. Last year was one of great 
prosperity for British manufactures. Ex- 
ports of these in many lines declined, but 
the decrease in quantities of exports was 
the best proof of prosperity. There is an- 
other point often overlooked in considering 
exports, viz.. that these are in the aggre- 
gate not to be compared with the amounts 
consumed at home. It is estimated that 
only one-eighth of Britain's production is 
exported. But if we consider only manu- 

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13 



factum! articles, we find that in pig iron 
9 million tons are made and only 1 million 
exported. In coal, less than one-sixth goes 
abroad ; 220 million tons produced, ;56 
million tons (average) exported. In tex- 
tiles, of linen, one-fourth exported, £20,- 
000,000 produced, £5,000,000 exported ; in 
woollen goods, product £50,000,000, £14,- 
000,000 only exported. In cotton goods 
alone does the amount exported reach the 
amount consumed at home. The total an- 
nual exports average £235,000,000 ; if we 
estimate 12 per cent, profit upon these, the 
gajn is £28,000,000. The increase in 
national expenditures dining five years, not 
including the present war cost, is just this 
figure : therefore, should such expenditure 
become permanent, the gain arising from all 
the exports of Britain has been absorbed 
chiefly is supposed Empire-making and its 
inevitable armaments. " The vast interests 
of Britain in China" arc much in evidence 
at present, but shrink upon examination. 
The amount that China takes of British 
products is only £5,000,000 per annum. 
Little Holland takes one-half more, and so 
does Little Belgium ; and the Brazilian 
and the Venezuelan republics each take 
more. A \ay big war can easily be stirred 
up there, costing thousands of lives and a 
hundred millions or two. which cannot 
well be spared, all in the cause of protect- 
ing a paltry five millions worth of trade, 
yielding perhaps, £(100,000 to £700,000. per 
annum profit. Nor is Chinese trade likely 
to increase much, for the Chinese need lit- 
tle that is made by Western nations, (beat 
increase of her consumption of British 
goods is not probable, in the opinion of the 
writer, who has some knowledge, of that 
strange land. 

It is pitiable to see so many lives lost 
and so much money squandered in pursuit 
of shadowy dominion over barren territory 
in far-off, sparsely populated lands, osten- 
sibly to secure new markets lor British 
products. Tin' markets of uncivilized, lands 
amount to so little, and Britain has no ad- 
vantages from her nominal sway under the 
policy of free trade; for trade does not 
follow the flag— it follows the lowest, price 
current. Loyal Canada buys three times 
as much from the United States as from 
Britain. Even her Union .lacks she buys 
in New York. J I' 2s. (kl. per year were 
added to the purchasing power of the Brit- 
ish people for home products, the market 
would be enlarged to the extent f all its 
exports to China ; less than M. per head 
would equal the profit. One pound per 
head would give Britain more new trade 
than her total exports to India and South 
and East Africa combined : or to Canada 
and Australia. China and japan combined; 
to Germany, Italy and France combined ; 
or to the United States, Brazil, Argentine 
and Canada combined, and equal to one- 
half of the total export trade to all British 
possessions, which is £80,000,000 per vear. 
-If the £28,000,000 of increased Government 
expenditure per year incurred during the 
past five years were stopped, and spent by 
the people at home upon British products, 
this would give a new market equaling that 
of Canada, South and East and West 
Africa, Foreign Africa, South and East, 
and the West Indies, Ceylon and Hong 
Kong. Conquering new territory for mar- 
kets abroad is dropping the substance for 
the*\shadow — chasing rainbows. The case 
against this policy is closed. Trade has 
not increased. The true statesman will 
soon turn his attention to the bettering of 
conditions at. home, for it is here that the 
greatest increase for British trade can most 
easily be effected. 

Prominent speakers sometimes state that 
Britain is lightly taxed. Compared with 



Ifs Good Business Policy 

to put lead and oil in the background and S-W.P. 
up in front. 

It's a policy that pays in every sense of the word. 
It's the only policy that can put you on top in the 
paint business. 

The men who are making the best paying in- 
vestment out of the paint business are S-W.P. 
dealers, who aim to sell nothing but 

The Sherwin-Williams Paint 

It is poor judgment to push lead and oil — in 
which there is no profit, no chance to build reputa- 
tion, and less value and satisfaction to your customers 
than in S-W.P. 



The Sherwin-Williams Co. 




CHICAGO. 
NEW YORK, 



PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 

CLEVELAND. 
NEWARK, BOSTON. SAN FRANCISCO. 

MONTREAL, TORONTO, KANSAS CITY. 




Germany and the American Union tins is 

certainly incorrect, and it is these countries 

which Britain has most to fear industrially. 

The British Government's expenditure is 

now close upon £'■', per head ; that ( f the 
United States is £1,* the cost of the 
Spanish and South- African Wars being each 
included. Here is a load of about £80, 
1100,000 per year for the United Kingdom, 
nearly §2 per head with which llie forty- 
one and one half millions of liritons are 
handicapped. This is nearly three times 
the total direct profit made it 12 per cent. 
upon Britain's entire exports. The German 
only [lays £1 7s. (id. per head. 

The last fiscal year left the Republic 
with a surplus of sixteen millions sterling 
after paying ordinary expenditures and the 
Philippine War also. Hence the remission 
of taxes to the extent of eleven millions 
sterling. The Secretary of the Treasury is 
buying up Governlnent bonds with his sur- 
plus revenues. The amount of gold in the 
Treasury was never so great— it recentlj 
approached a hundred millions sterling. 
After British employers and employed 
reach the American standard of econom- 
ical production, Britain will still remain 
heavily handicapped in the industrial race 
by the enormous load of taxation under 
which her producers labor as compared with 
America. 

The debt of the States of the American 
Union is now only 202 million dollars in 
the aggregate, having fallen from 298 mil- 
lion dollars in 1880. This is less than a 



* lu giving the expeudituie of tlie United States 
Government at £1 per head tbe years previous to the 
Spanish War are taken. Taxes to the extent of £11,- 
000 000 have since been abolished.equal to 3s. per head. It 
is out fair, however, to say that last year's permanent 
appropriations were greater than before the war, and 
annual expenditure will be somewhat over £1 to-day, 
notwithstanding the reduction of taxes named. 



million sterling per State, and takes no 
account of the sinking funds, which in many 
cases almost equal the debt. The American 
is surprisingly careful about incurring 
debts, the States and cities being const it a 
tionally prohibited from exceeding certain 
percentages upon the property assessment. 
lie is a strong contrast to the Canadian 
and Australian in this respect. 

The backwardness of Britain in electrical 
machinery and equipment, motor cars, etc., 
is due to the natural conservatism of the 
race. The French are more disposed to 
experiment with novelties, and the maker 
there sees a home demand, which is, as just 
stated, the surest foundation for capturing 
the foreign market. Britain may still over- 
take her quicker neighbor— her new plants 
should soon drive out the latest industrial 
invader ; then exports will begin. It is 
not always he who starts first who ends 
first. The writer expects Britain soon to 
l»' in the front rank here. 

Thus the industrial .situation, sombre as 
it is, and dangerous as it might readily 
become, is not the chief source of danger 
to Britain to-day, because, after an awaken- 
ing more or less rude, and in all respects 
salutary, it can well be left to work out 
its own salvation by adopting the changes 
required both by employer and workman. 
and which are quite within their power, to 
enable the country to maintain its trade in 
competition with others. It is the finan- 
cial and political situation which is alarm- 
ing, for it needs no prophet to foretell that 
a continuance of the aggressive temper 
which alienates oilier Governments and peo- 
ples, and which has mistaken territorial 
acquisition for genuine Empire-making must 
soon strain the nation's power and lay upon 
its productive capacity such burdens as will 



H 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



render it incapable of retaining the present 
volume of trade, which is essentia] to the 
preservation of Britain's position as fore- 
most in the world, financially, commercial- 
ly, and industrially ( American Union, hors 
concours ) . 

If ever a nation bad clear and unmistak- 
able warnings, as the writer thinks, that 
the time has arrived when it should hence- 
forth measure its responsibilities and am- 
bitions throughout the world with its 
resources, and cut its garment according 
to its cloth, it is the dear old Motherland 
of the race, with its trade stationary, an 
iinnj of thirty thousand or more to be pro- 
dded for in South Africa, even after peace 
ies, its expenditures and taxation in- 
creasing, and its promises to pay already 
at, such a discount as to attract capital 
across the Atlantic. Kocks ahead, sure 
enough ; but this does not mean that the 
officers of the ship of State are to drive 
it full steam upon them. On the contrary, 
it should mean that the rocks, being now 
; n sight, will be avoided. 

The prime quality of the race— its " sav- 
ing common-sense," inherent in men of all 
parties— may be trusted to see that the good 
ship Britannia so steers her course here- 
after as to insure her safety and to keep 
her strong for the many long and prosper- 
ous voyages she is destined yet to sail, not 
only for her own advantage, or that of the 
Knglish-speaking race, but, as the writer 
has never ceased to believe, for the advan- 
tage of the world as a whole. 

ANDREW CARNKOIK. 



NEW YORK METAL MARKET. 

There was a marked decline in the 
London copper market this morning which, 
in the absence of particulars, is thought to 
have been due to the weaker tone developed 
here. There were quite free sales of spot 
at ^67 6s. 3d., or 7s. 6d. below last night's 
quotation. Comparatively little business 
was done in the English market in futures, 
which closed 65. 3"!. lower than yesterday. 
In the New York market we heard of no 
business of consequence, although Lake 
was said to be procurable at 16.50c. The 
market closed dull at 16.50 to 17c. for 
Lake Superior and 16.37^ to i6.62^c. for 
electrolytic and casting. 

Pig Tin — There was practically no change 
in the New York market, which is in a state 
of waiting for the result of to-morrow's 
Banca auction sale. There was a sale of 
five tons spot at 27.75c, which was the 
market at the close. For first half of August 
delivery 25 tons sold at 27.35c, while 
August regular was quoted at 26.75c bid 
and 27c asked. Futures were neglected, 
and the only^month on which there was a 
quotation was November, which was offered 
at 26.62 J^c Spot declined in London £1, 
and the movement in it was freer, which 
was taken here as an indication that the 
principal holders are letting go their stocks. 
Three months' tin advanced 2s. 6d. this 
morning, but later fell back to last night's 
quotation. The feeling at the close in the 
English market was reported to be easy. 

Pig Lead — This market remains quiet, 
with business of the hand to-mouth order. 



Prices remain steady, however, on the basis 
of 4.37^0. for lots of 50 tons or more. St. 
Louis was steady at 4.25c for soft Missouri. 
A few cars of chemical hard sold at 4.40c. 
In London a new low record for the year 
was established on soft Spanish, the market 
having declined to £\i 17s. 6d. 

Spelter — The market is still very dull, 
with prices easy at 3 90 to 3 95c The tone 
of the market in St. Louis also is easy, the 
quotation there being 3 80c No change 
in the London market was reported. 

Old Metals — Trade is dull and prices 
nominal and unchanged. 



Iron and Steel — The iron market was 
quiet to day pending the settlement of the 
strike which, it is generally thought, is close 
at hand. Trade in finished material con- 
tinues on a liberal scale, and the outlook is 
favorable for a free movement into con- 
sumption for some months to come. 

Tinplate — There were no fresh devel- 
opments, and there are none expected until 
the negotiations, looking to the settlement 
of the strike, are completed. Meanwhile, 
buyers are inclined to hold off, and very few 
orders are being placed. — New York Jour- 
nal of Commerce, July 31. 



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CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 

DIFFICULTIES, ASSIGNMENTS, COMPROMISES. 

VLEBLANC & CO., general mer- 
chants, Hull, Que., have made an 
• abandonment. 

G. Poboin, general merchant, St. Gedeon, 
Que., has assigned. 

V. Leblanc & Co., general merchants, 
Hull, Que., have made an abandonment. 

E. Soucy, general merchant, Rimouski, 
Que., has made a judicial assignment. 

The creditors of Henry Head, general 
storekeeper, Cloyne, Ont., met br/August 2 

Folland & Co., dealers in stoves >fod 
tinware, Sarnia, Ont., have assigned 
trust. v^^" 

V. E. Paradis has been appointed curatorV 
of J. C. Gagnon, general merchant, St. 
Flavie Station, Que. 

A meeting to appoint a curator for Dionne 
& Co., general merchants and lumbermen, 
Ste. Moise, Que., is called for August 5. 

Honore Thauvette, general merchant, St. 
Lagare de Vaudreuil, Que., has assigned to 
Chartrand & Turgeon. 

Honore Thauvette, general merchant, 
St. Lazare de Vaudreuil, Que., has assigned 
to Chartrand & Turgeon. 

A statement of the affairs of Honore 
Thanvette, general merchant, St. Lazare 
de Vaudreuil, Que., is prepared. 

PARTNERSHIPS FORMED AND DISSOLVED. 

J. Hebert & Co., general merchants, 
Drummondville. Que., have dissolved. 

A. Jennings & Co., wheelwrights, Mont- 
real, have dissolved. 

Joseph Bourgeois & Cie., general mer- 
chants, St. Angele de Laval, Que., have 
dissolved. 

R. G. Gilliland, general merchant, Carie- 
vale, Man., has admitted W. J. Gilliland 
into partnership. 

R. G. Gilliland, general merchant, Carie- 
vale, N.W.T., has admitted W. J. Gilliland 
as partner. 

G. D. Campbell and G. D. Campbell, 
jr., have registered a partnership as G. D. 
Campbell & Co., general merchants. Wey- 
mouth Bridge, N.S. 

A partnership has been registered by G. 
D. Campbell and G. D. Campbell, jr., as 
G. D. Campbell & Co., general merchants, 
Weymouth Bridge, N.S. 

SALES MADE AND PENDING. 

The Gurney Scale Co., Hamilton, Ont., 
have sold out to J. P. Steedman. 

T. A. Picard, sawmiller, Mar, Ont., 
advertises his business for sale. 

The assets of O. St. Jean, hardware 
dealer, Montreal, have been sold. 

J. W. Jack, stove dealer, Truro, N.S., 
has sold his tinware business to W. R. 
Eaton. 



The assets of K. W. A. Debel, depart- 
ment storekeeper, Three Rivers, Que., have 
been sold. 

The assets of Verance Taillefer, general 
merchant, Hawkesburg, Ont., have been 
sold. 

The assets of J. J. Brownley, tinware 
dealer, Halifax, N.S., are advertised for 
sale by sheriff. 

The assets of Venance Taillefer, general 
merchant, Hawkesbury, Ont., have been 
sold. 

The assets of G. Rioux, general mer- 
were sold on 



^ chant, JfoS Pistoles, Que., \ 
»s, ^Tfte^tock of* J. ©Wljurette, 



chant, 
b V 




general mer- 
de Blandford, Que., has 
ar. , 



ioux, 
have 



•Tl^at 7j^T. <(fcrtie doUa 

The stdfckjtjd bool?S4>JU^ L ^ i 
general merchanSd^rqis Pistoles, <$ytf\ 
been sold to Joseph RiffH&. v fr 

The stock of the estate of AlbeK Payne, 
stove dealer, etc., Millbrook, Ont., is adver- 
tised for sale by auction on August 7. 

J. & H. Field, hardware merchants, 
Teeswater, Ont., have sold out to Mann & 
Ewing, who take possession on October 1. 

CHANG F.S. 

Swail Bros, have registered as sign 
painters, etc.. Montreal. 

The Strathcona Coal Co., Limited, Monc- 
ton, N.B., has been incorporated. 

V. Voisson, general merchant, Teeswater, 
Ont., is retiring from business. 

J. F. McBeath, general merchant, Under- 
wood, Ont., is removing to Teeswater. 

V. Voison, general merchant, Teeswater, 
Ont., is retiring from business. 

A. Cameron. gunsmith, Edmonton, 
N.W.T., has gone out of business. 

Murphy, Brown & Co., hardware dealers, 
Well wood, Man., are adding a general 
stock. 

The Dominion General Engineering Co., 
Limited, Montreal, have applied for a 
charter. 

The Bradley, Levy & Weston Machinery 
Co., Limited, Toronto, have obtained a 
charter. 

J. G. McBeath, general merchant, Under- 
wood, Ont., is removing to Teeswater, 
Ont. 



general 
has been 



merchant, 
succeeded 



P. A. McLaurin, 
Vankleek Hill, Ont. 
by Geo. Chalmers. 

P. A. McTaurin, 
Vankleek Hill, Ont., 
by Geo. Chalmers. 

Mrs. W. G. Murdock has registered as 
proprietress of W. G. Murdock & Co., 
confectioners, etc., Montreal. 



general merchant, 
has been succeeded 



FIRES. 

Hubert Malo, blacksmith, Laprarie.Que., 
has been burned out. 

The premises of Alphonse Bonnetteue, 
tinsmith, Laprairie, Que., were damaged by 
fire. 

Howes & Lighton, sawmillers and elec- 
tric light proprietors, Harriston, Ont., have 
been burned out. 

Aime Bourassa, general merchant, 
Laprairie, Que., was burned out last week ; 
partially insured. 

Arthur Beauvais, agent for agricultural 
implements ; Aime Bourassa, general mer- 
chant, and Arsene Bourdon, saddler, La- 
prairie, Que. , have been burned out ; all 
partially insured. 

DEATHS. 

J. J. Melanson, general merchant, Bath- 
urst, N.S., is dead. 

J. J. Melanson, general merchant, 
Bathurst, N.B., is dead. 

S. R. Rootham, of Rootham & Pollard, 
dealers in agricultural implements, Church- 
bridge, N.W.T., is dead. 



CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

A CHART OF THE METRIC SYSTEM. 

The publishers of The Canadian Engineer, 
Toronto, have issued a chart of the metric 
system of weights and measures, which 
will be studied with increased interest at 
the present time, when there is so much 
agitation for the adoption of this system. 
Great Britain, Russia and the United States 
are the only great nations which are not 
using it, and Russia is about to adopt it. 
In the United States a Bill will shortly be 
brought before Congress, and, in all prob- 
ability, be passed, making the metric 
system compulsory in that country, so the 
subject is one in which Canadians may 
soon feel the necessity of taking a much 
deeper interest. 

The Canadian Engineers' chart illustrates 
the entire metric system of weights and 
measures, and shows the relations of the 
different proportions to their English 
equivalents. Two or three full sized 
diagrams give a clearer idea of the extent 
of the principal measures. 



The employes of Cowan & Co., Gait, 
Ont., will spend that city's civic holiday in 
an excursion to Burlington Beach. 

As a result of the Mayor's agitation the 
coal ring in Ottawa is broken, and coal is 
now offered at $5-25 per ton, a reduction of 
$1 75 from recent prices. 

The employes of The Burrow, Stewart & 
Milne Co., Hamilton, held their fourth 
annual picnic on July 27 at the East End 
Incline Park. Games, races, baseball and 
a concert by the Sons of England Band 
were among the features. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



17 



The 
Mower 



1 



THAT WILL KILL 
ALL THE WEEDS 
IN YOUR LAWNS 




If you keep the 
weeds cut so they do 
not go to seed, and 
cut your grass with- 
out breaking the small feeders of roots, the grass 
will become thick and weeds will disappear. The 
Clipper will do it. 



^j^%^pppi^^^ 



CANADIAN PATENT FOR SALE. 
SEND FOR CATALOGUE AND PRICES. 



Clipper Lawn Mower Co. 



NORRISTOWN, Pa. 



BUTLER'S 



FAMOUS 



Sheffield Cutlery. 



Fish and Dessert Knives ; Spoons and Forks ; 
Cabinets and Cases of Cutlery and Plate. 



t*t>TJXI ED" was registered a; 

DULLER Trade Mark, A.D 



as a 
1T68. 



Sole Makers of the celebrated 

"KEEN" Razors, "CAVENDISH" 

brand of Table Knives and Carvers. 



HIGHEST AWARDS. 



SPECIAL MENTION. 



— Full Line of Samples and stock at — 

George Butler & Co.'s 

k&TooM: 62 HOLBORN VIADUCT, EX. 

(Over Snow Hill Station.) 
MANUFACTORY: 

Trinity Works, SHEFFIELD, ENG. 



. SPLINT 

^Atlantic 
defining Co. 



TORONTO 
ONT. 



lilt 
III 



III 



//// 



a™>K\)ST. 



[ELASTIC CARBON~paiktJ 



WILL NOT CPACK.RUN. 



Hardware Merchants, 
Tinsmiths and 
Roofers. 

There is both profit and satis- 
faction in pushing the sale of 



BLISTER OP SCALE, 
WILL STOP LEAKS AN D, 
LAST A LIFE TIME^ 



GREAT PROTECTO R^ 
r l^^^RYTHlNCF^ jj f i 



Elastic 
Carbon 
Paint. 

If you have not handled any, 
write us for prices, circulars, etc. 
7 It's the only paint sold with a 
guarantee attached for 5 years. 



Jarvis and Esplanade Streets. 




18 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 




QUEBEC MARKETS 

Montreal, Aug. 2, 1901. 
HARDWARE. 

ALTHOUGH trade is quite satisfac- 
tory for this time of year, the 
market is rather featureless. The 
chief interest hangs about sheet metals, 
which are extremely scarce on the local 
market and difficult to import before the 
close of navigation. Wires are not moving 
very freely just now, the season's business 
being about over. Nails are still in fair 
request, as are screws, bolts and rivets. 
Large stocks in wholesale hands across the 
border are said to be the only thing that is 
keeping the price of screws down. Binder 
twine is selling well, but trade in harvest 
tools is about over with. Cordage is still 
an active line. It is now said that wringers 
are more plentiful in wholesale hands, but 
washing machines are still unprocurable in 
any quantity, and will be for two or three 
weeks. Paris green is again reported 
active, something quite phenomenal. 

Barb Wire — There is but little demand 



for wire from the country. Stocks in whole- 
salers' hands are of fair size. The price 
is unchanged at $3 05 per 100 lb. f.o.b. 
Montreal. 

Galvanized Wire — A moderate busi- 
ness is passing. We quote : No. 5, $4.25; 
Nos. 6, 7 and 8 gauge, $3.55; No. 9, $3.10; 
No. 10, $3.75 ; No. 11, $3.85 ; No. 12, 
$3.25; No. 13, $3.35; No. 14, $4.25; No. 
15. $4-75; No. 16. $5. 

Smooth Steel Wire — The demand 
has pretty well petered out. We quote 
oiled and annealed as follows : No. 9, 
$2 80; No. 10, $2.87; No. ii. $2.90; No. 
12, $2.95; No. 13, $3 15 per 100 lb. f.o.b. 
Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton, London, St. 
John and Halifax. 

Fine Steel Wire — A small trade in 
this line is reported. The discount is 17^ 
per cent. 

Brass and Copper Wire — The regular 
orders keep coming in, but business is not 
of large proportions. The discount is 55 
and 2% per cent, on brass, and 50 and 2 j£ 
per cent, on copper. 



Fence Staples — But few orders have 
been received this week, and this line is 
now almost stationary. We quote: $3.25 
for bright, and $3.75 for galvanized, per keg 
of 100 lb. 

Wire Nails — There is a fair demand 
for wire nails, with a full supply to meet it. 
We quote : $2.85 for small lots and$2.77J^ 
for carlots, f. o. b. Montreal, London, 
Toronto, Hamilton and Gananoque. 

Cut Nails — Dealers report quite a num- 
ber of small sales. We quote: 82.45 for small 
and $2.35 for carlots ; flour barrel nails, 25 
per cent, discount ; coopers' nails, 30 per 
cent, discount. 

Horse Nails — As yet the demand is 
not heavy, yet there are a few lots mov- 
ing out. The discounts are unchanged. 
"C" brand is held at a discount of 50 
and 7>£ per cent, off the new list 
" M " brand is quoted at 60 per cent 
off old list on oval and city head and 66^ 
per cent, off countersunk head. Monarch's 
discount is 66 2 3 per cent., and 70 per cent. 
in 25 box lots. 



v%i "Famous" 
Cornwall 




Steel Range. 

Made in 6 styles and 4 sizes. 

Burns coal, coke or wood. 

Coal and wood linings always sent. 

Highly polished hammered steel body 
makes a beautiful contrast with its profusely 
nickeled parts. 

The " Cornwall " is the best cooking, the 
most economical, durable and handsome steel 
range made in Canada. 

Write for free booklets, just printed, which 
include all our steel ranges. 






The M'Clary Mfg. Co. 

LONDON, TORONTO. MONTREAL, 

WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER, 

and ST. JOHN, N.B. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



19 



THE PAGE-HERSEY 

IRON & TUBE GO. 



Limited 



Montreal 



Manufacturers of j 



Wrought Iron Pipe 

For Water, Gas, Steam, Oil, 
Ammonia and Machinery. 



DRAIN PIPES, 
PORTLAND CEMENTS, 
FIRE BRICKS AND CLAY 
SILICA AND MAGNESIA 
BRICKS, 

with specially prepared mortar. 

Contractors' and Founders' 
Supplies. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

31 WELLINGTON ST., MONTREAL 

. . FULL STOCK . . 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SfWEPK 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

'he CANADIAN SEWER PIPE CO. 

HAMILTON, ONT. TORONTO. ONT. 

ST. JOHNS. QUE. 



Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Hunt aoturers of 



Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND "DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery where great strength 
B required ; Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



Horseshoes — Horseshoes are in small 
request at this season of the year. We quote : 
Iron shoes, light and medium pattern, No. 
2 and larger, $3.50; No. 1 and smaller, 
$3.75 ; snow shoes, No. 2 and larger, 
$3-75 ; No. 1 and smaller, $4.00 ; X L 
steel shoes, all sizes, 1 to 5, No. 2 and 
larger, 5553.60; No. 1 and smaller, $3.85 ; 
feather-weight, all sizes, $4.85; toe weight 
steel shoes, all sizes, $5.95 f.o.b. Montreal; 
f.o.b. Hamilton, London and Guelph, 10c. 
extra. 

Poultry Netting — Business is rather 
slow in this line. The discount is 55 per 
cent. 

Green Wire Cloth — The demand for 
this article has dropped off. but there are 
still some lots moving. Wequote $1.35. 

Screen Doors and Windows — Fair 
quantities are still selling at former prices. 
We quote : Screen doors, plain cherry 
finish, 87.30 per doz. do. fancy, $1 1.50 per 
doz.; walnut, $7.30 per doz., and yellow, 
$7.45; windows, $2.25 to $3 50 per doz. 

Screws — There is a regular sorting de- 
mand for screws. The market is firm and 
prices only restrained, it is said, by large 
stocks in wholesale hands in the United 
States. Discounts are : Flat head 
bright, 87^ and 10 per cent, off list; 
round head bright, 82^ and 10 percent.; 
flat head brass, 80 and 10 per cent.; round 
head brass, 75 and 10 per cent. 

Bolts — Bolts are in regular request. 
Discounts are as follows : Norway carriage 
bolts, 65 per cent. ; common, 60 per cent.; 
machine bolts, 60 per cent. ; coach screws, 
70 per cent. ; sleigh shoe bolts, 72^ per 
cent.; blank bolts, 70 percent.; bolt ends, 
62%, percent.; plough bolts, 60 percent.; 
tire bolts, 67^ per cent.; stove bolts, 67% 
per cent. To any retailer an extra discount 
of 5 per cent, is allowed. Nuts, square, 4c. 
per lb. off list ; hexagon nuts, \%c. P* r lb- 
off list. To all retailers an extra discount of 
%c. per lb. is allowed. 

Building Paper — There is hardly as 
much being shipped now as some weeks 
ago, still there are fair amounts moving at 
unchanged prices. We quote as follows : 
Tarred felt, $1.70 per 100 lb.; 2-ply ready 
roofing, 80c. per roll ; 3-ply, 51.05 per roll; 
carpet felt, $2.25 per 100 lb.; dry sheath- 
ing, 30c. per roll ; tar sheathing, 40c. 
per roll; dry fibre.'soc. per roll; tarred fibre, 
60c. per roll ; O.K. and I.X.L., 65c. per 
roll ; heavy straw sheathing, 528 per ton ; 
slaters' felt, 50c. per roll. 

Rivets and Burrs — Fair quantities 
are wanted. Discounts on best iron rivets, 
section, carriage, and wagon box, black 
rivets, tinned do., coopers' rivets and 
tinned swedes rivets, 60 and 10 percent.; 
swedes iron burrs are quoted at 55 per 



CANADA PLATES, 

Half Bright. 

RUSSIA IRON, 
INGOT TIN, 2?=KndF.» 
SHEET ZINC, " VM " 



Genuine and 
Imitation. 



Brand. 



In stock at Montreal. Low prices to 
wholesale trade. 



A. C. LESLIE k CO. 

MONTREAL. 




IRON AND 
BRASS 



Pun 



Foroe, Lift and Cistern 
Hand and Power. 

For all duties. We can 
supply your wants with 
— quality the best and 
prices right. Catalogues 
and full information for a 
request. 



THE 3. HcDOUGALL CO., Limited 

Manufacturers, Gait, Canada. 

ADAM HOPE & CO. 

Hamilton, Ont. 

We offer from stock 

Coke Tin Plates I C 14x20, 
" I C 20x28, 
Galvanized Sheet Iron, 

"Comet" and American Brands. 

L. and F. Ingot Tin, 
Straits Tin, 
Ingot Copper, 
Pig Lead, Spelter and Antimony, 

Nova Scotia Steel Go. 

Limited 

NEW GLASeOW, N.8. 

Manufacturers of 

Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMENS MARTIN 

Open Hearth Steel 



20 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ELASTILITE 



HAS BECOME 

FAMOUS 




We know how to make good 
Varnish. 

We have the Capital and 
proper facilities for ageing 
the Varnish. 

Having an expert to test it, 
we know when it is thor- 
oughly ripened and ready 
to send out. 

It is put up in neater pack- 
ages than any other. 

No other Varnish has such 
attractive and useful adver- 
tising matter. 

Elastilite is always good. 



MANUFACTURED ONLY BY 



i e Imperial Varnish & Color Co. 



TORONTO, ONT., CANADA. 



LIMITED 



Binder Twine Binder Twine 

The John Bowman 

Hardware & Coal Co., 

London, Ont. 

We can supply for immediate shipment : 

Peoria Standard Twine, 500 feet, 
Consumers Cordage Co.'s Red Cap, 000 feet. 
Consumers Cordage Co.'s Blue Ribbon, 650 feet. 

Shipment guaranteed day order is received. 

Binder Twine Binder Twine 



cent, off; copper rivets, 35 and 5 percent, 
off; and coppered iron rivets and burrs, 
in 5-lb. carton boxes, are quoted at 60 
and 10 per cent, off list. 

Binder Twine — A good business is being 
done and there are "scare" reports of a 
coming shortage. How true they are 
remains to be seen. We quote as follows : 
Blue Ribbon, ii^c. ; Red Cap, 9^c ; 
Tiger, 8^c; Golden Crown, 8c; Sisal, 
8#c. 

Cordage — Cordage is still one of the 
active lines. Manila is worth i3J^c per lb. 
for 7-16 and larger; sisal brings 10c. and 
lathyarn, 10c. 

Harvest Tools — The season's trade is 
now about over. The discount is 50, 10 
and 5 per cent. 

Spades and Shovels — Inquiries are 
not numerous yet. The discount is 40 and 
5 per cent. 

Firebricks — Little new business has 
come to hand this week. The local trade 
is fair. We quote : Scotch at $17.50 to $22 
and English at $17 to $21 per 1,000 ex 
wharf. 

Cement — There is no change worthy of 
mention in the cement market, which is 
steady under a moderate demand. We quote 
as follows : German cement, $2.25 to 
$2.40; English, 82.20 to 82.35 ; Belgian, 



$1.65 to $1.95 per bbl. ex wharf, and 
American, $2.15 to 82.30, ex cars. 

METALS. 

The sheet metal market is decidedly 
strong at the moment, due not only to the 
American strike and the buoyant feeling in 
England, but also to the scarcity of goods 
on the Montreal market. Black sheets are 
almost unobtainable, while Canada plates, 
tinplates and terne plates are in light 
supply. Arrivals are very slow and it is 
now difficult to get new orders filled before 
the close of navigation. 

Fig Iron — Foundrymen are not inclined 
to buy pig iron very freely, as they believe 
the heavy production in Canada will mean 
low prices. Summerlee is worth 820 to 
820. 50 ex wharf and Canadian pig $ 1 7. 50 to 
$18 per ton. 

Bar Iron — Bar iron is firm and selling 
freely at8i.85 for merchants' bar and 82. 10 
to 82.15 for horseshoe. 

Black Sheets — Black sheets are hard 
to find on the local market, and what there 
are bring heavy premiums. Shipments are 
expected, but how soon goods will arrive 
no one seems to know. The demand is 
brisk. We quote : 28 gauge, 82.70 to 
82 80; 26 gauge, 82.65 to 82.75, and 
8 to 16 gauge, 82.60 to 82.70 

Galvanized Iron — The market is firm 



under a bri-k demand. We quote as fol- 
lows : No. 28 Queen's Head, 84 40 ; 
Apollo, 10^ oz., 84-4o; Comet, 84.15. 
with 25c. extra in less than case lots. 

Copper — Is steady at 17^ to 18c. 

Ingot Tin — Prices are steady at 32 to 
33c. The demand is good. 

Lead — There has been no change from 
our quotations of last week, 83-4° to $3.50. 

Lead Pipe — There is still a good trade 
doing. We quote : 7c. for ordinary and 
7%c. for composition waste, with 30 per 
cent. off. 

Iron Pipe — The market is firm and 
active. We quote : Black pipe, %, 82.80 
periooft.; ft, 82.80; %,$z\ U, 83-3°; 
i-in., 84-75; l %> J6.45 ; \%, 87-75; 
2-in. $10.35. Galvanized, #, 84-6o; %, 
85.25; i-in., 875°.' II X. 59-8o; iJi, 
811.75 ; 2-in., 816. 

Tinplates — The English manufacturers 
say they cannot undertake contracts for 
September or October shipment. Goods 
here are in light supply and supplies coming 
forward are not heavy. We quote : Coke 
plates, 83-75 to 84; charcoal, 8425 to $4-fJ, 
extra quality, $5 to $5.10. 

Canada Plate — English quotations are 
bullish and early shipments are being con- 
tracted for at a premium. Stocks here are 
light and goods seem to be urgently 
needed. We quote as follows: 52's, $2.55; 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



21 



60' s, $2.65 ; 75's, $2.70 ; full polished, 
$3.10, and galvanized, $4.00. 

Steel — Unchanged. We quote : Sleigh- 
shoe, $2 ; tire, $2.05 ; bar, $2; spring, 
$2.75 ; machinery, $2.75, and toe-calk, 
$2.50. 

Sheet Steel — We quote : Nos. 10 to 
20, 52.50. 

Tool Steel— Black Diamond, 8c. and 
Jessop's, 13c. 

^erne Plates — This is another line that 
is in light supply. Prices have been raised 
25 to 50c. during the week. Dealers are 
now asking $7.75 to $8. 

Coil Chain — Some varieties are in 
moderate request, but the general movement 
is not heavy. We quote: No. 6, I2j£c; No. 
5,io#c; No. 4, ioc.; No. 3, g'Ac; %-'m., 
7%c. per lb.; 5-16, $4.75; 5- 16 exact, 
55.20; yi, $4.20; 7-16, $4; #, $3.80; 
9-16, $3.70; %, 53-5°: X> 53-45 ; #• 
53.40 ; i-in., $3.40. In carload lots an 
allowance of ioc. is made. 

Sheet Zinc — Unchanged at #5. 75 to $6. 

Antimony — Quiet, at 10c. 

Zinc Spelter — Is worth 5c. 

Solder — We quote : Bar solder, 1 8 !£c. ; 
wire solder, 20c. 

GLASS. 

The regular trade is being done in glass. 
The market is steady. We quote as follows: 
First break, $2. 10; second, 52.20 for 
50 feet ; first break, 100 feet, 53.90 ; 
second, $4.10; third, $4.60; fourth, $4.85; 
fifth, 55.35 ; sixth, 55.85, and seventh, 

56.35- 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

The featuie continues to be the call for 
paris green. Even in the West there is a 
stray request heard for the poison, which 
shows that the .general season has been 
very late. Dealers now seem to have 
enough goods to meet any demand that 
may come upon them. The Maritime 
Provinces have received good quantities by 
express. Linseed oil is a little weak for 
future delivery, but steady and firm on 
spot. Paints continue in good request. 
We quote as follows : 

White Lead — Best brands. Government 
standard, $6.25 ; No. I, 55.87^ ; No. 2, 
55.50; No. 3, 55-I2X. an d No. 4, 54.75 
all f.o.b. Montreal. Terms, 3 per cent, cash 
or four months. 

Dry White Lead — 55.25 in casks ; 
kegs, 55.50. 

Red Lead — Casks, 55 00 ; in kegs, 
55.25. 

.jjDry White Zinc — Pure.dry, 6#c. ; No. 
*. \% c -\ in oil, pure, 7%c; No. 1, 6#c; 
No. 2, 5X C - 

Putty— Wequote : Bulk, in barrels, 51. 90 
per 100 lb.; bulk, in less quantity, 52.05 ; 
bladders, in barrels, 52.10; bladders, in 
100 or 200 lb. kegs or boxes, 52.25; in tins, 



THE 



Metallic 
Roofing 

Company l-m.ted 



Eastlake 




Steel Shingles 



$or 



R£TL -iNED 



APR 11 



R06$^ 



THE 



There's truest economy 
in choosing 

"EASTLAKE' 

«3 1 i,t .Ls « « « 

SHINGLES 

They last indefinitely. 

Are fire, lightning, rust and 
leak-proof. 

Fit together perfectly by means 
of their special patented side lock, 
can't possibly work apart. 

GALVANIZED "EASTLAKES" 
are heavily coated on both sides 
with all the galvanizing material 
that will adhere to them. 

PAINTED "EASTLAKES" are 
thoroughly covered on both sides 
with Sherwin-Williams best paint. 

"Eastlakes" have been tested 
by years of service in all climates, 
everywhere giving thorough, lasting 
satisfaction. 

Write and let us give you further 
information. 




Toronto, Canada 



' ' ¥ 



K 



A\P 



52.55 to 52.65 ; in less than 100-lb. lots, 
53 f.o.b. Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, 
Hamilton, London and Guelph. Maritime 
Provinces ioc. higher, f.o.b. St. John and 
Halifax. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 83c; boiled, 86c. 
in 5 to 9 bbls., ic. less, 10 to 20 bbl. lots, 
open, net cash, plus 2c. for 4 months. 
Delivered anywhere in Ontario between 
Montreal and Oshawa at 2c. per gal. advance 
and freight allowed. 

Turpentine — Single bbls., 55c; 2 to 4 
bbls., 54c; 5 bbls. and over, open terms, 
the same terms as linseed oil. 

Mixed Paints — 51.20 to $1.45 per gal. 

Castor Oil — %% to 9^c. in wholesale 
lots, and j£c. additional for small lots. 

Seal Oil — 47 J£ to 49c. 

Cod Oil— 32^ to 35c. 

Naval Stores — We quote : Resins, 
52.75 to 54.50, as to brand ; coal tar, 5325 
t0 $3-75 ; cotton waste, 4J4 to SJ^c. for 
colored, and 6 to 7%c for white ; oakum, 
5>£ to dyic, and cotton oakum, 10 to 11c. 



Paris Green — Petroleum barrels, i8^c. 
per lb. ; arsenic kegs, 19c; 50 and 100- 
lb. drums, I9^c. ; 25-lb. drums, 20c; 1 -lb- 
packages, 20 y£c.\ j£-lb. packages, 22 %c.\ 
i-lb. tins, 2\%z.\ '/£-\b. tins, 23j£c. f.o.b. 
Montreal; terms 3 percent. 30 days, or four 
months from date of delivery. 

SCRAP METALS. 

No stir has entered into the scrap metal 
market this week and things are drifting 
along. Dealers are now paying the follow- 
ing prices in the country : Heavy copper 
and wire, 13 \i to 14c. per lb.; light 
copper, 12 to 12 l4c. ; heavy brass, 12 to 
\2)4c. ; heavy yellow, 9c. ; light brass, 
6>£ to 7c; lead, 2% to 2^"c. per lb.; 
zinc, 2% to 2j£c; iron, No. 1 wrought, 514 
to 515 per gross ton f.o.b. Montreal; No. 5 
cast, 513 to 514; stove plate, $8 to 59; light 
iron, No. 2, 54 a ton; malleable and steel, 
54; rags, country, 60 to 70c. per 100 lb.; old 
rubbers, 6% to 7#c. per lb. 
HIDES. 

The increased prices are well maintained 
under active trading. We quote as fol- 
lows : Light hides, 7^c for No. i;6^c. for 
No. 2, and SH C - for No. 3. Lambskins, 
2oc. ; sheepskins, $1 ; calfskins, ioc. for 
No. 1 and 8c. for No. 2. 



22 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Toronto, Aug. 2, 1901. 
HARDWARE. 

THE week has not been characterized 
by any particularly new features, as 
far as the wholesale hardware trade 
is concerned. Business, for this time of the 
year, keeps good and prices rule steady to 
firm. Wire nails are going out well in small 
quantities. Bolts, rivets and burrs and 
screws continue in good demand. Very 
little is being done in fence wires. The 
demand for rope shows signs of being fairly 
well satisfied for the time being. Quite a 
little binder twine has been moving, par- 
ticularly on Northwest account and stocks 
are getting pretty well reduced. Business 
is opening up in such fall goods as horse 
blankets, cow chains, sleigh bells, etc. 

Barb Wire — An odd half ton and ton 
lot is going out, but business is not large. 
We quote : $3 05 per 100 lb. from stock 
Toronto; and $2 82^ f.o.b. Cleveland for 
less than carlots, and 82.70 for carlots. 

Galvanized Wire— There is very little 
call for this line. We quote as fol- 
lows : Nos. 6, 7 and 8, 83.50 to 83.85 
per 100 lb., according to quantity ; No. 9, 
82.85 to $3. 15 ; No. 10, 83-6o to 83-95 ; 
No. 11, 83-7° t0 84 10 ; No. 12, 83 to 
8330 ; No. 13, 83 1° to 83 4° I No. 14, 
84 10 to 84 50 ; No. 15. 84 60 to 85 05 : 
No. 16, 8485 to 85-35- Nos. 6 to 9 base 
f.o.b. Cleveland are quoted at $2.57^ in 
less than carlots and 12c. less for carlots of 
15 tons. 

Smooth Steel Wire — Quite a little 
demand is being experienced for hay- 
baling wire. Net selling prices for oiled and 
annealed are as follows : Nos. 6 to 8, $2 90; 
9, 8280; 10, 82.87 ; 11, 82.90 ; 12, 82.95; 

13. 8315; H. 83-37; 15. #3-5°; l6 > 
83 65. Delivery points, Toronto, Hamilton, 
London and Montreal, with freights equal- 
ized on those points. 

Wire Nails — Business is keeping up 
well. Orders are for small lots. The base 
price is 82.85 for less than carlots, and 
$2.77% for carlots. Delivery points 
Toronto, Hamilton, London, Gananoque 
and Montreal. 

Cut Nails — Very little doing, and the 
demand has even fallen off for shingle nails. 
Base price is 82.45 per keg for less than 
carlots, and $2. 35 for carlots. Delivery 
points : Toronto, Hamilton, London, 
Montreal and St. John, N.B. 

Horse Nails — Business is still of small 
proportions. Discount on "C" brand, 
oval head, 50 and 7% per cent, off new 
list, and on "M" and other brands, 50, 
10 and 5 percent, off the old list. Counter- 
sunk head 60 per cent. 

Horseshoes — Trade continues season- 
ably quiet. We quote f.o.b. Toronto : Iron 



shoes, No. 2 and larger, light, medium and 
heavy, 83.60 ; snow shoes, 8385 ; light 
steel shoes, 83 70; featherweight (all sizes), 
84-95 ; i ron shoes, No. 1 and smaller, light, 
medium and heavy (all sizes), 83-85 ; snow 
shoes, 84 ; light steel shoes, 83-95; feather- 
weight (all sizes), 84 95- 

Screws— A steady and satisfactory trade 
continues to be done. Discounts are : Fiat 
head bright, %7% and 10 per cent. ; round 
head bright, 82^ and 10 per cent. ; flat head 
brass, 80 and ioper cent.; round head brass, 
75 and 10 per cent. ; round head bronze, 
65 per cent., and flat head bronze at 70 
per cent. 

Rivets and Burrs — Trade is quite 
brisk, with prices steady. We quote : 
Iron rivets, 60 and 10 per cent.; iron 
burrs, 55 per cent.; copper rivets and 
burrs, 25 and 5 per cent. 

Bolts and Nuts — A large business is still 
being done. We quote: Carriage bolts (Nor- 
way), full square, 65 per cent. ; carriage 
bolts full square, 65 per cent. ; common 
carriage bolts, all sizes, 60 per cent.; 
machine bolts, all sizes, 60 per cent. ; coach 
screws, 70 per cent. ; sleighshoe bolts, 72 j£ 
per cent. ; blank bolts, 60 per cent. ; bolt 
ends, 62^ per cent.; nuts, square, 4c. off; 
nuts, hexagon, 4j£c. off; tire bolts, 67 # 
per cent.; stove bolts, 67% ; plough bolts, 
60 per cent. ; stove rods, 6 to 8c. 

Rope — The season is pretty well over for 
rope for hay-fork purposes, although there 
is still some movement. The base price of 
manila is unchanged at 13 %c. per lb. and 
sisal at 10c. 

Binder Twine — A fair sorting up trade 
is being done, and stocks are getting pretty 
well reduced. The demand is chiefly on 
Northwest account. We quote : Pure 
manila, 650 ft., 12c; manila, 600 ft., g}4c.\ 
mixed, 550 ft., 8^c; mixed, 500 ft., 8 to 
8*c. 

Sporting Goods — There is a good move- 
ment in metallic cartridges, loaded shells, 
guns and rifles. 

Cutlery — A small sorting up trade only 
is being done. 

Enamelled Ware and Tinware — 
A brisk demand is being experienced for 
preserving kettles of all sizes, and a fairly 
good trade is being done in tinware. 

Mechanics' Tools— A good movement 
is reported. 

Green Wire Cloth — An odd roll is 
going out at $1.35 per 100 square ft. 

Screen Doors and Windows— Quite a 
good movement is still being experienced 
for screen windows, particularly for this 
late in the season. Very little is being done 
in doors. We now quote as follows : 
Screen doors, 4 in. styles, 8720 to #7.80 
per doz.; ditto, 3 in. styles, 20c. per doz. 



OAKEY'S 



The original and only Genuine Pre- 
paration for Cleming Cutlery. 
6d. and is. Canisters. 

WELLINGTON ' 

KNIFE POLISH 



JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass an* 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, London, England. 

Agent : 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL 



COVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, N Y. 

Steel Carriage and 

Wagon Jacks, 

Harness Snaps, Chain, Rope and Web 
Goods, etc. 

FOR SALE BV JOBBERS AT MFRS. PRICES. 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 




Large* Variety. 

Toilet, Hand, Electric Power 

ARE THE BEST. 

Higheat Quality Grooming and 
Sheep-Shearlni Machlnea 

WE MAKE THEM. 

■DTD FOB OATALOGnt TO 
aaarlaa. Skaarar Ifg. Co., Haiaaa, R.H..C8I 




NEWMAN'S PATENT 
INVINCIBLE FLOOR SPRINGS 

Combine all the qualities desirable in a Door Closer. I 
They work silently and effectually, and never get | 
out of order. In use in many of the public build- 
ings throughout Great* Britain and the Colonies. 
MADE SOLELY BY 

W. NEWMAN & SONS, Birmingham. 



Oneida Community Goods 

HALTERS, COW TIES, SNAPS, etc., etc., 

in all sizes and styles. May be had of all 
jobbers throughout Canada. 

Factory— NIAGARA FALLS, ONT. 



Mackenzie Bros. 

HARDWARE 
MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS, 

Travellers covering Manitoba, : WINNIPEG 
Northwest Territories and ! 
British Columbia. * MAN. 

Correspondence Solicited. 



THE PULLMAN PNEUMATIC 

Combined 



Door Check 
and Spring. 




for Screen Doors. Small, Simple, Strone, Perfect and 
Ornamental. Low in Pi ice. 

PULL/WAN SASH BALANCE CO.. 

ROCHESTER, N.Y., U SA 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



less ; screen windows, |i.6o to $3.60 per 
doz., according to size and extension. 

Building Paper — A fair trade is 
being done. We quote : Building paper, 
30c. ; tarred paper, 40c, and tarred 
roofing, $1 65. 

Harvest Tools — The season is pretty 
well over, but there is still some demand, 
particularly from the northern part of the 
country. Discount, 50, 10 and 5 per 

Spades and Shovels — Small lots only 
are moving. Discount, 40 and 5 per cent. 

Fall Goods — A good many orders are 
being taken for horse blankets, cow chains, 
sleigh bells, axes, snow shovels, cross cut 
saws, for fall delivery. 

Hinges — There is quite a good movement 
in barn door hinges, barn door tracks and 
barn door hangers. 

Cement — Prices remain firm at last 
week's quotations. The demand is good. 
We quote barrel lots as follows : Canadian 
Portland, $2.25 to $2.75; German, $3 to 
53 .15; English, $3; Belgian, $2 50 to $2. 75; 
Canadian hydraulic, $1.25 to $1 50. 

METALS. 

A fairly brisk trade is being done in most 
lines of metals in the way of prompt ship- 
ment. 

Pig Iron — Very little is being done and 
the tone of the market is rather easy. No. 
2 Canadian iron is quoted at from $17.50 
to $18 on track, Toronto. 

Bar Iron — A brisk business is still be- 
ing done, and the mills are so pressed with 
work that they cannot fill orders. The ruling 
price isjjSi 85 per 100 lb. 

Steel — A stiff market is still the feature. 
Wequote: Merchantable cast steel, 9 to 15c. 
per lb. ; drill steel 8 to 10c. per lb ; "BC" 
and "Black Diamond" tool steel, 10 to nc; 
Jessop's, Morton's and Firth's tool steel, 
12^ to 13c. ; toe calk steel, $2.85 to #3; 
tire steel, $2 30 to $2.50; sleighshoe steel, 
$2.10 to $2 25 ; reeled machinery steel, 
53; hoop steel, $3 10. 

Galvanized Sheets— The demand for 
shipment from stock has been brisk during 
the week. The ruling quotation on 28 gauge 
is $4. 50 for English, and $4 40 for American. 

Black Sheets — Business is good. We 
quote : Common, $3 15 for 28 gauge and 
dead flat $3.50 for 26 gauge. 

Canada Plates — A little better move- 
ment has been experienced during the past 
week, and stocks are light. We quote all 
<$%}, 52.90; half polished, $3; and all bright, 

53-5°- 

Tin — While the market has not been 
marked by nearly as sharp fluctuations as a 
week ago, it is still rather easy. Locally, 
trade is confined to small lots at 31^ to 
32c. per lb. 




NICHOLSON 



'1 L_l 



OO., 



Providence, R.I., U.S.A. 



BRITISH PLATE GLASS COMPANY, Limited. 



Established 1773 



Manufacturers of Polished, Silvered, Bevelled. Chequered, and Rough Plate Glass. Also 

O r a durable, highly-polished material called " MARBLETTE," suitable for Advertising Tablets, Signs, 
fcacias, Direction Plates, Clock Faces, Mural Tablets, Tombstones, etc. This is supplied plain, embossed, 
or with incised gilt letters. Benders, Embossers, Brilliant Cutters, etc., etc. Estimates and 
Designs on application. 
Works : Ravenhead, St. Helens, Lancashire. Agencies : 107 Cannon Street, London. EC — 128 Hope Street, Glas- 
gow — 12 East Parade, Leeds, and 36 Par dise Street, Birmingham Telegraphic Address: "Glass, St. Helens" 
Telephone No. 68 St. Helens. 

F"OR SALE 



RE-LAYING RAILS 



350 tons 56. rail and fastenings. 
75 tons 50. " " " 

20 tons 14. " 



Prompt Deliveries. Also Logging and Pit Rails. 

SESSENWEIN BROS., 101 Shannon Street, MONTREAL. 



Tinplates — A fair amount of business is 
being done for this time of the year. The 
mills in Great Britain are reported to be 
well booked with orders till the fall. Stocks 
of tinplates in Swansea on July 13 were only 
40,368 boxes, against 212,620 boxes the 
corresponding date last year. 

Tinned Sheets — A good trade has been 
done during the past week. We quote 
S)4c. as the ruling price for 28 guage. 

Terne Plates — Trade is quiet, with I.C. 
quoted at 59. 

Copper — A fair trade has been done in 
ingot copper and a good trade in sheet copper. 
We quote ingot at iy^c, bars at 23 to 
25c, sheet at 24 to 24j£c, and planished 
at 32c. The outside markets are easier. 

Brass — A moderate business is being 
done at 10 per cent, discount for rod and 
sheet. 

Solder — Business is good and prices 
unchanged. We quote : Half and half, 
guaranteed, iq^c; ditto, commercial, 19c; 
refined, i8^c, and wiping, 17c. 

Iron Pipe — Business is fairly good. 
Black pipe is quoted at 55 40 for 1 in. and 
galvanized at $j 95 per 100 feet. 

Boiler Tubes — The demand is good, 
and, as it is difficult to get supplies on ac- 
count of the strike in the United States, 
prices are firmer. Business is now practi- 
cally confined to merchants who have stock. 

Lead — Trade is quiet and prices un- 
changed at 4X to 4>£c. per lb. 

Zinc Spelter — A little more activity is 
to be reported this week. We still quote 
5^ to 6c. per lb. 

Zinc Sheets — A fair demand is being 
experienced. We quote cask lots at 6^c. 
and smaller quantities at 6|/c. per lb. 

Antimony — Trade is quiet at 10^ to 
nc. per lb. 



PAINTS AND OILS. 

Trade remains quiet, and no change in 
prices are to be noted. Prices are firm on 
oils, and linseed may possibly reach a high 
figure before long. We quote as follows : ' 

White Lead — Ex Toronto, pure white 
lead, $6.37^ ; No. 1, $6; No. 2. $5.67^ ; 
No. 3, $5.25; No. 4, 54 87 l i ; genuine 
dry white lead in casks, $5.37^. 

Red Lead — Genuine, in casks of 560 lb. 
$5.25; ditto, in kegs of ioo lb., $5.50 ; No. • 
1, in casks of 560 lb., $4. 50; ditto, kegs of 
100 lb., #4.75. 

Litharge — Genuine, 6% to 6^c. 

Orange Mineral — Genuine, 7^ to 8c. 

White Zinc — Genuine, French V.M., in 
casks, $7 to 57.25; Lehigh, in casks, $6. 

Paris White — 90c. to $1 per 100 lb. 

Whiting — 65c. per 100 lb. ; Gilders' 
whiting, 80c. 

Gum Shellac — In cases, 22c; in less 
han cases. 25c. 

Paris Green — Bbls., 18 J^c. ; kegs, 19c. ; 
50 and 100 lb. drums, VjyLc, 25 lb. drums, 
20c; 1 lb. papers, 20j£c. ; i-lb. tins, 2iy£c.; 
j£-lb. papers. 22^c; J^-lb. tins, 23^0. 

Putty — Bladders, in bbls., 52.10; blad- 
ders, in 100 lb. kegs, 52.25; bulk in bbls., 
51.90; bulk, less than bbls. and up to 100 
lb., 52 05 ; bladders, bulk or tins, less than 
100 lb., $2 90. 

Plaster Paris — New Brunswick, 51.90 
per bbl. 

Pumice Stone — Powdered, 52.50 per 
cwt. in bbls., and 4 to 5c. per lb. in less 
quantity ; lump, 10c. in small lots, and 8c. 
in bbls. 

Liquid Paints — Pure, 51*20 to 51.30 per 
gal. 

Castor Oil — English, in cases, 9^ to 
ioc. per lb. and 10 to \o l / z z. for single tins. 

Linseed Oil — Raw, 1 to 4 barrels, 84c. ; 
boiled, 87c; 5 to 9 barrels, raw, 81c. ; 



24 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



boiled, 84c, delivered. To Toronto, 

Hamilton, Guelph and London, ic. less. 

Turpentine — Single barrels, 55c; 2 

to 4 barrels, 54c, delivered. Toronto, 

Hamilton and London ic. less. For less 

quantities than barrels, 5c. per gallon extra 

will be added, and for 5 -gallon packages, 

50c, and 10 gallon packages, 80c. will be 

charged. 

GLASS. 

There is a moderate trade at firm, but 
unchanged prices. Arrivals are still rather 
trifling. We quote : Under 26 in., $4.15 
26 to 40 in., $4-45 ; 4* to 50 in., $4.85; 
51 to 60 in., $5.15; 61 to 70 in., 55.50; 
double diamond, under 26 in., $6 ; 26 to 
40 in., $6.65 ; 41 to 50 in., $7.50; 51 to 
60 in., #8.50; 61 to 70 in., $9.50, Toronto, 
Hamilton and London. Terms, 4 months 
or 3 per cent. 30 days. 

OLD MATERIAL. 
Trade is still quiet and on many lines 
prices are only nominal. We quote job- 
bers' prices as follows : Agricultural scrap, 
60c. per cwt. ; machinery cast, 60c. per 
cwt.; stove cast, 40c; No. 1 wrought 
50c. per 100 lb.; new light scrap copper, 
12c. per lb. ; bottoms, lie.; heavy cop- 
per, i2j£c. ; coil wire scrap, i2j£c ; 
light brass, 7c; heavy yellow brass, 10c; 
heavy red brass, io^c. ; scrap lead, 2^c. ; 
zinc, 2c. ; scrap rubber, 6^c. ; good 
country mixed rags, 65 to 75c; clean dry 
bones, 40 to 50c. per 100 lb. 

HIDES. SKINS AND WOOL. 
H ides — The expected decline has arrived , 
and, influenced by the United States mar- 
kets, cowhides are all ^c. lower. We quote 
as follows: Cowhides, No. 1, 7^c. ; No. 2, 
6j£c ; No. 3, 5^c. Steerhides are worth 
ic. more. Cured hides are quoted at Zyi 
to 9c. 

Skins — A moderate demand continues, 
with steady and unchanged prices. We 
quote as follows : No. 1 veal, 8-lb. and 
up, 9c. per lb.; No. 2, 8c; dekins.from 55 
to 60c; culls, 20 to 25c; sheepskins, 90c 
to $1; lambs and pelts, 35c 

Wool — There is a good demand. Comb- 
ing fleece, washed, has declined yi to ic, 
and unwashed is y 2 c. lower. Our quota- 
tions are : Combing fleece, washed, 12 to 
i2^c, and unwashed, 7%, to 8c. 
COAL. 
Egg size in anthracite coal is somewhat 
scarce and others of about that size. There 
is no trouble in obtaining other sizes. 
We quote as follows at international 
bridges : Grate, $4.75 per gross ton ; egg. 
stove and nut, $5 per gross ton with a re- 
bate of ioc off for August shipments. 
PETROLEUM. 
There is a good movement considering 
that the present is always the dull season, 



and prices remain steady and un- 
changed, as follows : Pratt's Astral 
16 to i6^c in bulk (barrels, $1 extra) ; 
American water white, i6j^ to 17c in 
barrels; Photogene, 15^ to 16c; Sarnia 
water white, 15 to I5^cin barrels; Sarnia 
prime white, 14 to I4>£c. in barrels. 



MARKET NOTES. 

Boiler tubes are firmer. 

H. S. Howland, Sons & Co. have taken 
into stock a shipment of Knoll's washing 
machines. These machines have not 
heretofore been sold through the wholesale 
trade, business having been done through 
agents. 

M'CLARY'S ANNUAL PICNIC. 

THE McCLARY MFG. CO., of Lon- 
don, held their employes' annual 
picnic and excursion to Port Stanley 
on Saturday last. The morning of the day 
opened in a threatening manner in London, 
but this did not dampen the eagerness and 
enthusiasm with which the numerous em- 
ployes of this large concern look forward 
to their annual day's outing, en masse. 
While the rain was pouring down in Lon- 
don, telephone communication with Port 
Stanley gave out the gratifying news that 
the weather there was bright and clear, 
showing very little signs of rain. With this 
assurance, over 1,200 people, employes 
and their families, boarded a special train 
for the Port. 

The McClary picnic is the largest held 
from London in the season, and it can be 
taken for granted that among 500 or 600 
able-bodied men and boys a goodly number 
of athletes, comic singers and generally 
funny feliows can be fouud, to say nothing 
of a couple of hundred jolly, laughing girls, 
all of whom gave themselves over to the 
enjoyment of the day, entertaining and 
being entertained. 

Committees had been struck oft over a 
month ago, and their members had taken a 
great deal of care and spent a lot of time in 
planning out a good list of races, contests 
and sports of various kinds, so that every 
one of the 700 employes would have a 
chance of winning a prize under equal con- 
ditions. 

The executive committee was composed 
of Col. W. M. Gartshore, vice-president and 
manager of the company, as president ; 
Jas. Nicholson, superintendent of the tin- 
ware and enamel departments, as chairman; 
John Barned as secretary treasurer, and 
Messrs. Fred. Bailey, Geo. Tapp, John 
Walcott, Wm. Yelland, M. G. Delaney and 
Misses Porter and Graham. On the music 
committee were Messrs. C. Donovan, D. 
Wilson, H. Woodman, S. Milliken, T. 



Couke, C. Manning and Misses Selkirk and 
Ramsay. The committee responsible for 
the sports was made up of Messrs. Lehman, 
R. Spencer, J. Head, J. M. Pirie, J. Bailey, 
E. Wingett and Misses Cotter and Porter. 
To Ihe untiring efforts and hearty coopera- 
tion of these three committees must be 
attributed the success of the picnic and the 
carrying out of many laughable and difficult 
feats. 

One noteworthy feature in connection 
with the annual picnic of this large manu- 
facturing concern is the good-natured 
rivalry which exists among the different 
departments, and also the harmony which 
is so apparent between the business manage- 
ment of the company and their many 
employes, all of which bespeaks the con- 
tentedness of the men, their interest in their 
work and an appreciation of the confidence 
placed in them. 

The programme was started on the 
arrival of the first train at Port Stanley, by 
a half-hour fishing contest, but the finny 
inhabitants of Lake Erie must have been 
forewarned that the "famous" fishermen 
were coming, as they kept very shy of the 
delicacies offered them, resulting in only 
one being landed. This prize was carried 
off by Mr. C. Proctor. The next event 
was a baseball match between the tin and 
iron departments, umpired by Col. W. M. 
Gartshore, resulting in a score of 14 to 8 in 
favor of the tin department. The Colonel, 
while not being versed in modern baseball, 
ruled fairly, and always adhered to his 
decisions, even though approached by a 
grim ironworker in a threatening manner. 

The long list of games was brought to a 
close by a stump speech competition, first 
prize being carried off by Mr. L. Sage. 



DEATH OF R. S. DAVIDSON. 

By the death on Thursday, August 1, of 
Mr. R. S. Davidson, of The Peterboro' 
Hardware Co., Limited, Peterboro' loses one 
of its most esteemed substantial citizens. 
He was a son of the late James Davidson, 
of Smith township, and settled in Peterboro' 
over 40 years ago, being first in the employ 
of Nicholls & Hall. In April 1861 he 
entered into partnership in the hardware 
trade with Mr. R. B. McKee, with whom he 
has been actively associated since. For 
many years Mr. Davidson was chairman of 
the finance committee of the town, and 
rendered good municipal service. He was 
a prominent Mason. 

I 

PERSONAL MENTION. 

Mr. Stanley, president of the Stanley 
Rule and Level Co., New Britain, Conn., 
and Mr. Thompson, of the same firm, were 
in Toronto on Thursday visiting the hard- 
ware trade. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



25 



CANADA AND THE WEST-INDIAN TRADE. 



HARDWARE AND METAL had an 
interesting chat a few days ago with 
Mr. Charles Pickford, who has just 
returned from a six months' sojourn in the 
British West Indies in the interest of Pick- 
ford & Black, owners of the well known 
steamship line that bears their name. 
_^'*Are the people in the British West 
indies taking an increasing interest in the 
question of trade with Canada?" he was 
asked. 

" Yes, they are. They want to do busi- 
ness with us. Our people here -should take 
more interest in the West- Indian trade. 
They should, for instance, keep hammering 
away at the trade all the time, and not 
merely try to sell their products there when 
business is dull at home. Exporters in the 
United States keep steadily after the trade." 

" What about the flour trade ? " 

"The Canadian flour trade with the West 
Indies is growing. During the first six 
months of 1899 our steamers carried 2,737 
bbls. of Canadian flour to the British West 
Indies. Duiing the corresponding period 
in 1900 we took 5.591 bbls., and this year 
16,500 bbls." 

" To what do you ascribe the fact ? " 

" I ascribe it to the fact that the people 
here are taking more interest in the trade, 
and also to the fact that the prejudices 
against Canadian flour are disappearing. 
The idea that Canadian flour will not keep 
in the West Indies is exploded. It will 
keep as good as any flour," declared Mr. 
Pickford, with some vigor. 

Mr. Pickford deprecated the fact that a 
great many buyers in Canada of West- 
Indian products placed their orders through 
New York houses. Another thing that he 
spoke disapprovingly of was the methods 
by which some Canadian firms were 
represented in the West Indies. Some of 
the so called representatives of Canadian 
houses actually did their business through 
New York commission houses. "What 
Canadian houses should do who want to do 
business with the West Indies," said Mr. 
Pickford, "is to send a special traveller and 
do business direct." 

A number of Canadians had visited the 
West Indies during the past summer, but 
he regretted to say that the most of them 
went by way of New York, when they 
could have obtained equally as good service 
«i the boats running out of Halifix. 

In July, 1900, Messrs. Pickford & Black 
doubled the number of their steamers run- 
ning to the West Indies, but notwithstand- 
ing this increase their boats have had full 
cargoes both ways. The service is a fort- 
nightly one to the Winward Islands and 



Demerara. and a monthly one to Bermuda, 
Turk's Island and Jamaica. 

Mr. Pickford, who will make Toronto 
his headquarters till September, when he 
again leaves for the West Indies, will have 
on exhibition at the rooms of the Canadian 
Manufacturers' Association samples of agri 
cultural implements, nails, spikes and 
various kinds of tools such as are used in 
Demerara and other parts of the West 
Indies. The object is to allow manufac- 
turers of these lines in Canada to inspect 
them and excite their interest in the West- 
Indian market. 



EARLY CLOSING IN ST. JOHN. 

ANOTHER large and enthusiastic 
gathering was at the Currie Busi 
ness University last night. The 
committee reported that the movement was 
at last crowned with success far in excess 
of their greatest anticipations. They re- 
ported that the number of groceries closed 
last night exceeded 115; in other words, in 
the short space of two weeks the number 
jumped from 5 to 115. 

W. E. Nobles, of the McAlary Company, 
Limited, said he was in sympathy with the 
movement and happy over the result. He 
stated that it struck the north end like a 
whirlwind, only three stores in north end 
being open when he started for the meet- 
ing. 

T. J. McPherson noted the fact that 
there was a large gathering of dry goods 
clerks present and wished them success in 
their Saturday half-holiday movement. 

"The clergy," said Mr. McPherson, 
" are complaining that the pews are not 
filled on Sunday mornings. If the hours 
were shortened it would be the means ol 
bringing a large number to church where 
they would be glad to be. He favored the 
agitation of workmen being paid earlier in 
the week and thought it would be a ^tep 
towards temperance as a number of the 
workingmen are more inclined to carouse 
on Saturday knowing that they had Sunday 
as a day free from work. He felt positive 
that the grocers' success was assured. 

James Williams stated that in the city 
proper only three small shops on City Road 
were open, and, at his suggestion, it was 
resolved to keep up the agitation through 
the press. The grocers then gave way to 
the dry goods clerks. 

There was a large number of dry goods' 
clerks present. It was decided by them to 
appeal to the ladies, also to the hardware 
clerks and their wives. It was the feeling 
of the meeting that the proprietors might be 
induced to make a trial of closing on Satur 
day afternoons for the month of August 
and a plan is expected to be suggested at 
a meeting to be called next week, of which 
due notice will be given through the papers. 
—Telegraph, St. John, N.B., July 26. 



CONDENSED OR "WANT" 
ADVERTISEMENTS. 

Advertisements under this heading, 2c. a word 
each insertion ; cash in advance. Letters, figures, 
and abbreviations each count as one word in estimat- 
(ng cost. 

SITUATION VACANT. 

AN ASSISTANT IS WANTED IN THE ADVER- 
tising Department of Hardware and Metal, 
Toronto. Preference will be given to a bright young man, 
full of ideas, who has had a successful experience in a 
general hardware store. Apply, with references, experience 
and salary expected, to Hardware and Metal, 
Toronto. (31) 



CHAMPION FIRE and 
BURGLAR-PROOF . . 



SAFES 



ESTABLISHED HERE SIXTEEN YEARS. 

We sell direct to 
the user, and save 
all commissions. 

SrXTEEN SIZES 
IN STOCK. 

Our small Safe is 
the best, low-priced 
safe in the marker. 

GET PRICES, ETC. 




BEFORE BUYING. 



S. S. KIMBALL, 

577 Craig Street, - Montreal 



"KEY CABINET 

pleased with it. 



to hand and we are 
JOHN MILLEN & SON, 

Montreal. 



Cabinets for all kinds of goods fitted with 

BENNETT'S PATENT SHELF BOX 



M idi to Order. 




For particulars apply to the patentee 
and manufacturer. 

J. S. BENNETT, 20 Sheridan Ave., TORONTO 



AXE HANDLES 

Very heavy stocks 

Thoroughly seasoned goods 

we make a Can ship promptly and 

specialty of . . . supply the very best 

" Hand Shaved " 

Octagon 

Axe Handles 5 



Made by 
dians 



being the largest dealers in Canada in this line 

Can give exceptional value. 

Have 5,000 dozen of these handles 

on hand ready for polishing. 

Write for prices. 



Eastern Agtnt — W. B. Murdock, Amherst, N.S. 
Western Agent — Jno. Burns, Jr.. Vancouver, B.C. 
Montre.il Agent — Alexander Gibb, 22 St. John St. 

W. C. CRAWFORD 

Tilbury, Ont. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HEATING 



AND 



PLUMBING 



ADVICE TO USERS OF GASOLINE. 

A DETROIT manufacturing firm has 
recently prepared an article in 
regard to the use of gasoline from 
which we take the following : 

" It is impossible to make a gasoline fire- 
pot or torch that will do first-class work for 
years without any attention. Even a 
wheelbarrow needs oiling occasionally, or 
you will hear from it. There is no mystery 
about building gasoline fires ; they all work 
on the same principle, although it may be 
applied a little differently. 

" The tanks for all gasoline fire-pots or 
torches are made to hold the gasoline, and 
must be constructed so that they will hold 
an air pressure, as air is used to force the 
gasoline up to the burner. If the tank leaks 
air the fire will not work well and it will be 
necessary to pump it up often. The tanks 
are usually supplied with an opening for 
filling ; some kind of pump or bulb for 
putting in the air pressure, and a supply 
pipe that carries gasoline from the bottom 
of the tank to the burner. When the fire- 
pot or torch is right side up, the air pressure 
forces the gasoline up this supply pipe to 
feed the burner. If the air pressure escapes, 
the gasoline will gradually fall back out of the 
pipe and the fire will go out. Remember 
that with nearly all burners the heavier the 
air pressure is the better the fire will be. 

" Now about the burner. All gasoline 
burners depend upon heat to make the gas 
they burn. It is, therefore, necessary to 
heat the burner first when starting a fire. 
This is usually done by burning gasoline in 
the drip cup provided for that purpose. The 
burner on any gasoline fire gets dirty from 
sediment formed by heating gasoline, and 
if this sediment is rot removed the veins of 
the burner gradually fill up and finally the 
burner won't work. Nearly all burners are 
fitted with cleanout plugs, so that they may 
be easily cleaned. 

"Examine your fire pot or torch care- 
fully ; try to understand how it is made and 
the object in having everything just as it is; 
don't be afraid of it. 

" If your fire pot or torch doesn't work, 
first see that the tank is nearly full of 
gasoline, and then screw the filler-plug 
tight. If the washer is old or worn, replace 
with new, made of leather (never use 
rubber), or, if leather is not handy, take a 
piece of cotton string and soap it, using the 
soap as you would wax in waxing a thread. 



Then wind the string to the right, so that 
when the plug is screwed to place it will 
tighten the string. See that there is no 
leak around the pump-collar. If this 
washer is old, renew as described above. 
Now see that the pump works right. All 
air pumps need oiling often, as they heat in 
use, and this dries the cup leathers. A 
dry cup - leather means a poor pump ; 
therefore, oil the pump often. A few drops 
at a time and ofcen will make a pump last 
many years. After pumping in a good 
heavy pressure of air, and before trying to 
light the fire, turn it upside down. This 
brings the gasoline in the top part of the 
tank, and should there be a leak you will 
soon find it. If it leaks, repair it. A leaky 
tank means a poor fire. If the tank is 
tight, turn the fire right side up, and, if the 
burner is mounted on a swivel, see that it is 
in position, so that the gasoline will fill the 
drip- cup and also stand in the iron plate 
under the flat part of the burner. If the 
burner is rigid, it will be in the right shape. 

"To fill the drip-cup open the needle 
point slightly, and when full close the 
needle point. Light with match and let it 
burn out ; then open needle a little and 
light again, letting it burn low until 
the burner is thoroughly hot. Then 
you should have a good flame that 
will do good work. If the burner 
smokes or does not give a blast when the 
tank is tight and the air pressure good, it 
will indicate that the burner is dirty and 
needs cleaning. To do this, take the burner 
and swivel off the fire-pot and take out all 
clean out plugs. (If they stick tap them 
lightly with a hammer and they will unscrew 
easily.) After forcing out all dirt with a 
fine wire, wash the burner in gasoline, soap 
the plugs and screw them to place. Don't 
take the swivel apart. Remove the wire 
strainer cloth from little end of swivel (the 
best way to do this is with a small drill), 
and replace it with new, made of No. 60 
strainer cloth, rolled up tight and forced 
into the hole. This keeps out lint and dirt, 
saves cleaning burner as often as would be 
necessary if it were not used, and it also 
helps vaporize the gasoline. 

" Remember the gasoline tank must be 
air tight ; the filler plug and pump must be 
screwed down so air does not escape ; the 
pump must be oiled often and a good pres- 
sure of air put in the tank ; the burner 
must be kept clean. Use leather or cotton 
string for washers. Don't use rubber ; 



gasoline dissolves it. Use 74 per cent, 
stove gasoline, and be sure that the measures 
or cans in which it is handled are used for 
nothing else. A teaspoonful of kerosene, 
or any oil or paint, would ruin a gallon <5 
gasoline, as it would quickly clog burners." 



THE PROVINCIAL CONSTITUTION. 

A sub-committee of the National Plumb- 
ers' Association met on Friday night to 
revise the constitution of the Provincial 
associations and to prepare the report of the 
convention for printing. The committee is 
composed of Messrs. W. H. Meredith, J. H. 
Wilson and Wm. Mansell. 



PLUMBING EXAMINATIONS 

The plumbing board recently constituted 
in Montreal is about to begin the examina- 
tion of plumbers. The members of the 
board are Sanitary Engineer Dore, Building 
Inspector Chausse and J. W. Hughes, a 
practical plumber. 



PLUMBING AND HEATING 
CONTRACTS. 

The James Smart Manufacturing Co., 
Brockville, Ont., have recently secured 
contracts for warming and ventilating the 
following buildings, using their celebrated 
' ' Kelsey ' ' warm air generators for the 
purpose : Residence of Dr. Caldwell, Peter - 
boro', Ont.; residence of Miss J. J. Kingan, 
Peterboro', Ont.; new hotel being erected 
at Rapid City, Man.; public school build- 
ing, Arthur, Ont. ; a block of three stores at 
Gore Bay ; Bonar Presbyterian Church, 
Toronto; Norfolk Street Methodist Church, 
Guelph. 

Elliott Brothers, Kingston, have been 
awarded the contract for the plumbing work 
in connection with the new insane asylum 
for women. 



SOME BUILDING NOTES. 

A new church will shortly be erected in 
Digby, N.S. 

A new court house has just been built in 
Bathurst, N.B. 

A new sawmill is in construction at St. 
Justin, Que. 

A Roman Catholic church is building in 
London, Ont. 

A Presbyterian church is being built at 
Grand Valley, Ont. 

A new Roman Catholic hospital is being 
erected at Glace Bay, N.S. It will be 160 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



11 



ADVERTISING inWESTERN CANADA 

will be Carefully Efficiently, and Promptly 
attended to, by 

The Roberts Advertising Agency, 

WINNIPEG CANADA. 



1879 



ESTABLISHED 



1879 



Essex Handle and Wood 
Turning Works 

j«a Late of Essex, now LEAMINGTON, ONT. 

Makers of Axe, Fork, Rake, Hoe, Sledge, Broom, 
Hammer and all kinds of Handles. Neck Yokes, 
Singletrees and Doubletrees, Bench Saws, Exercise 
Clubs, Baseball Bats, etc., etc. Do you sell any 
Shaved Pattern and Octagon Axe Handles? The 
largest and best trade in Canada does, because they 
give best satisfaction. All stock air-dried, not 
kiln-dried. If you are going to be in it, place your 
order with 

GARDNER BROS. & CO. 



LOW TANK 
WATER CLOSET 
COMBINATIONS 
THE MOST PER- 
FECT ON THE 
MARKEr 
NOISELESS IN 
ACTION 
BEAUTIFUL 
DESIGNS, 

Write for Cataiogue. 

The James Morrison 
I Brass Mfg. Co. 

Limited 
TORONTO, ONT, 




PAINT THE 
BARN 
$1.00 A 
GALLON. 



Thousands of barns are unpainted, thousands 
of bridges, fences, outhouses. Unpainted be- 
cause farmers cannot afford or won't afford to 
pay the price of our high-grade house paints. 
But they don't need high-grade house paints 
for this work. There is an immense trade 
awaiting merchants who will suggest to farmers 
to us 





AMSAYS 



OUTSIDE PAINTS 



guaranteed nothing better in the world for the 
farmers' barns. Adds a double term of years 
to the barn. Keeps the sun away from the 
wood, protects the roof from rains, and you sell 
it for a dollar, reap a handsome profit and please 
your customer. That's the heart of business — 
don't you think so ? 



A. Ramsay & Son 



PAINTMAKERS, 



Est'd 1842. 



MONTREAL. 



ONTARIO SILVER GO, 



Limited, 



NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA 

Manufacturers of 

Ask for our Catalogue and Quotations. 



FLATWARE, CUTLERY and 
ELECTRO PLATE. . . 



ONTARIO 

NUTWORK 
PARIS 
ONT. 



Ontario Nut Works, Paris 

BROWN & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

All sizes of Hot Pressed 
Nuts, Square and Hexagon. 



The Renewable Disc t Fairbanks Valve 

>A^^VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVtVVVVVV\^^VMA^VVVV^^ AM^VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVi^\VVVVVVVVVVVVVVS 



LOOKS LIKE THIS 




It consists of a "VULCANIZED" asbestos ring perma 
nently fixed in a metal holder. The highly elastic " Vulcabes- 
ton" saves the seat of the valve from injury by closing around 
any particle of scale which may be caught between the seat and 
the Disc while the valve is being shut. 

The metal supports it, and is the means of its attachment 
to the spindle 

The whole Disc is interchangeable and renewable at a 
slight cost, and with less work than any valve made. 

For Prices and Catalogue : 



THE FAIRBANKS COMPANY 

Montreal. 



28 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



feet long. 50 feet wide and 56 feet high ; 
lighted by electricity and heated by steam. 

Kingston is likely to have a new theatre 
shortly. 

A Roman Catholic church will soon be 
built at Quyon, Que. 

A Lutheran church is being erected in 
Middle la Have, N.S. 

St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, B.C., is 
to be enlarged to over twice its present size. 

A church is being built in Winnipeg by 
theSwedish Lutherans, to cost about$7,oco 
It will be 20 x 38 ft., and will seat 500 
persons. 

There is a building boom on in Dundas. 
Ont. James Watson, Harry Argold and 
Arthur Mason are each building a dwelling; 
and Peter Westphall and Joseph Reid are 
building two houses each. 

In Fredericton, N.B , houses are being 
built for Dr. Barbom and O. S. Crocket ; 
and, it is understood, that others will shortly 
be commenced for Geo. F. Wilkes and 
Judge Gregory. 

The Modern Flat Building Co. has been 
incorporated in Toronto, and will build their 
first apartment house there very shortly. It 
will be six storeys high, and will have eight 
suites of rooms on each flat. Each suite 
will comprise a drawing-room, three bed- 
rooms, kitchen, pantries and closet, and a 
first-class lavatory. The building will be 
steam heated. 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED. 

BUILDING permits have been issued in 
Toronto for a $ 1,200 frame dwelling 
on St. Helen's avenue for Mrs. 
Tracey ; a two-storey brick dwelling on 
Scarth road for Thos. Thompson, to cost 
$4,500 ; a pair of semi detached dwellings 
on Wilton avenue for the Toronto General 
Hospital, to cost $2, coo ; a $5,000 addition 
to the offices on King street of the North 
American L ; fe Insurance Co.; a $2,500 
dwelling on Wright avenue for Wm. May- 
wood ; a pair of semi-detached houses on 
Withrow avenue for James Dale, to cost 
$3,000 ; a pair of semi-detached dwellings 
on Hallam street for Saunders & Crottie, to 
cost $3 000 ; a twostoiey house on Albany 
avenue for W. F. Langlois, to cost $2,000 ; 
a pair of dwellings on Hallam street for 
John Dibbs, to cost $1,400, and for a 
$6,ooo-pair of semi-detached dwellings on 
Cawthra Square for Thomas Bryce. 

VANCOUVER. 

Addition to Mount Pleasant Methodist 
church, $1,000 ; C. Dougherty, frame store, 
Front street, Mount Pleasant, $300 ; W. T. 
- Farrell, three frame houses, corner Davie 
and two frame dwellings, Comox street, 
$1,600 each ; Geo. Trorey, two frame 



houses, Barclay, $800 each ; Wm. Bailey, 
frame dwelling, Burnaby street, $4,000 ; 
A. C. Young, frame dwelling, Cordova 
street, east, $800 ; C. F. Perry, frame 
dwelling, corner Bridge street and Sixth 
avenue, Fairview, $850 ; T. C. Hillbank, 
frame dwelling, Second avenue, Fairview, 
$800 ; E. Choate, frame dwelling, corner 
Eighth and Willow street, $900 ; C. V. 
Knowdell, frame dwelling, Haro street, 
$1,200 ; J. G. Johnstone, frame dwelling, 
Pendrill street, $1,400 ; B. Davidson, frame 
dwelling, corner Georgia and Broughton 
streets, $1,800 ; J. Coleman, frame dwel- 
ling, Davie street, $1,700. 

OTTAWA. 

J. F. Maunders, lot 28, Fourth avenue, 
frame dwelling, $1,800 ; Ex-Aid. S. J. 
Davis, lots 44 and 45, Jane street, brick 
veneered double tenement, $2,500 ; Sir 
Sandford Fleming, lots 31 and 32 Daly 
avenue, stone addition to residence, $4 000. 



THE FAMOUS STYRIAN. 

AWAY in Styria, in the Southern 
Alpine region of Austria, rises the 
famous Erzberg or Ore Mountain, 
one of the most interesting geological 
features of the world. This mountain, 
which reaches the height of 4.800 feet above 
the sea level and nearly 3,000 feet above 
the little town of Eisenerz nestling at its feet, 
presents a most striking appearance and 
consists entirely of Spathic iron ore. 

From the earliest antiquity this huge store 
of iron ore has served to provide man's most 
useful metal. It was quarried by the 
original inhabitants of the country, the 
Celts, and iron was smelted in a crude 
fashion in the surrounding valleys. Later 
on in history, when the Romans took posses- 
sion of the country which formed part of 
their Province " Noricum," they soon 
found out the great value of this treasure of 
iron ore so near at hand, and began to pro- 
duce therefrom the famous " Noric Steel " 
which furnished their conquering legions 
with their swords, spears and shields. 

Ever since those remote times the work of 
quarrying from the mountains has been 
going on, and it still offers inexhaustible 
treasures. Unfortunately a fire that occurred 
in Eisenerz in 18 19 destroyed many valu- 
able documents, carrying back the history 
of the manufacture to A.D. 712, which, 
early as it may seem, is still late in the 
history of the " Erzberg." 

The ore from this Erzberg mountain 
forms the basis of the famous Styrian tool 
steel. In early times, the manufacturing 
process was carried on by a number of 
ironmasters dotted all over the adjacent 
valleys, which, later, were combined into a 
kind of cooperative society andj then into 



the Iron, Steel and Mining Society of the 
Austrian Alps. It was from this last named 
concern that the famous tool steel works at 
Kapfenberg passed into the hands of 
Bohler Bros. & Co., Sheffield, England, 
who, under the brand of "Styrian" steel, 
may justly lay claim to having revived the 
ancient fame cf the old Noric steel. This 
Styrian steel is not only made in the various 
grades of crucible cast steel, but the manu- 
facturers have the reputation of making 'he 
finest self hardening steel produced. 

Users of steel in Canada will be all the 
more interested in Styrian steel from the 
fact that Rice Lewis & Son, Limited, of 
Toronto, are placing it on this market, 
having obtained, after many months of 
negotiations, the sole agency for the Domin- 
ion. Although for the first time introduced 
to the Canadian trade, the reputation of the 
steel is so well known among many con- 
sumers of steel in this country that large 
orders have already been booked for it by 
the firm's travellers. 

It might be noted that Bohler Bros. & 
Co. melt the pig in their blast furnaces at 
Vordernberg, refine the raw material at 
numerous charcoal raw steel fineries, and 
eventually cast the steel in Kapfenberg 
and their various branch works in Europe, 
chief of which are at Sheffield in England 
and Ratibor in Silesia. 



"SUNSHINE" FURNACE PATTERNS 
SOLD. 

Last week, The McClary Mfg. Co., of 
London, Ont., sold duplicate iron patterns 
of the " Sunshine" furnace to The Summit 
Foundry Co., of Geneva, N.Y., for territory 
east of the Mississippi, and are now nego- 
tiating with two large American concerns 
for the sale of the patterns for territory west 
of the Mississippi. 

Mr. Reid, of The Summit Foundry Co., 
when examining the "Sunshine" in Lon- 
don, declared that it was built on the most 
commonsense lines of any furnace he ever 
saw, which speaks volumes for Canadian 
talent and the " Sunshine" furnace. 

The "Sunshine" is one of the most 
popular furnaces in Canada, and evidently 
our friends across the border appreciate a 
good article when they see it. 



Incorporated 
1851. 



WESTERN 

H ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Fire and Marine 

Capital, subscribed $2,000,000.00 
Capital - - - l,000,00;iO0 
Assets, over - - 2,340,000.00 
Annual Income - 2,290,000.00 

Head Office: TORONTO. ONT. 



Hon. Geo. A. Cox, President. J.J. Kenny, Vice-Presiden 
C. C. Foster, Secretary. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



29 



MANITOBA MARKETS. 

Winnipeg, July 29, 1901. 

HARDWARE AND PAINTS. OILS 
AND GLASS. 

A FAIRLY active trade has been 
maintained throughout the week 
on a steady market, not a single 
change in price being reported. The 
scarcity of barb wire continues Paints 
aj£d oils hardly show the activity that might 
be expected ; still, a good volume of busi- 
ness has been done. 

Binder twine is a live subject now. 
Nearly all local dealers have shipped out 
their entire stocks, and the question is being 
mooted as to whether there is enough to go 
around. Sisal continues firm at 9c. and 
manila at 12 j s c. 

Quotations for the week are as follows : 

Barhed wire, 100 lb S3 45 

Plain twist 3 45 

Staples 3 95 

Oiled annealed wire 10 3 95 

11 4 00 

12 4 05 

13 4 20 

14 4 35 

15 i 45 
Wire nails, 30 to 60 dy, keg 3 5° 

16 and 20 3 60 

10 3 60 

8 3 70 

6 3 75 

4 3 9° 

3 4 15 

Cut nails, 30 to 60 dy 3 10 

20 to 40 3 15 

" 10 to 16 3 20 

8 325 

6 3 3° 

4 3 4° 

3 3 75 

Horsenails, 45 percent, discount. 

Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No 1 4 65 

No. 2 and larger 4 4° 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 4 9° 

No. 2 and larger 4 4° 

Steel, No. o to No. 1 4 95 

No. 2 and larger 4 70 

tint iron, $2.60 basis. 
Swedish iron, $5. co-basis. 

Sleigh shoe steel 3 25 

Spring steel 3 25 

Machinery steel 3 75 

Tool steel, Black Diamond, 100 lb 8 50 

Jessop 13 00 

Sheet iron, black, 10 to 20 gauge, 100 lb. 3 50 

20 to 26 gauge 3 75 

28 gauge 4 00 

Galvanized American, 16 gauge. . . 2 54 

18 to 22 gauge 4 50 

24 gauge 4 75 

26 gauge 5 00 

28gauge 5 25 

Genuine Russian, lb 12 

Imitation " " 8 

Tinned, 24 gauge, 100 lb 7 75 

26 gauge 8 00 

28 gauge 8 50 

Tinplate, IC charcoal, 20 x 28, box 10 75 

IX 12 75 

" 1XX 14 75 

Ingot tin 33 

Canadaplate, 18 x 21 and 18 x 24 3 25 

Sheet zinc, cask lots, 100 lb 7 co 

Broken lots 7 50 

Pig lead, 100 lb 6 00 

Wrought pipe, black up to 2 inch 50 an 10 p.c. 

Over 2 inch 50 p.c. 

KerpS, sisal, 7-16 and larger $11 00 

}i 1 1 50 

" }i and 5-16 1200 

Manila, 7-16 and larger 14 00 

H 14 5° 

" H and 5-16 1500 

Solder 20 

Cotton Rope, all sizes, lb 17 

Axes, chopping $ 7 50 to 12 00 

" double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 



Screws, flat head, iron, bright 87 !4 

Round" " 82^ 

Flat " brass 80 

Round " " 75 

Coach 57 l A p.c. 

Bolts, carriage 55 p.c. 

Machine 55 p.c. 

Tire 60 p.c 

Sleigh shoe 65 p.c. 

Plough 40 p c. 

Rivets, iron 50 p.c. 

Copper, No. 8 35 

Spades and shovels 40 p.c. 

Harvest tools 50, and 10 p.c. 

Axe handles, turned, s. g. hickory, doz.. $2 50 

No. 1 1 50 

No. 2 1 25 

Octagon extra 175 

No. 1 1 25 

Files common 70, and 10 p.c. 

Diamond 60 

Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 50 p.c. 

Dominion, OF., pistol 30 p.c. 

military 15 p.c. 

American R.F 30 p.c. 

C. F. pistol 5p.c. 

C.F. military 10 p.c. advance. 

Loaded shells : 

Eley's soft, 12 gauge black 16 50 

chilled, 12 guage 18 00 

soft, 10 guage 21 00 

chilled, 10 guage 23 00 

Shot, Ordinary, per 100 lb 6 25 

Chilled 6 75 

Powder, F.F., keg 4 75 

F.F.G 5 00 

Tinware, pressed, retinned 75 and 2 % p.c. 

" plain 70 and 15 p.c. 

Graniteware, according to quality 50 p.c. 



PETROLEUM. 



Water white American 
Prime white American. . 
Water white Canadian . . 
Prime white Canadian. 



25)ic. 
24c. 
22c. 
21c. 



PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS 



Turpentine, pure, in barrels $ 61 

Less than barrel lots 66 

Linseed oil , raw 92 

Boiled 95 

Lubricating oils, Eldorado castor 25 'a 

Eldorado engine 24 J4 

Atlantic red 27^ 

Renown engine 41 

Black oil 23 % to 25 

Cylinder oil (according to grade) . . 55 to 74 

Harness oil 61 

Neatsfoot oil $ 1 00 

Steam refined oil 85 

Sperm oil 1 50 

Castor oil per lb. 11 l A 

Glass, single glass, first break, 16 to 25 

united inches 2 25 

26 to 40 per 50 ft. 2 50 

41 to 50 " 100 ft. 5 50 

51 to 60 " " " 600 

61 to 70 per 100-ft. boxes 6 50 

Putty, in bladders, barrel lots per lb. 2J4 

kegs " 2K 

White lead, pure per cwt. 7 00 

No 1 6 75 

Prepared paints, pure liquid colors, ac- 
cording to shade and color, per gal. $1.30 to J1.90 

NOTES. 

W. Bristow has purchased the hardware 

business formerly carried on by C. C t Baker 

& Co., Neepawa. 



HAD A GOOD HOLIDAY. 

Messrs. Geo. U. Desroches, E. Lusignan 
and Lucien Roy, of The Canada Hardwaie 
Co., Montreal, have just returned from a 10 
days' fishing and huniing excursion. They 
encamped at Ile-aux-Noix, on the banks of 
the Richelieu, and report having had a first- 
class holiday. 



V. E. Paradis has been appointed pro- 
visional guardian of Dionne & Co., general 
merchants, etc., St. Moise, Que. 



DIAMOND 
GRAPHITE 
PAINT 



The very best covering and ANTI-RUST 
Paint for all Metallic structures. 



THE 



CANADA 

PAINT 

COMPANY 



LIMITED 

MONTREAL 



GRAPHITE 



For MACHINES, 
BRIDGES and 
GIRDERS. 

Resists 
Corrosion 

and gives a beautiful finish. The IDEAL 

Paint for economy and durability. 

Correspondence invited. 

THE 

CANADA 

PAINT 

COMPANY 

LIMITED 

TORONTO 



30 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HINTS FOR MEN WHO ADVERTISE. 



M I 



ADVERTISING FOR MAIL-ORDER BUSINESS 

DOING business through the mails is 
reaching proportions in these days 
that makes valuable any sugges- 
tion as to better methods of management, 
remarks Business. It is not alone the 
houses that are known distinctively as 
" mail-order houses," but almost every 
merchant is striving in this age to reach 
beyond his local surroundings, and to a 
large number the mailorder system proves 
the open door. 

Advertising must necessarily play an im- 
portant part in the expansion of mail-order 
business in whatever line. For this reason 
the following from a contemporary will 
prove of interest to the many concerned: 

The element of persistency is the one es- 
sential to ultimate success in the mail-order 
business. There is little or no use in the 
new man in this field of action reaching 
down into his pocket and saying to him- 
self : " Here's so much money ; I will in- 
vest it in space to advertise my wares. All 
the results I obtain through the instrumen- 
tality of this ad. I will turn back into more 
advertising and gradually build up a busi- 
ness." A business cannot be established on 
this basis for the simple reason that one 
advertisement, even though it may be in- 
serted in the strongest medium in the United 
States, will not bring in enough returns the 
first time to give sufficient capital to con- 
tinue advertising upon a respectable basis. 
The reason for this is plain. Not one in one 
thousand of the readers of your ad. will in- 
vestigate. It is simply read and left go 
over. In the next issue it is missing and 
the man you are after never thinks of it 
more, simply because the one reading has 
not fixed it upon his mind. You can safely 
count upon a large percentage of your 
money invested as lost on your first effort. 

Start in, however, to make a success of 
the mail-order business by being prepared 
to spend a sum calculated to give you a 
lasting publicity, Make your advertise- 
ments pull by reason of the frequency with 
which they appear. Give your prospective 
customer some reasons for believing that 
you are a permanent fixture in the mail- 
order business by keeping before him per- 
sistently. Make him believe that you are 
doing a big business by reason of the 
stability of your advertisements ; ihen if the 
articles you are selling have real merit and 
deserve public confidence, rest assured that 
you will have your returns a hundred fold 
increased. 



A man (one of the "get rich quickly" 
stamp) once said : "I don't see how the 
numberless people advertising in the big 
mail-order monthlies ever stand the pace. 
I am sure they don't get returns for the 
amount they invest. I speak from a positive 
knowledge of facts, because I have tried the 
experiment." 

" How much did you put up to prove this 
business a failure ? " queried a friend. 

••Well," he answered, "I blew #20 in 
on a so called successful mail-order publica- 
tion and I didn't get more than half my 
money back." 

There is a fellow who would drill a quar- 
ter-inch hole in the rock of Gibraltar and 
try to blow the whole thing up with two 
ounces of gunpowder, and he would get 
mad if he were to be hit in the eye with a 
small piece of stone, and upon opening the 
other eye find the rest of the rock still 
standing. 

The mail-order business, like every other 
legitimate one, requires a certain amount of 
cash capital back of it, coupled with an 
ordinary amount of brain power and a good 
medium. Given these three elements and 
success is sure. 

ADVERTISING AND SUCCESS. 

Any good store will stand good advertis- 
ing, no matter whether the store sells dry 
goods or liquors or cigars or drugs. No 
store can succeed without advertising of 
some kind. Do not misunderstand me. 
Advertising isn't necessarily printed in the 
paper. It isn't necessarily the distribution 
of circulars or the painting of signs or the 
posting of bills. The advertising may be 
done in the store itself, and this is the best 
of all advertising. If this kind of adver- 
tising isn't done all the other advertising is 
discounted. Advertising may be gained 
by the proprietor's large circle of acquaint- 
ances. When two men are introduced, the 
chances are that each will find out the busi- 
ness of the other before they part. If they 
do not, the friend who introduced them 
will be asked what business each is in. 
That is one of the first things a man wants 
to know about another. It seems easier to 
take a man's measure when you know what 
business he is in. You can classify him 
better. 

I want to say again that no business can 
succeed without advertising of some sort, 
and the better the advertising the greater 
the success. — Chas. A. Bates. 

MEASLES IN ADVERTISING. 

The advertiser's individuality is not often 
expressed in the design brought in by the 
artist who has ! ' had an idea ' ' and offers to 



sell it for so much, says J. A. Richards in 
Profitable Advertising. 

Designs are many these days. There's 
an epidemic of them. They are not fatal, 
but a man with the measles isn't worth 
much for business. 

And an advertisement which is all broken 
out with an artistic design isn't very valu- 
able for business purposes, either. 

And when a lot of these sick-looking 
advertisements are grouped together in a 
magazine, why, the entire mass is specklr jg 
spotted, ineffective. 

But the advertiser isn't so much to blame 
for this epidemic as the artists and writers 
themselves, who have the disease chroni- 
cally, and who run around and spread it 
among the unsuspecting. 

The average advertiser is so constantly 
and almost abnormally looking for some- 
thing to attract that when a man with a 
design comes along he doesn't see the 
measliness of it, and before he knows it 
he's caught the disease. 

And this is the way it comes about. The 
design is attractive as it comes from the 
artist's hand. 

It's more attractive when reproduced in 
quarter-page magazine size, as it stands all 
alone, an artist's proof, with a lot of white 
space all about it. 

The next time you see it you know it's a 
case of measles ward of the magazine. 

That is to say, there are scores more of 
such designs all around it, and instead of 
being good advertising it's good measles, 
that is, it's out all right. 

You see, it isn't the single case of 
measles that disturbs the peace of the com- 
munity, but the epidemic. 

So it isn't the single design that offends 
in the advertising world ; it's the multipli- 
city of such things which renders flat and 
ineffective the effort of the many. 

We have been accustomed to hear of the 
great variety of talent displayed in the ad- 
vertising section of the magazines, and it is 
true enough. 

And yet, these epidemics do sweep over 
the community and paralyze for a time the 
effectiveness of the expenditure. 

Perhaps there's nothing to be done but 
let the epidemic run its course, and perhaps, 
if it isn't measles, it's whooping cough or 
some other malady which simultaneously 
attacks the advertising community. 

We certainly cannot quarantine the ad- 
vertiser so afflicted. What then ? 

In the first place, if we were victims let's 
look at ourselves in the glass when the 
design disease is on us, and see how like 
the mischief and how unlike ourselves we 
look. 

And then — 

Well, we'll get over it. 

If we haven't had the prevailing malady 
and don't want it, how shall we protect 
ourselves ? 

Why let's quarantine ourselves. 

Let's not be affected by the preva- : y <j 
craze for certain styles of advertising copy, 
but think deeply and clearly. 

Write simply and concisely. 

Illustrate appropriately. 

And so we shall advertise in a hea'thy 
manner. 

And yet, after all, it is'nt every design 
that is measly. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE 



PORTLAND 
CEMENTS 

Best German, Belgian and 
English Brands. 

Fire Bricks, Fire Clay, 

JJtue Linings, 

brain Pipes, 

Calcined Plaster, 

Granite Hard Wall Plaster, 

Wheelbarrows, 

Mortar Stains. 

A full stock of Builders* and Contractors' 
Supplies. Write for Quotations. 



W. HcNally & Co., 

MONTREAL. 



DAVID PHILIP 

MANUFACTURERS' AGENT 

362H Main St., - WINNIPEG. 

Correspondence invited from manufacturers of Staple or 
Heavy Hardware, Iron or Steel Bolts and Nuts, etc., 
ei'her by carrying slock in Winnipeg or by selling direct 
from factory. 

GOOD REFERENCES. 




METAL 



31 



ire Guards 



Store Fronts 

Factory and Mill Windows 

Basement Windows 



THE B. GREENING WIRE CO., limited 

HAMILTON, ONT., AND MONTREAL, QUE. 




The New 
Century Drum. 

NEWEST, neatest and best 
heating drum on the market. 
Can be used on back of stove, in 
hall, or in an upper room. Owing 
to Us construction, the heat is 
forced all around next lo outer 
cylinder, between two cylinders, 
making it a very powerful heater 
— a saving of about one-quarter 
to one-half of fuel— occupying a 
space ot only about 11x27 inches, 
still having a radiating surface of 
about 1,000 square inches. Both 
enc/s being oval and being made 
out of po ished steel, leady to set 
up, it makes a very handsome ap- 
pearance, suitable for any draw- 
ing-room. Price* right to Jobbers 
and Dealers. Write the manu- 
facturers, 



colli jvs Aire, co., 



34 Adelaide Street West 



TORONTO 



The Robin Hood 
Powder Company 

If you want the best Trap or Game load in 
the world, buy "Robin Hood Smokeless," 
in " Robin Hood " Shells. It is quick, safe, 
and reliable. Try it for pattern and pene- 
tration from forty to seventy yards against 
any powder on the market. We make the 
powder, we make the shells, and we load 
them. Write for our booklet, " Powder 
Facts." 

The Robin Hood Powder 
Company 

SWANTON, VT. 



"NOT IN THE TRUST OR MEMBERS OF ANY SILVERWARE ASSOCIATION OR COMBINE.' 
THE TORONTO SILVER PLATE CO., Limited, Silversmiths and Manufactures of .fikctro S 









1 ■'-ir wm * 








BEznnmnmn 






w 



No. 509 5-Piece E. P. Tea Set. Special net price quoted on application. 
Factories and Salesrooms, King St. West, Toronto, Canada. E. G. Gooderham, Managing-Director. 



32 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



SHORT METHODS IN FIGURES. 



BY C. G. AMBLER. 



SI. 10 ; third, 81.26 ; fourth, SI. 14 
$8. hi ; remainder, sj 2. 17. 

SURFACE MEASURE. 



total. 



SO many articles of hardware are sold 
at list and discount that it is desir- 
able to use short methods as much 
as possible in reckoning the net cost and 
sell inn price. 

DISCOUNTS. 

Every hardwareman knows that the net 
figures are found quicker l>\ multiplying 
the list by the net cost per cent, than In 
subtracting the amount discounted from 

the list. For example, if we have (ill and 
III per cent., instead of finding till per 
cent, of the list and subtracting that from 
the list, then deducting In per cent, of the 
remainder, we won Id say that a discount of 
(ill per cent, leaves 111 per cent, of the list, 
and 10 per cent, more discount reduces it 
to 3(5 per cent., which is the net cost per 
cent. 

Thus, if we have files listed at $13.50 per 
dozen, the net price at the above discounl 
will be :{() per cent, of 813.50, or $4.86. 
Another kind, at $14.75 list, would net, 
$5.31. This method is especially helpful in 
case it is necessary to reckon the prices of 
a number of articles at the same discount, 
but listed differently, as when making 
price lists or marking goods from the in 
voice; It is of still greater convenience as 
a preliminary step in getting the net price 
of a single article. 

DETERMINING THE NET OF A SINGLE 
ARTICLE. 

The net price of a single article listed by 

the dozen may lie found by multiplying the 
list by one-twelfth of the cost per cent, foi 
a do/i>n. If it is required to know the nel 
price of one file at $13.50 per do/en. less (ill 
and HI, having found that the net cost pel 
dozen is 36 per cent, of the list, it follows 
that one will he oliT^twehth as much, or 3 
per cent, of the list, which is 1J cent-. 
takine- the nearest, whole number,* as Bfta 
t oniiiry whe re ][r acl ionsKJ^^Jfc^. AtffclH^nd 
15 per cent. Mho 'ros^#. is for ;r dozifN^Jrf s 
51 per cent, of the list, or $6.89 : a single 
article 4 1-4 per cent., or "> s cents. 

Sometimes the net per cent, single cost 
will be readily converted into a more con- 
venient common fraction. Thus at In pei 
cent, discount, the net cost pel' cent, being 
7 1-2, and as the ratio to the number of 
dimes to the list price is ten times as 
great, the equivalent will be 75 per cent.. 
or, expressed in a common fraction, three- 
fourths of the number of dimes per dozen 
list. This is the same in effect as taking 
three-fourths of the li.-t and cutting off the 

right hand figure, but involves less figures. 

At $13.50 lisi the resuH would therefore lie 

three-fourths of L35, which is si. ill. Using 
the same list in each of the following ex- 
amples, we find in like manner that with 
211 per cent, discount, the net per cent. 
single cost being 6 2-3, the result in cents 
is (i() 2-."5 per cent., or two-thirds of 135, 
which is 90. cents. 

SOME EXAMPLES. 
At 25 p.c. discount it is 6J< p.c. of list, or y* of 135, 

which is 85 
At 40 p.c. discount it is 5 p.c. of list, or % of 135, 

which is 68. 
At 50 and 10 p.c. discount it is 3^3 p.c. of list, or 

% of 135, which is 51. 
At 60 p.c. discount it is 3^3 p.c. of list, or % of 135, 

which is 45. 
At 70 p.c. discount it is 2% p.c of list, or % of 135, 

which is 34. 
At 85 p.c. discount it is l# p.c. of list, or l / s of 135, 

which is 17 



It will be seen that the same common 
fractions are obtained more quickly by 
dividing the single cost per cent, lis ten. 
I have introduced the percentage In dimes 
as an explanation of the principle. 

COMBINATION DISCOUNTS. 

There are a number of combination dis- 
counts which arc' equivalent to the above 
and. therefore. will work out the same 
results. For example, 40 per cent, equals 
25 and 20, or 20 and 16 2-3 and 10, or 33 
l-ii and 10. They will be recognized as 
I hey are used, and a complete list of them 
will be found in " Ladd's Discount Book." 
By the use of the above method one can, 
after a little practice, give the net single 
price ajmost instoptly upon knowing the 
list and discount, and usually without the 
tiid of a pencil. 

WHERE REPETITIONS OCCUR. 

Ayain. when there occurs in the dis- 
count a repetition, as. for example of 
several tens, it is not necessary to make 

a complete calculation for each, but by 
cither finding the net cost per cent., or. as 
in some cases it ma y be more convenient, 
having found the First amount to be deduct- 
ed, each succeeding amount will decrease 
regularly by the rate per cent, hist used. 
Subtract the sum of the amounts thus 
found, counting as a cent each fraction ex- 
ceeding 1-2 cent. Given $4.58, less three 
Ill's and 5 per cent., we have, first sub- 
traction, Hi cents : second, Hi per cent 
less, or II cents ; third. 37 cents ; fourth, 
( one half of .'ST. less II) per cent . ), 17 ; 
total. SI. II. which, being deducted from 

$4.58, leaves s:!.l7. Another example: 
$18.63, less 25 and three Id's. "ives. first, 
$4.66; second (SI.SC. less 25 per cent.), 



Customers, especially the ladies, when 
Ltiven a price per square foot, frequently ask 
the price per yard of wire cloth. The 
answer, which may be given readily, will 
be, for every cent per square foot one- 
fourth as many cents as there are inches in 
width. because each inch of width gives 
one-fourth of a square foot to the yard of 
length. Thus. 30-inch wire cloth at :'. 

cents per square foot would lie three-f > 

of I'll, or 22 1-2 cents per linear or 1111 
yard. Of course, in reckoning the value 
of your stile, some fractions of the yard are 
not convenient. In such eases find the 
surface measure, but not as some clerks do, 
by the long and tedious process of finding 
the number .of square inches and reducing 
that to feet. The use of duodecimals is 
much shorter. Clerks who have not learned 
that method will be well repaid if they 
spend the little time required in learning 
it. — lion Age. 



HONESTY AND SAGACITY. 

A great broker once told his son that only- 
two things were necessary to make a great 
financier. 

"And what are those, papa?" the son 
asked. 

" Honesty and sagacity." 

" And what do you consider the mark of 
honesty to be ? " 

" Always to keep your word." 

" And the mark of sagacity ? " 

" Never to give your word." 



American Sheet Steel Company 

"" »I^ttery Park Building 
New York 
Manufacturers of all varieties of 

Iron and Steel Sheets 
Black and Galvanized 
Plain and Painted 
Flat, Corrugated and 
"V" Crimped 

Apollo Best Bloom Galvanized 
W. Dewees Wood Company's 

Patent Planished Iron 
W. Dewees Wood Company's 

Refined Smooth Sheets 
Wellsville Polished Steel Sheets 

Representatives for Canada 
B. & S. H. Thomp-on & Company 
26 St. Sulpice Street 
Montreal 



M 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



33 



ii 



MIDLAND 



J5 



BRAND 



Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as fuel, "Mid- 
land" will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Write for Prices to Sales Agents: 

Drummond, McCall & Co. 

MONTREAL, QUE. 



or to 



Canada Iron Furnace Co. 



MIDLAND, ONT. 



Limited 



"The Peerless 



) J is the best Bolster Spring ever 
produced. A fine line for the 

hardware trade. Wr ite Us For Prices, 




James Warnock & Co. 



Gait, Ont. 



CUHHE^T ^VIAHKET QUOTATIONS 



August 2, 1901. 
These prices are tor such qualities and 

quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 
Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list as the desire 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

Tin. 

Lamb and Flag and Straits— 

56 and 28 lb. ingots, per lb. 31% 32 

Tinplates. 

Charcoal Plates— Bright 

M.L. 8. , equal to Bradley. P< r box 

I.C., usual sizes $6 75 

I.X., " 8 25 

I.X.X., " 9 75 

Famous— 

1.0 6 75 

I.X 8 15 

I.X.X 9 75 

Raven fc Vulture Grades— 

I.C.. usual sizes 4 75 

I.X., " 5 75 

I.X.X " 6 75 

I.XXX., " 7 75 

D.O.,12%xl7 4 *5 

D.X 5 00 

D.X.X 5 75 

Coke Plates— Bright 
Bessemer Steel— 

I.O.. usual sizes..*, 4 55 

I O.i special sizes, base 4 50 

20 1 28 9 00 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 
Dean or J. G. Grade— 

I. O. , 20x28, 112 sheets 9 00 

I.X. , Terne Tin 1100 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 

Cookley Grade— Per lb. 
X X.,14x56,50sheetbxs) 

" 14x60, " > .... C6% 

■' 14x65. " J 

Tinned Sheets 

72x30 up to 24 gauge 07% 

• r 26 " C8 

" 28 " 0ts% 

Iron and Steel. 

Common Bar, per 100 lbs.... 185 190 

Refined " " 2 35 

Horse Shoe Iron ' 2 35 

Hoop steel, 1% t0 3 in - ba8e i 

extras for smaller sizes 3 11 

Sleigh Shoe Steel " base — 2 10 

TireSteel.. ., 2 39 2 50 

Reeled Machinery 3 00 

ToeCalkSteel 2 85 3 00 

T Firth&Co's tool steel, per lb 12% 13 

Jessop's tool Steel 12% 13 

Morton's tool steel C 12V, 13 

Black Diamond and " B C," 

tool steel 10 11 

Drill Steel, per lb 0(8 lu 

Boiler Tubes. 

1%-incn 12% 

2 " 13 

2% " 15 

5^*4, 16 

35?*4 020 

4 " 25 

Steel Boiler Plate. 

% iuish 2 50 2 60 

3-16 inch 2 60 2 70 

*6 inch and thick, r 2 50 2 60 

Black Sheets. 

Com. D.F1. 

18gauge 2 85 3 00 

20 gauge 2 8> 3 CO 

22 to24 " 2 95 3 25 

26 " 3 05 3 50 

28 " 3115 



Canada Plate*. 

All dull, 52 sheets 2 90 

H*!f polished 3 UO 

All bright 3 £0 

Black pipe— Iron Pipe. 

Vs " 465 

% inch 3 40 

3 / B " 3 45 

% " 3 70 

% " 3 85 

1 " 5 40 

IK " 7 70 

1% " 9 !0 

2 " 12 50 

2% " 22 75 

3 " 30 

3% " 37 50 

4 " 42 75 

4'/, " 51 5U 

5 " " 57 50 

6 " 74 50 

Galvanized pipe — 

V, iDch 5 15 

% " 5 50 

1 " 7 9> 

1% " 10 80 

1% " 12 95 

2 " 17 35 

Galvanized Sheets. 

Queen's 
G C. Comet. Amer. Head. 
16 gauge ... 4 00 3 75 

18 to 24 gauge 4 00 3 85 4 25 4 00 
26 " 4 25 4 10 4 25 4 25 

28 " 4 50 4 35 4 40 4 50 

Case lots 10 to 15c. less. 

28 gauge American equals 26 gauge English. 
Chain. 

ProofCoil, 3-16 in., per 1001b 

% " 8 00 8 50 

5-16 " " 4 70 5 00 

" % " >■ 4 05 4 :o 

" 7-16 " " 3 9J 4 V5 

y 2 " " 3 JO 4 10 

9-16 " " 3 65 4 (5 

" % " " 3 ?5 3 90 

% " " 3 fO 4 10 

Halter, kennel and post chains, 40 to 40 and 

5 p.c. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Tie-out chains 65 p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 45 p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, dis- 
count 35 p c. 
Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis- 
count 40 p.c. 

Copper. 
Ingot 

English B.S., ton lots 17% 

Lake Superior 

Bais. 
Cut lengths round, % to % in. 23 25 
" round and square 

1 to 2 inches.... 23 25 
Sheet. 
Plain, 14 oz., and light, 16 

oz. , 14x48 and 14x60 24 S4% 

Plain, 14 oz., and light, 16 

oz., irregular sizes 21% 25 

Tinned copper sheets 26 

Planished 32 

Braziers tin sheets.) 

4x6ft. 25 to 30 lbs. ea., per lb 25 

" 35 to 45 " " .... 24 

50-lb. and above, " .... 23 
Boiler and T.K. Pitts 

Plain Tinned, per lb 28 

Spun.perlb 32 

Brass. 

Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge 10 per cent. 

Sheets, hard-rolled, 2x4 23 

Tubing, base, per t 23 

Zinc Spelter 

Foreign, per lb 05% 06 

Domestic " 



Zinc Sheet. 

5cwt. casks 00 6 1 /, 

Partcasks CO 6% 

Lead . 

Imported Pig, per lb 04% C4% 

Bar.llb 05'/ 2 05% 

Sheets, 2% lbs. sq. ft., by .... 06% 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lbs., " .... 06 

Note.— Cut sheets % cent per lb. extra. 
Pipe, by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists 
at 7c. per lb. and 30 p.c. dia. t.o.b. Toronto. 

Note.— Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 
8-ft. lengths lists at 7% cents. 

Shot. 

Common, $6.50 per 1(0 lb. ; chilled, $7.00 
per 100 lb. ; buck, seal and ball, $7.50. Dis- 
count, 17% PC. Prices are fob. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Terms 3 per cent, cash, freights equalized. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings. 
Discount, 60 and 10 per cent, on medium and 
extra heavy, and 60 per cent, on light. 

Solder. Per lb. Per lb. 
Bar half-and-half, guaranfd .... 19% 

Bar half-and-half, commer'l 19 

Refined 18% 

Wiping 18 

Note.— Prices of this graded according to 
quantity. The prices of other qualities of 
solder in the market indicated by private 
brands vary according to composition. 

Antimony. 

Cookson's, per lb 10'/, 11 

White Lead . Per 100 lb. 

Pure 6 37 

No.l do 6 00 

No.2do 5 62% 

No.3 do 5 55 

No. 4 do 4 87% 

Munro's Select Flake White 7 37% 

Elephant and Decorators' Pure 7 12% 

Brandram's B B. Genuice 7 50 

" Decorative 7 00 

" No. 1 6 50 

" No. 2 5 75 

Red Lead. 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt $5 50 

Genuine, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 5 75 

No. 1, 560 lb. casks, per cwt 5 25 

No. 1, 1001b. kegs, per cwt 5 00 

White Zinc Paint. 

Elephant Snow White 08 09 

Pure White Zinc, r 08 0(9 

No 1 06 07%. 

No. 2 05 C6% 

Dry White Lead. 

Pure, casks 5 75 

Pure, kegs 6 25 

No. l.casks 5 50 

No.l, kegs 5 00 

Prepared Paints. 

In %, % and 1 gallon tins. 

Pure, per gallon 125 

Second qualities.per gallon 1 IC 

Barn (inbbls.) 75 8"= 

The Sherwin-Williams Paints 1 45 

Canada Paint Co's Pure 1 25 

T. ronto Lead & d 1. r Co s Pure.... 1 2=i 

Sanderson Pearcy's Pure 1 20 

Stewart & Wood's Champion Pure. 1 20 

Colors in Oil. 

25 lb. tins, Standard Quality. 

Venetian Red, per lb 05 

Chrome Yellow 11 

Golden Ochre 06 

French " 05 

MarineBlack 09 

Green 09 

Chrome " 08 

French Imperial Green 09 



Colors, Dry. 

Yellow Ochre ( J. C. ) bbls.... 1,35 140 

Yellow Ochre J.F.L.S.), bbls ... 2 75 

Yellow Ochre (Royal) 110 115 

Brussels Ochre 2 00 

Venetian Red (best), per cwt. 180 190 

English Oxides, per cwt 3 00 3 25 

American Oxides, per cwt.. 1 75 2 00 

Canadian Oxides, per owt.,. . 175 2 00 

Super Magnetic Oxides, 93pc. 2 00 2 25 

Burnt Sienna, pure, per lb 10 

" Umber, " " 10 

do Raw 09 

Drop Black, pure 09 

Chrome Yellows, pure 18 

Chrome Greens, pure, per lb 12 

Golden Ocb re ... 03% 

Ultramarine Blue in 28-lb.. 

boxes, per lb 08 24 

fire Proof Mineral, per 100 lb .... 1 00 

Genuine Eng.Litharge, per lb 07 

Mortar Color, per 100 lb 125 

English Vermillion 80 

Pure Indian Red, No. 45 lb 80 

Whiting, per 100 lb 55 

Bine Stone. 

Casks, for spraying, per b 07 

100-lb. lots, do. per lb 08 

Pntty. 

Bulk in bbls 1 95 

Bulk in less quantity 2 05 

Bladders in bbls 2 10 

Bladders in kegs, boxes or loose. ... 2 25 

Bladders in 25-lb. tins 2 35 

Bladders in 12%-lb. tins 2 65 

Bladders in bu k or tins less than 1001b2 90 

Tarnishes. 

In 5-gal. lots.). Per gal. 

Carriage, No. 1 2 90 3 30 

" body 8 00 9 00 

" rubbing 4 00 5 00 

Gold Size, Japan 3 00 3 40 

Brown Japan 2 40 2 80 

Elastic Oak 2 90 3 30 

Furniture, extra 2 40 2 80 

No.l 1 60 2 00 

Hard Oil Finish 2 70 3 10 

Light Oil Finish 3 20 3 60 

Demar 3 31 3 70 

Shellac, white 4 40 4 80 

" orange 4 00 4 40 

Furniture Brown Japan 1 60 2 00 

Black Japan 2 40 2 8J 

" " No. 1 1 6J 2 00 

The Imperial Varnish & Color Co's., 
Limited Elastilite Varnish 1 gal. can, each. 
$30J. 

Granitine Floor Finish per gal., $2.75. 

Maple Leaf Coach Enamels ; Size 1, $1 20 ; 
Size 2, 70c. ; Size 3, 4jc. each. 

Castor OH. 

East India, in cases, per lb.. 10 10% 

" " smalllots 1U% 11 

Cod Oil, Etc. 

CodOilpergal 50 55 

PureOlive 1 20 

" Neatsfoot 90 

Glue. 

Common 08% 09 

French Medal 14 H% 

Cabinet sheet 12 13 

White, extra 18 20 

Gelatine 22 30 

Strip 18 20 

Coopers 19 20 

Huttner 18 



34 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



THOS. GOLDSWORTHY & SONS 

MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

Cloth 
Corn 

Flour 



EMERY 



We carry all numbers of Corn and Flour Emery in io-pound packages, from 8 to 140, 
in stock. Emery Cloth, Nos. OO., O., F., FF., 1 to 3. 






JAMES HUTTON & CO., Wholesale Agents for Canada, MOIltreal. 



HARDWARE. 

Amu, unit ion. 

Cartridges. 

B B Cap Dom. 50 and 5 per cane. 

Rim Fire Pistol, dis. 40 p. o., Amer. 

Rim Fire Cartridges, Dom., 50 and 5 p. o. 

Central Fire Pistol and Rifle, lOp.o. Amer. 

Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes, Dom. 
30 per cent. 

Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dom., 15 and 5 per cent. 

Central Fire. Military and Sporting, Amer. 
add 5 p.c. to list. B.B. Caps, discount 40 
per cent. Amer. 

Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap" and 
" Dominion " grades, 25 per cent. Rival 
and Nitro, 10 p.c. advance on list. 

Brass Shot Shells, 55 per cent. 

Primers, Dom., 30 per cent. 

Wads per lb- 

Best thiok white felt wadding, in %-lb 

bags 1 00 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

%-lb.bags 70 

BeBt thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and Bmaller gauges 99 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 35 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 8gauge 55 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge 25 

Thin card wads in boxes of 1,000 
each, 8 gauge 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wadB, in boxes of 250 each— Per M. 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and 1C gauges 70 

7and8gauges 90 

5 and 6 gauges 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 gauges 1 65 

5 and 6 gauges 1 90 

Adzes. 

Discount, 20 per cent. 

Anvils. 

Wright's, 80-lb. and over lO-^ 

Hay Budden, 80-lb. and over 09% 

Brook's, ... 11% 

Angers. 

Gilmour's, discount 65 and 5 p.c. off list. 

Axes. 
Chopping A.xes 

Single bit, per doz 5 50 10 00 

Double bit, " 11 00 18 00 

Bench Axes, 40 p.c. 
Broad Axes, 33% per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boy's Axes 5 75 6 75 

Splitting Axes 6 50 12 00 

HandledAxes 7 00 10 00 

Axle Grease. 

Ordinary, per gross 5 75 6 00 

Bestquality 13 00 15 00 

Batb Tubs. 

Zinc •••• ;•••,. 600 

Copper, discount 15 p.c. off revised list 

Baths. 

Standard Enameled. 

5%-inch rolled rim, 1st quality 25 00 

2nd " 21 00 

Antl-Frlctlon Metal. 

"Tandem" A per lb. 27 

B " 21 

C " 11% 

Magnolia Anti-Friction Metal, per lb. 25 

Frictionless metal, per lb 23 

SYRACUSE SMELTING WORKS. 

Aluminum, genuine 45 

Dynamo 29 

Special ;,•• 25 

Aluminum, 99 p.c. pure "Syracuse .. 50 

Bells. 

Hand. 
Brass, 60 per cent. 
N ickel, 55 per cent. 



Cow. 
American make, discount 66% per oent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 
Door. 

Gongs, Sargant's 5 50 8 00 

" Peterboro', disoount 45 per cent. 
Farm. 

American, each 125 3 00 

House. 

American, per lb 35 40 

Bellows. 

Hand, per doz 3 35 4 75 

Moulders', per doz 7 50 10 00 

Blacksmiths', discount 40 per cent. 

Belting;. 
Extra, 60, 10 and 5 per cent. 
Standard, 70 per cent. 
No. 1, 70 and 10 p.c. 

Bits. 
Auger. 
Gilmour'B, discount 60 and 5 per cent. 
Rockford, 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings' Gen., net list. 
Car. 
Gilmour's, 47% to 50 per cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Damond, Shell, per doz 100 150 

Nail and Spike, per pross 2 25 5 20 

Blind and Bed Staples. 

All sizes, per lb 07% 12 

Bolts and Nuts. Percent. 
Carriage Bolts, full square, Norway — 65 

" " full square 65 

Common Carriage Bolts, all sizes 60 

Machine Bolts, all sizes 60 

Coach Screws 70 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 72% 

Blank Bolts 60 

Bolt Ends 62% 

Plough Bolts 60 

Nuts, square 4 c. off 

NutB, hexagon 4%c. off 

Tire Bolts 67% 

Stove Bolts 67% 

Stove rods, per lb 5% to 6c. 

Nuti, io531b. lots %o. per lb extra in less 
than 5 J lb, lots, %o, extra. 

Boot Calks . 

Small and medium, ball, per M 4 25 

Small heel, per M 4 50 

Bright Wire Goods. 

Discount 6 ;% per cent. 

Broilers . 
Light, dis., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Reversible, dls., 65 to 67% per cent. 
Vegetable, per doz., dis. 37% per cent. 

Henis, No. 8, " 6 00 

Henis, No. 9, " 7 00 

Queen City " 7 50 00 

Butchers' Cleavers. 

German, per doz 6 00 1100 

Amerioan, per doz 12 00 20 00 

Building Paper, Etc. 

Plain building, per roll 30 

Tarred lining, per roll 40 

Tarred roofing, per 100 lb 1 65 

Coal Tar, per barrel 3 50 

Pitch, per 100-lb 85 

Carpet felt, per ton 45 10 

Bull Rings. 
Copper , $2.00 for 2% in. and $1.90 for 2 in. 

Butts. 
Wrought Brass, net revised ist 

Cast Iron. 
Loose Pin, dis., 6u per cent. 

Wrought Steel. 
Fast Joint, dis. 65, 10 and 2% per cont. 
Loose Pin, dis. 65, 10 and 2% per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, dis. 70, 70 and 5 per o nt. 

Gen. Bronzed, per pair 40 65 

Carpet Stretchers . 

American, per doz 100 150 

Billiards, per doz 6 50 

Castors. 
Bed, new list, dis. 55 to 57% percent. 
Plate, dis. 52% to 57% per cent. 

Cattle Leaders. 
Nos. 31 and 32, per gross 50 9 50 



Cement. 

Canadian Portland 2 50 2 80 

English " 3 00 

Belgian " 2 50 2 75 

Canadian hydraulio 125 150 

Chalk. 
Carpenters Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump, per cwt 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon, per gross 14 18 

Chisels. 
Socket, Framing and Firmer. 
Broad's, dis. 70 per cent. 
Warnock's, dis. 70 per cent. 
P. S. & W. Extra 60, 10 and 5 p.c. 

Churns. 
Revolving Churns, metal frames— No. 0, $8— 
No. 1, $8.50— No. 2, $9.00— No. 3, $10.00— 
No. 4, $12.00— No. 5, $16.00 each. Ditto, 
wood frames — 20c. each less than above. 
Discounts : Delivered from factories, 58 
p.c. ; from stock in Montreal, 56 p.c. 
Terms, 4 months or 3 p.c. cash in 30 days. 
Clips. 
Axle dis. 65 per cent. 

Closets 

Plain Ontario Syphon Jet $16 00 

Emb. Ontario Syphon Jet 17 00 

Fittings net 1 00 

Plain Teutonic Syphon Washout. ... 10 00 
Emb. Teutonic Syphon Washout. ... 11 00 

Fittings net 1 25 

Low Down Teutonic, plain 16 CO 

" " " embossed 17 00 

Plain Richelieu net 3 75 

Emb. Richelieu net 4 00 

Fittings net 1 25 

Low Down Oat. Sy. Jet, plain net. . 19 50 

' " emb'd. net 20 50 

ClOBet connection net 1 25 

Basins, round, 14 in 1 00 

" oval, 17 x 14 in 2 50 

" 19xl5in 3 75 

Discount 40 p.c, except on net figures. 
Compasses, Dividers, Etc. 
American, dis. 62% to 65 per cent. 

Cradles, Grain. 
Canadian, dis. 25 to 33% per oent. 
Crosscut Saw Handles. 

S. & D., No. 3, per pair 

" 5, " 



• 17% 
.22% 
.15 
.20 



Boynton pattern " 

Door Springs. 

Torrey's Rod, per doz (15 p.c.) 2 00 

Coil, per doz 88 160 

English, per doz 2 00 4 00 

Draw Knives. 
Coach and Wagon, dis. 50 and 10 per cent. 
Carpenters, dis. 70 per cent. 
Drills. 
Hand and Breast. 
Millar's Falls, per doz. net list. 
DRILL BITS. 
Morse, dis., 37% to 40 per oent. 
Standard dis. 50 and 5 to 55 per cent 

Faucets. 
Common, cork-lined, dis. 35 per cent. 
ELBOWS. (Stovepipe.) 

No. 1, per doz I 40 

No. 2, per doz 1 20 

Bright, 20c. per doz. extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 
Discount, 45 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 
Iron, discount 40 per cent. 

FACrORY MILK CANS. 
Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 
FILES AND RASPS. 

Great Western 75 and 5 per cent. 

Disston 70 " 10 ■' 

Arcade 75 " 5 " 

Kearney * Foot 70 " 10 " 

Amerioan 75 " 5 " 

McClellan 70 " 5 " 

Eagle 70 10 and 5 " 

Nicholson 70 " 10 " 

Heller 60 " 10 " 

Royal & Keystone 80 p.c. and 80 and 10 p.c. 
Black Diamond, 60 to ijj and 10 per oent. 
Jowitt's, English list, 25 to 27% per cent. 

FORKS. 
Hay, manure, etc., dis., 50 and 10 per cent, 
revised list. 



GLASS— Window— Box Price. 

Star D. Diamond 

Size United Per Per Per Per 
Inches. 50 ft. 100 ft 50 ft. 100 ft. 

Under 26 2 15 4 15 .... 6 00 

26to40 2 30 4 45 .... 6 63 

41to50 4 85 .... 7 50 

51to60 5 15 .... 8 50 

61to70 5,50 .... 9 50 

71to80 6 00 .... 10 50 

81 to 85 6 50 .... 1175 

86to90 14 00 

91to95 15 50 

99tol00 18 00 

GAUGES 
Marking, K jrtise, Etc 
Stanley's dis. 50 to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 
Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33, each... 165 2 40 
HALTERS. 

Rope, % per gross 

,r % " 900 

" %to% 1« 00 

Leather, I in., per doz 3 87% 4 00 

" l%in., " 5 15 5 20 

Web, —per doz 187 2 45 

HAMMERS. 
Nail 
Maydole's, dis. 5 to 10 per cent. Can. dis. 
25 to 27% per cent. 

Tack. 

Magnetic, per doz 110 120 

Sledge. 

Canadian, per lb ... 07% 08X 

Ball Pean. 
English and Can., per lb.... 22 25 
HANDLES. 

Axe.perdoz.net 150 2 00 

Store door, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Fork. 
C. 4 B., dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 

Hoe. 
C. & B., dis. 40 per cent. rev. list. 
Saw. 

American, per doz 100 125 

Plane. 

American, per gross 3 15 S 75 

Hammer and Hatchet. 
Canadian, 40 percent. 

Cross-Cut Saws. 

Canadian, per pair 13% 

HANGERS. doz. pairs. 

Steel barn door 5 85 6 00 

Stearns, 4 inch 5 00 

" 5 inch 6 50 

Lane's covered- 
No. 11, 5-ft. run 8 40 

No. 11%, 10-ft.run 10 80 

No. 12, 10-ft.run 12 60 

No. 14, 15-ft. run 2100 

Lane's O.N. T. track, per foot. .... 4% 

HARVEST TOOLS. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 
HATCHETS. 
Canadian, dis. 40 to 42% per cent. 

HINGES. 
Blind, Parker's, dis. 50 and 10 to 60 per cent. 

Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb 06% 

" 5-in., " .... 06'/ 4 

" " 6-in., " 06 

" " 8-in., " .... 05% 

" 10-in., " .... 05% 
Light T and strap, dis. 65 and 5 per cent. 
Screw hook and hinge— 

6 to 10 in., per 100 lbs 3 90 

12 in. up, per 100 lbs 3 00 

Per gro. pairs. 

Spring 12 00 

HOES. 
Garden, Mortar, etc., dis. 50 and 10 p.c. 

Planter, per doz 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE 

Disoount 45 and 5 per cent 

HOOKS. ,. & 

Cast Iron. I 

Bird Cage, per doz 50 110 

Clothes Line, per doz 27 63 

Harness, per doz 72 88 

Hat and Coat, per gross 1 00 3 00 

Chandelier, per doz 50 100 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought Hooks and Staples, Can., dls. 
47% per cent. 

Wire. 
Hat and Coat, discount 45 per eent. 

Belt, per 1,000 60 

Screw, bright, dig. 55 per oent. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



35 



u 



Syracuse Babbitt Metal 



IT IS THE 
BEST MADE. 



fi 




\ ; 



For 
Paper and Pulp 
Mills, Saw and 
Wood Working 
Machinery, Cotton 
and Silk Mills, 
Dynamos, Marine 
Engines, and all 
kinds of 
Machinery 
Bearings. 



Wire, Triangular and Bar Solder, Pig Tin, Lead, Ingot Copper, Ingot Brass, Antimony, Aluminum, Bismuth, Zinc Spelter, 
Phosphor Tin, Phosphor Bronze, Nickle, etc., always in stock. 



v f • J33 2 William St., MONTREAL, QUE. 

factories ■ 1 and SYRACUSE, N.Y. 



Syracuse Smelting Works 



HORSE NAILS. 
"C'brand 50 and 7%p.c.off new litl Oval - 
"M" brand 50, 10 and 5 per cent. J head 
Countersunk 60 per cent 

HORSESHOES 

F.O.B. Montreal. 
No. 2 No. 1. 
Iron Shoes. and and 

larger, smaller. 
Light, medium, and heavy. 3 50 3 75 

Snow shoes 3 75 4 00 

Steel Shoes. 

Light 3 60 3 85 

Featherweight (all sizes) 4 85 4 85 

F.O.B. Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Guelph, 10c. per keg additional. 

Toe weighc steel shoes 6 70 

JAPANNED WARE. 
Discount, 45 and 5 p c. off list, June 1899 
ICE PICKS. 

Star per doz 3 00 3 25 

KETTLES. 
Brass spun, 7% p.c. dis. off new list. 

Copper, per lb 30 50 

American, 60 and 10 to 65 and 5 p.c. 

KEYS. 
Lock, Can., dis., 45 p.c. 
Cabinet, trunk, and padlock, 

Am. per gross 60 

KNOBS. 
Door, japanned and N.P., per 

doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin, per doz 2 75 3 25 

Bronze Genuine, per doz 6 00 9 00 

Shutter, porcelain, F. ft L. 

screw, per gross 1 30 4 00 

White door knobs— per doz. 1 25 

HAY KNIVES. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 

LAMP WICKS. 
Discount, 60 per cent. 

LANTERNS. 

Cold Blast, per doz 7 00 

Wo. 3 "Wright's" 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner 4 00 

Dashboard, cold blast 9 00 

No. 5 75 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

Porcelain lined per doz. 2 20 5 60 

Qalvanized 187 3 85 

King, wood 2 75 2 90 

King, glass 4 00 4 50 

Allglass 120 130 

LINES. 

Pish, pergross 105 2 50 

Chalk " 1 90 7 40 

LOCKS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 

Russel & Erwin, per doz 3 00 3 25 

Cabinet. 
Eagle, dis. 30 p.c. 

Padlock 
English and Am., perdoz.... 50 6 00 
Scandinavian, V .... 1 00 2 40 

Eagle, dis. 20 to 25 p.c 

MACHINE SCREWS. Iron and Brass. 
Flat head discount 25 p.c 
Round Head discount 20 p.c. 
MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths' perdoz 1 25 1 50 

Carpenters', hickory, per doz 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Vitae, per doz 3 85 5 00 

Caulking each 60 2 00 

MATTOCKS. 
Canadian, perdoz 5 50 6 50 

MEAT CUTTERS. 
American, dis. 25 to 30 p.c. 
German, 15 per cent. 

MILK CAN TRIMMINGS. 
Discount, 25 per cent. 

, NAILS. 

„,-». ktlonsare : Out. Wire. 

2d and 3d $3 45 $3 85 

J d ••,■••• 3 10 3 52 

« aQ d5d 2 85 3 35 

S and7 <! 2 75 3 20 

?n and , 9d „i 2 SO 3 10 

}2 and ,J2 d 255 2 95 

16and20d 2 50 2 90 

30. 40, 50 and 60d. ( base) 2 45 2 85 

Wire nails in oarlots are $2.77 V 2 

Galvanizing 2o. per lb. net extra. 

Steel Cut Nails lOo. extra. 

Miscellaneous wire nails, dis. 70 and 10 p. c 



Coopers' nails, dis. 30 per cent. 
Flour barrel nails, dis 25 percent 
NAIL PULLERS. 

German and American 185 3 50 

NAIL SETS 
Square, round, and octagon 

per gross 3 38 4 00 

Diamond 12 00 15 00 

NETTING. 
Poultry, 55 per cent for McMullen's 

OAKUM. Per 100 lb. 

Navy 6 00 

U.S.Navy 7 25 

OIL. 

Water White (U.S.) 16% 

Prime White (U.S ) 15% 

Water White (Can.) 15 

Prime White(Can.) 14 

OILERS. 
McClary's Model galvan. oil 
can, with pump, 5 gal., 

per doz 10 00 

Zinc and tin, dis. 50, 50 and 10. 

Copper, per doz 125 3 50 

Brass, " 1 50 3 50 

Malleable, dis. 25 per cent. 

GALVANIZED PAILS. 

Dufferin pattern pails, dis. 45 p.c. 
Flaring pattern, discount 45 per cent. 
Galvanized wash tubs, discount 45 per cent. 

PIECED WARE. 
Discount 10 per cent, off list, June, 1899. 
10-qt. flaring sap buckets. Sit. 45 p.c. 
6, lu and 14-qt. fl .ring pai s, dis. 45 p.c. 
Creamer cans, dis. 45 p c. 

PICKS. 
Perdoz 6 00 9 00 

PICTURE NAILS. 
Porcelain head, per gross.... 175 3 00 
Brass head " .... 40 1 00 

PICTURE WIRE. 
Tin and gilt, discount 75 p c. 
PLANES. 
Wood, bench, Canadian dis. 50 per cent. 

American dis. 50. 
Wood, fancy Canadian or American 7% 
to 40 per cent. 

PLANE IRONS. 

English, perdoz 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 
Button's Genuine per doz pairs, dis. 37% 

40 p.c. 
Button's Imitation, per doz.. 5 00 9 00 
German, perdoz 60 2 60 

PLUMBERS BRASS GOODS. 
Compression work, discount, 60 per cent. 
Fuller's work, discount 65 per cent. 
Rough stops and stop and waste cocks, dis- 
count, 60 per cent. 
Jenkins disk globe and angle valves, dis- 
count, 55 per cent. 
Standard valves, discount. 60 per per cent. 
Jenkins radiator valves, discount 55 per cent. 
" " " standard, dis., 60 p.c. 

Quick opening valves discount, 60 p.c. 

No. 1 compression bath cock 2 00 

No. 4 " " •' 2 00 

No. 7, Fuller's 2 50 

No 4%, " 3 00 

POWDER. 
Velox Smokeless Shotgun Powder. 

1001b. or less 85 

1,000 lb. or more 80 

Net 30 days. 
PRESSED SPIKES. 
Discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse, per doz 55 100 

Axle 22 33 

Sorew o 27 1 00 

Awning 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 180 3 60 

Canadian pitcher spout 1 40 2 10 

PUNCHES. 

Saddlers', perdoz 100 185 

Conductors', " 9 00 15 00 

Tinners' solid, per set 00 72 

" hollow, pet nch. ... 00 1 00 



RANGE BOILERS. 

Galvanized, 3 gallons 7 CO 

" 35 " 8 25 

40 " 9 50 

Copper, 30 " 22 00 

fi 35 " 26 00 

40 " 30 00 

Discount off Copper Boilers 10 per cent. 

RAKES. 
Cast steel and malleable, 50, 10 and 5 p.c. 
Wood, 25 per cent. 

RAZORS. 

per doz. 

Elliot's 4 00 18 00 

Geo. Butler ft Co.'s 4 00 18 00 

Boker's 7 50 11 OP 

" King Cutter 12 50 50 00 

Wade & Butcher's... 3 60 10 00 

Theile ft Quack's 7 00 12 00 

REAPING HOOKS. 
Discount, 50 and 10 per cent. 
REGISTERS. 

Discount 40 per cent. 

RIVETS AND BURRS. 
Iron Rivets, black and tinned, discount 60 

and 10 per cent. 
Iron Burrs, liscount 55 per cent. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in 1-lb. cartons, %c. 

per lb. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in %-lb. cartons, lc. 

per lb. 
Copper Rivets ft Burrs, 35 and 5 p.c. dis. 

and cartons, lc. per lb. extra, net. 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets 
%-lb. cartons, lc. per lb. 
RIVET SETS 
Canadian, dis. 35 to 37% per cent. 
ROPE ETC. 

Sisal. Manila. 
7-16 in. and larger, per lb 10 13% 

%in 11 14% 

% and5-16in 15% 

Cotton , 3-1 6 inch and larger 16 

" 5-32inch 21 

Vsinch 22% 

Russia Deep Sea 15% 

Jute 8 

Lath Yarn 9% 

New Zealand Rope 10 

RULES. 
Boxwood, dis. 75 and 10 p.o. 
Ivory, dis. 37% to 40 p,c. 

SAD IRONS. per set. 

Mrs.Potts, No. 55, poliBhed 62% 

" No. 50, nickle-plated 67% 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 
Dominion Flint Paper, 47% pe cent. 
B & A. sand, 40 and 5 per cent. 
Emery, 40 per cent. 
Garnet (Rurton's), 5 to 10 p.c. advance on list. 

SAP SPOUTS. 
Bronzed iron with hooks, per doz. . . 9 50 

SAWS. 
Hand Disston's, dis. 12% p.o. 
S. ft D , 40 per cent. 

Crosscut, Disston's, per ft 35 55 

S. ft D., dis. 35 p.c. on Nob. 2 and3. 

Hack, complete, each 75 2 75 

' frame only 75 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional, per 100 lbs 2 75 3 00 

Solid, " 2 00 2 25 

SASH CORD. 

Per lb 23 30 

SAW SETS. 
"Lincoln" and Wh'ting, per doz... R CO 
HandSeis, No. 1 Woodyalt (Morrill) 4 25 
X-cut sets, No. 3 Woodyatt (Mirrill) 9 50 

SCALiES, 
Standard, 45 p.c. 
Champion, 65 p.c. 
Spring Balances, 10 p.c. 
Fairbanks Standard, 35 p.c. 
" Dominion, 55 p.c. 

" Richelieu, 55 p.c. 

SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's per doz 65 100 

SCREWS 
Wood, F. H., bright and steel, 87% and 10 p.c. 
Wood R. H., " dis. 82% and 10 p.o. 
" F. H., brass, dis. 80 and 10 p.o. 



Wood, R. H., " dis. 75 and 10 p.o. 

" F.H., bronze, dis. 75 p.o. 

" R.H. " 70 p.c. 
Drive Screws, 87% and 10 percent. 
Bench , wood, per doz 3 25 4 00 

" iron. " 4 25 5 75 

Set, Case hardened, 60 per cent. 
Square Cap, 50 and 5 per cent. 
Hexagon Cap, 45 per cent. 

SCYTHES. 
Per doz, net 9 00 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 
Canadian, dis. 45 p.c. 

SHEARS. 
Bailey Cutlery Co., full nickeled, dis. 60 p.c 
Seymour's, dis. 50 and 10 p.o. 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 
Canadian, dis. 40 and 5 per cent. 

SINKS. 
Steel and galvanized, discount 45 per cent. 

SNAPS. 
Harness, German, dis. 25 p.c. 

Lock, Andrews' 4 50 1150 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

1, l%lb., perlb 37 

2 lb. or over, per lb 34 

SQUARES. 

Iron, No. 493, perdoz 2 40 2 55 

" Mo. 494, " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, dis. 60. 10 and 5 p.c. 
Try and bevel, dis. 50 to 52% p.o. 
STAMPED WARE. 
Plain, dis. , 75 and 12% p.c. off revised list 
Retinned, dis., 75 p.c. off revised list. 
STAPLES. 

Galvanized 3 50 4 00 

Plain 3 25 3 75 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent. 
Poultry netting staples, 40 per cent. 
STOCKS AND DIES. 
American dis. 25 p.c. 

STONE. Per lb. 

Washita 28 60 

Hindostan 06 07 

" slip 09 09 

Labrador 13 

" Axe o 15 

Turkey o 50 

Arkansas fj 00 150 

Water-of-Ayr 00 10 

Scythe, per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind.2in,40 to 200 lb.per ton 25 00 

" under 40 lb. " .... 28 00 

Grind, under 2 in. thick " 29 00 

STOVE PIPES. 

5 and 6 inch Per 100 lengths 7 00 

7 inch " " 7 50 

ENAMELINE STOVE POLISH. 

No. 4— 3 dozen in case, net oash .... $4 80 

No. 6— 3 dozen in case, " .... 8 40 

TACKS BRADS, ETC. 

Cheese-box tacks, blued 80 4 12% 

Trunk tacks," black and tinned ... .85 
Carpet tacks, blued 80 ft 15 

11 " tinned 80 ft 20 

" " (in kegs) 40 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only . .80 

" % weights 60 

Swedes cut tacks, blued and tinned— 

In bulk 80 ft 10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk 85, 12% ft 12% 

" brush, blued ft tinned, bulk.. 70 
" gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 ft 12% 

Zino tacks 35 

Leather carpet tacks 55 

Copper tacke 50 

Copper nails 55% 

Trunk nails, black 65 and 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout nails, blued 65 and 5 

Chair nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing , 40 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 



36 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



STANDARD CHAIN CO., 

CHAIN 



PITTSBURGH, 



MANUFACTURERS 
OF- 



U. S. A. 



OF ALL KINDS. 



Proof Coil, B.B., B.B.B., Crane, Dredge Chain, Trace Chains. Cow Ties etc. 

ALEXANDER GIBB. „ j- -o *• A. C. LESLIE & CO.. 

■ v2«S2l ' -Canadian Representatives- t £treal 



Montreal. 

For Provinces of Ontario and Quebec. 



For other Provinces. 



Lining tacks, in bulk 15 

" " solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails in papers JO 

" in bulk •■ 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in dozens only 60 

Tin oapped trunk nails 15 

Zino glazier's points •""■.' 

Double pointed tacks, papers 90 and 10 

•« " " bulk 40 

TAPE LINES. 
English, ass skin, per doz... 2 75 5 00 
English, Patent Leather.... 5 50 9 75 

Chesterman's each 90 ; 85 

" steel, each 80 8 00 

THERMOMETERS. 
Tin case and dairy, dis. 75 to 75 and 10 p.c. 

TRAPS. (Steel.) 
dame, Newhouse, dis. 2i p.c. 
Oame, H.tN., P. S. & W.. 65 p.o. 
Game, steel, 72%, 75 p.o. 

TROWELS. 

Disston's discount 10 per cent. 

German, per doz 4 75 6 00 

8. * D., discount 35 per cent. 
TWINES. 

Bag, Russian, per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply 18/ 2 

■' " 4-ply 23y 2 

Mattress, per lb 33 045 

Staging, " 27 35 



VISES. 

Wright's 13% 

Brooks 12V 4 

Pi oe Vise, Hinge, No. 1 3 50 

No 2 5 50 

Saw Vise 4 5; 9 CO 

ENAMELLED WARE. 

White, Princess, Turquoise, Blue and White, 

discount 50 per cent. 
Diamond, Famous, Premier, 50 and 10 p.c. 
Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent, 50, 10 

and 10 per cent. 

WIRE. 

Brass wire, 50 to 50 and 2% per cent, off the 

list. 
Copper wire, 45 and 10 per cent, net cash 30 
days, f.o.b. factory. 
Smooth Steel Wire, is quoted at the 
following net selling prices: 

No. 6 to 8 gauge $2 90 

" 9 " 2 80 

" 10 " 2 87 

" 11 " 2 90 

" 12 " 2 95 

" 13 " 3 15 

" 14 " 3 37 

" 15 " 3 50 

" 16 " 3 65 

Other sizes of plain wire outside of Nos. 9, 
10, 11, 12 and 13. and other varieties of 
plain wire remain at 32.8) base with 



extras as before. The prices for Nos 9. 
to 13 include the charge of lie 
for oiling. Extras net per 100 lb.: 
Coppered wire, 60c— tinned wire, $2— 
oiling, 10c— special hay-bailing wire, 30c 
—spring wire, $1— best steel wire, 75c— 
bright soft drawn, 15c— in 50 and 100-lb. 
bundles net, 10c— in 25-lb. bundles net 
15c — packed in casks or cases, 15c— 
bagging or papering, 10c. 

Fine Steel Wire, dis. 17 l /j per cent. 
List of extras : In 100-lh. lots : No. 
17, $5— No. 18, $5.50— No. 19, $6-No. 20, 
$6.65-No. 21, $7— No. 22, $7.30— No. 23, 
7.65 -No. 24, $8— No. 25, $9-No. 26, 
89.50— No. 27, $10-No. 28, $11 No. 29. 
$12-No. 30, $13— No. 31,$14-No. 32, $15 
No. 33, $16— No. 34. $17. Extras net- 
tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, $2— Nos. 26-31 
$4— Nos. 32-34, $6. Coppered, 5c— oil 
ing, 10c— in 25-lb. bundles, 15c— in 5 and 
10-lb. bundles. 25c— in 1-lb. hanks, 50c— 
in V4-lb. hanks, 75c— in Vi-lb. hanks, $1— 
packed in casks orcases, 15c — bagging or 
papering, 10c 

Galvanized Wire, perlOOlb.— Nos. 6,7.8, $3 51 
to $3 8"— No. 9, $2.85 to $3.15— No. 10 
33.60 to $3.95— No. 11, $3 70 to $4.10-No 
12, $3 to $3 30-No. 13, $3.in to $3 40— 
No. 14. $4.1" to $4.50— No. 15, $4.60 to 
$5.05— No. 16. $4.85 to $5 35. Baee sizes, 
Nos. 6 to 9, $2.57 l / 2 f.o b. Cleveland. 

Clothes Line Wire, solid 7 strand. No. 17 



$4.25; No. 18, $2.65; No. 19, $2.35, f.o.b 
. Hamilton, Toronto, Monlreal. 
WIRE FENCING. 

Galvanized barb 3 05 

Galvanized, plain twist 3 05 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $2.82% 
in less than carlots, and $2.70 in carlots. 

WIRE CLOTH. 
Painted Screen, per 100 sq. ft., net.. 1 35 
WASTE COTTON. per lb. 

Colored i% to 5 

White, according to quality 6% to 7% 

500-lb bale lots shaded. 

WRENCHES. 
\cme, 35 to 37V4 per cent. 
Agricultural, 60 p.c. 
Coe's Genuine, dis. 20 to 25 p.c. 

Towers' Engineer, each 2 00 7 00 

" S., per doz 5 80 6 00 

G. A K 's Pipe, per doz 3 40 

Burrell's Pipe, each 3 00 

Pocket, per doz 25 2 90 

WRINGERS. 

Leader per doz. $30 33 00 

Royal Canadian.. " 26 00 28 00 

Royal American., " 26 00 28 00 

Sampson " 30 00 

Terms 4 months, or 3 p.c. 30 days. 
WROUGHT IRON WASHERS. 
Canadian make, discount, 40 per cent. 






WW os/lade/ 






THE OAKVILLE 

BASKET CO., 

Manufacturers of 
I, 2, 3 Bushel 

Grain 

AND 




Root 

THE OAKVILLE 

BASKET CO. 



DIAMOND STOVE PIPE DAMPER AND CLIP 




U. S. Patent June 25th, 1895. 
Canadian Pat. Dec. 13th, 1894. 



Sold by Jobbers of - - - 

HARDWARE 
TINWARE 
and STOVES, 

for furnace pipe, to support 
the sheet steel blade. 



./"' 



A 




MonilfopfnroH \\\t THE ADAMS COMPANY, Dubuque, Iowa. U.S.A. 

IVIdnilldUUrea Dy A . R . WOO dyatt & co., Gueiph, Ontario. 



Established 

183 J. 



Cable Address, 
"Bliss." 



MANUFACTURERS 

Wood Turnings, Hand 

Bench and other Screws 

Mallets, Handles, Vises 

Clamps, Tool Chests 

Croquet, Lithographs 

Wood Toys, Novelties 

and also the celebrated 

Wood's Patont Car 
Gate 

For Street and Steam Rail- 
road Cars, 
The R. BLISS MFG. CO. 

Pawtuekct, R.I., U.S.A. 



> X .. 



"THE EMLYN" SAW BENCH 

Made in 6 sizes. Best value obtainable. Specially 
designed for export. With or without " Emlyn " 
Patent Guard. So'e maker — 



CHARLES D. PHILLIPS, 

Cables— Emlyn Engineering Works, 

" Machinery," Newport. 



Newport, Mon., England. 



IF THE WORDS 

" Dundas Axe" 



are stamped on an Axe, you can 
rely on its being the best that 
can be made. 



DUNDAS AXE WORKS 

Dundas. Ont. 



PERSONS addressing advertisers 
will kindly mention having 
seen their advertisement in 
Canadian Hardware and Metal 

Merchant. 



Lockerby & McGomb 

AGENTS IN CANADA 

FOR THE 



Celebrated P. & B. 

Cold Storage Lining 



AND 



. . Ruberoid Roofing . . 

P. S.-- Prices on Application. 

65 Shannon Street, MONTREAL. 



BUSINESS 
NEWS 

of any kind that is of value to business men 
supplied by our Bureau. We can give you 
market quotations from any town in Can- 
ada, reports from the city markets, stock 
quotations, etc. You can get commercial 
news from any Canadian paper through us. 
Write us, giving us particulars of what 
you want and where you want it from, and 
we will quote you prices by return. 
i Clippings from any Canadian paper on 
any subject." 

CANADIAN PBESSCUPPIIG BUREAU, 

232 McGill Street, MONTREAL, QUE. 
Telephone Main 1255. 
10 Front St. East, Toronto. Telephone 2148. 



75 YEARS. 



CELEBRATED 



ESTABLISHED 1825. 



75 YEARS. 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS. 



Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers, Scissors, 
Tinners' Snips, etc. 




ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST. 



R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. SaE™ a 90 Chtmbtr ' at 

Not connected with any Shear Combination. 

CHAS. F. CLARK, President. JARED CHITTENDEN, Treasurer. 

...ESTABLISHED 1849... 



T" 



Capital and Surplus, $1,500,000. 



Offices Throughout the Civilized World. 



Executive Offices : Nos. 346 and 348 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers information that reflects the financial condition and 
the controlling circumstances of every seeker of mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the 
merchants, by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information no 
effort is spared, and no reasonable expense considered too great, that the results mayjustify its claim as an 
authority on all matters affecting commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have 
been steadily extended, and it furnishes information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized 
world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, jobbing 
and manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporations. 
Specific terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of its offices. Correspondence Invited. 



-OFFICES IN CANADA 



HALIFAX, N.S. 
OTTAWA. ONT. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 
QUEBEC, QUE. 
VICTORIA, B.C. 



LONDON, ONT. 
ST. JOHN. N.B. 
WINNIPEG, MAN. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



THOS. C, IRVING, Gen, Man. Western Canada, Toronto. JOHN A. FULTON, Gen. Man. Eastern Canada, Montreal. 




Woble® & Ho are. 

CORNWALL ROAD STAMFORD STREET. 

LONDON, ENG. 

Manufacturers of 

HIGH-CLASS VARNISHES ONLY 



Which can be obtained direct from the works 
or from the principal Color Dealers in Canada. 




(( 



BRASSITE' 




"^'STEREO TflAOt »***' 

None genuine without the 
above "Trade Mark." 

"Gunn's" 

Patent 

"Grassite" 

Goods. 

Equal to Solid Brass in every 
particular. Cost less money — 
look and wear as well. Our 
sales are increasing all the time. 
Why not increase your sales ? 

THE GUM CASTOR CO, 



Limited. 



KNOX HENRY, Canadian Agent, Room 32, Canada Life Bldg., MONTREAL. 



>^^%%r%^%/< 






Bit. 1868 



inc. 1895 



Black Diamond File Works 

6. & H. Barnett Company 

PHILADELPHIA 

Twelve »«*• ^ »*~ Medals 




!! 
1! 



Awarded 
By JURORS at 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 



I 




»^%^%^%^fy«v«v«v«>%^«yfvf>%%%^%^wf>%>%%^«^ 



1901 





L '90' 



We manufacture the most popular and best 
selling- lines of Garden Hose in Canada. Our "Mal- 
tese Cross" brand we confidently recommend as 
the finest Garden Hose on the market. 

We have other grades not quite so expensive, 
but good reliable brands, viz. : "Lion" (the popu^ - 
medium-priced hose), "King" "Sun" and "Leader." 

Our "Kinkproof " (wire wound) hose is wired 
by a special process controlled solely by ourselves, 
and is so constructed that it may be cut at any 
wind of the wire without loosening or uncoiling, 
the wire being* self-gripping throughout each 
length. 

The Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Go. 

OF TORONTO, LIMITED. 

Head Office and Warerooms- 
40-61-63 West Front St., 

TORONTO, C anada. 

Factories- 1 1 5- 1 66 West Lodge Ave. 
124-148 O'Hara Ave. 



American Sheet Steel Co., 

NEW YORK. 

Galvanized Steel Sheets, 

Black Steel Sheets, 

Dewees Wood Co.'s Polished Sheets. 



American Tin Plate Co., 

NEW YORK. 

Coke, Charcoal, and Terne Plates. 



PRICES ON APPLICATION TO 

B.&S. H.THOMPSON &C0'Y 

28 St. Sulpice St., MONTREAL, 



Selling Agents for Canada. 



CORDAGE 



ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



Manila Rope 
Sisal Rope 
Jute Rope 
Russian Rope 
Marline 
Housellne 
Hambrollne 
Clotheslines 
Tarred Hemp Rope 
White Hemp Rope 
Bolt Rope 
Hide Rope 
Halyards 
Deep Seallne 
Ratline 
Plow Lines 



Lathyarn 
Shlngleyarn 
Bale Rope 
Lariat Rope 
Hemp Packing 
Italian Packing 
Jute Packing 
Drilling Cables 
Spunyarn 
Pulp Cord 
Lobster Marlln 
Paper Cord 
Cheese Cord 
Hay Rope 
Fish Cord 
Sand Lines 



"RED THREAD" Transmission Rope from the finest quality Manila 
hemp obtainable, laid in tallow. 



CONSUMERS CORDAGE COM Pa;,,, 

"'■ Limited 

Western Ontario Representative— 

wm. b. stewart, MONTREAL, QUE. 

Tel 94. 27 Front St. West, TORONTO. 



Copper, Tin, Antimony, Etc 

LANGWELL S BABBITT 

Montreal. 




The Weekly Organ of the Hardware. Metal, Heating. Plumbing and Contracting Trades In Canada. 



VOL. XIII. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, AUGUST 10, 1901. 



NO. 32 



••TANDEM" ANTI-FRICTION METAL. 



'Tandem" Metals are better than 
any other tor their purpose, 
and are, therefore : 



Resistance Reducing. 
Journal Preserving. 
Power Increasing. 
Lubricant Saving. 



The Most Economical. 
The Least Wearing. 
The Most Durable. 

Friction Preventing. 

A QUALITY 

For Heaviest Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Heavy Pressure and High Speed, 

B QUALITY 

For Heavy Pressure and Medium Speed 
or Medium Pressure and High Speed. 

C QUALITY 

For Medium Pressure and High Speed 
or Low Pressure and Highest Speed. 

Sole Agents : 

LAMPLOUGH A McNAUGHTON, 59 St. Sulpico Street, MONTREAL. 
THE TANDEM SMELTING SYNDICATE, LIMITED 

Queen Victoria St., London, E.C. 




The largest smelters of Anti-Friction 
Metals in Europe. 



Corrugated Iron. 



Lysaght's "Orb" and "Redcliffe" brands 
are the standard — good iron, uniform 
weights, best workmanship, no risk to 
the buyer. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO., Managers Canadian Branch, 
MONTREAL. 



JOHN LYSAGHT, limited. 




tW* 



tz& 



tr^ 



( Y+*- 



/^Y§bob POINTS. 

Mk Safford Radiator 

has a score of them, but there is one which success has accented — 
it's simplicity. Like all other great inventions, the "SAFFORD" 
is ingeniously simple. It is connected at the joints by patent 
screw nipples. That's what made the "SAFFORD" suc- 
cessful — no bolts, .no packing — just a plain screwed 
connection. This means that the "SAFFORD" is posi- 
tively non-leakable — positively durable. Of all Radiators 
the "SAFFORD" alone possesses this simple device. 

The "SAFFORD" is made in many designs and 
heights, and is always graceful in its lines and bulk. It 
is made to fit in corners, to circle pillars, and for bay 
windows. 

We will be pleased to give you any information you desire. Remember, we are the 
Largest Radiator Manufacturers under the British Flag. 

THE DOMINION RADIATOR COMPANY, Limited, TORONTO. 



Lawn 
Mowers 



■^r+ y^ y§ 'W0 lF& "%?* "^Q> J %T>" T^& ^T # lF& ~V9 "%<#• yg "^u> "^T # %!# l^w T^W y< Tr ^ "%T* 



... AND ... 




Garden Q 
Hose 



Special Mowers 

H FOR 

Golf Grounds and 
Tennis Courts. 



RICE LEWIS & SON 



LIMITED 



WRITE FOR PRICES. "ORON "O- 



Galvanized Sheets 

"Gordon Crown " Brand 



PATENT LEVELLED. 



Enquiries solicited for stock and import shipment. 






SAMUEL, SONS & BENJAMIN, - - LONDON AND LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND 

M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin & Co. 

General Importers and Exporters and Metal Merchants 

27 Wellington Street West, - - TORONTO, ONT. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND META 







James Cartland &. Son 

Manufacturers of every desciiption of Limited 

CABINET, BUILDERS', FURNISHING AND NAVAL BRASSFOUNDRY 
BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND. 




Belting 



THE 



London Showrooms: 57 Holborn Viaduct, E.C. 



Canadian RubberC? 



MONTREAL -'.•> TORONTO 






W/NNIPEG 



Other Tools are very 
good Tools, but 



"YANKEE TOOLS" 



ARE 
BETTER 



mmmmmmam 



"YANKEE" 

RATCHET SCHEW DRIVER 
N9IS 





Our "YANKEE" Tool Book 
tells all about them. Mailed 
free on application 



No. IS. "Yankee Ratchet Screw Driver, with Finger Turn on Blade. 




No. 30. " Yankee " Spiral-Ratchet screw Driver, Right and Left Hand. 




No. 41. "Yankee" Automatic Drill,'' Eight Drill Points in Handle. 




No. 50. "Yankee" Reciprocating Drill, for Iron, Steel. Brass, Wood, etc. 



Manufacturers also of 

LIGHTNING, 

GEM and 

BLIZZARD 
Ice Cream Freezers. 

Toy Freezers, 

Ice Shaves and 

Ice Chlppers. 

Fluting Machines, 

Hand Fluters. 



Sold by Leading Jobbers 
in Canada. 




No. 60. 

Pocket Magazine 

Screw Driver. 



NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 

Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



FOR WARM AIR HEATING. 



Our many lines of coal and wood furnaces offer a range of sizes and styles 
that afford complete satisfaction — everywhere. 



OUR LATEST CONSTRUCTION" 



ii 



M 



The Oxford 400 Series 

are unequalled in excellence — combining enormous power with gratifying economy. 
Their improved points of construction will interest every practical dealer or buyer. 

They are made with Steel Plate Radiators, and supplied either portable, as shown, 
or stationary for brick setting. 

Our Little Ox and Oxford Furnaces fOP WOOd are already in favorable use all over the country, their incomparable 
popularity having been gained by superior merit. 

Consult our catalogue for full information about these splendid lines — to handle them will insure the most satisfying 
trade possible. 




Oxford 400 Series, Portable. 



THE GURNEY FOUNDRY CO., Limited 

TORONTO. WINNIPEG. VANCOUVER. 

THE GURNEY-MASSEY CO, LIMITED, MONTREAL. 



DOMINION WIRE MANUFACTURING CO. 



MONTREAL 




Limited. 



| TORONTO 



Manufacturers of , 

Wire Nails 

Wood Screws 

Bright Wire Goods 

Baling Wire 

Broom and Mattress Wire 

Galvanized Wire 
Staples 

Crescent Coat and Hat Hooks 

Jack Chain Wire Door Pulls 

Cotter Pins Barb Wire 

WRITE FOR PRICES AND DISCOUNTS. 



7he?ewbaldwiiT 

DRY AIR CLEANABLE 

REFRIGERATOR. 

135 Modern Varieties. Ash, Oak and Soft-wood Finishes 

METAL, PORCELAIN, SPRUCE LININGS. 



BALDWIN 

Positive Circulation — 
Sanitary — Odorless. 
Latest Cleanable Fea- 
tures — The Strongest 
and Best System of 
Patent Removable 
Metal Air-Flues. 
Air-Tight Lever Looks 
Bali-Bearing Casters. 
Swing Base — in and 

out. 
Rubber around Doors 
and Lids, making 
them doubly air-tight. 
Handsome Designs. 
Moderate Prices. 



Si 




w 



n 



Built in the newest, largest and best equipped refrigerator plant in the Ea I 
run all the year round on refrigerators exclusively ; stock goods ; special 
refrigerators and coolers in sections. 

Handsome Trade Catalogue Ready. 

Baldwin Refrigerator Co., 

BURLINGTON, VERMONT. 



i 






CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



Henry Disston & Sons 



(INCORPORATED) 



PHILADELPHIA, PA., U.S.A. 

CRQSMPXM 

sjjfc^ "^Gf— Qr>~0 i^i^CC C^*4 innT^.S 

lllBlliffe n m .... *1 ^ * ° l 



Henry Disston & Sons' Tree Saw— SPECIAL for Canadian Lumber Trade. 

Easy and Rapid Cutters. 




..... y^, ...? 




iii'S pi ' ' ■ '5^MM:i 

Henry Disston & Sons' St. Lawrence— SPECIAL for Canadian Lumber Trade 

Perfectly Ground by Experts. 




e«l a rrant«D\r/Supt r i « 

EXTRA THIN BACK 




Henry Disston & Sons' Champion—Tooth No. I. 

Four Gauges Thinner on Back 
than on Tooth Edge. 



Lewis Bros. & Co., 



Henry Disston & Sons, 



Wholesale Hardware 

^^5 MONTREAL 



(INCORPORATED) 

PHILADELPHIA, PA., U.S.A. 

Mall Orders shipped same day as recelevd, and billed at Lowest Prices. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



HENRY ROGERS, 
SONS & CO., 

SHEFFIELD, ENGL AN I) 

Manufacturers of the celebrated 




HRS*C 

UNION JACK 

CUTLERY 

We make a specialty of 

PLATED WARE, 
FRUIT KNIVES, ETC. 

Our Canadian Representative carries a full line 
of samples. 

Canadian Office : 

6 St. Sacrament St., MONTREAL 

F. A. YORK, Manager. 




CET THE ORIGINAL. 

We lead, others imitate. 

E. T. WRIGHT <8 CO. 



Manufacturers. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 



KNOX HENRY 

Heavy Hardware and Metal Broker 
Room 32, Canada Life Bldg., MONTREAL. 




Samples sent free on application, 

HORSE NAILS-" C" Brand Horse- Nails 
Canada Horse Nail Co. 

" BRASSITE " GOODS — Gunn Castor Co. 
Limited, Birmingham, Eng. 



Will Hold Up a Shelf! 

That's what a shelf bracket is for. 
For this purpose there can be 

NOTHING BETTER 

NOTHINC CHEAPER 

than the .... 

BRADLEY STEEL SHELF BRACKET 

It is well Japanned, Strong and Light. 

'J he Faving in freight is a good profit, aside 
from the lower price at which the goods are sold. 
8®* Order director through your jobber. 
ATLAS MFG. CO., New Haven, Conn.. U.S. A 




(CANADIAN ADVERTISING is best done by THE 
^ E. DESBARATS ADVERTISING AGENCY 

Montreal. 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John Street, Montreal 

Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishing to be represented in Canada. 



r 



-ARE 



J STEVENS 

j 



ALL 
TOOLS 



STANDARD FOR QUALITY. 

Your stock is not complete without a full line of our Rifles, Shotguns, Pistols, Tools 

and Victor Bioycles. 

Handled by the Leading Jobbers. 

J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co., p ° 2l ? ox Chicopee Falls, Mass., U.S.A. 




This eight-foot Brake bends 23-gaage iron 
and lighter, straight and true. 

Price, $60 

Very bandy header attachment, $15 extra 

if required. 

Send for circulars and testimonials to 

The Double Truss Cornice 
Brake Co, 555£Eg!i°2i 



The Latest and Best. 

H. & R. Automatic Ejecting 
Single Gun. 



Model 
1900. 



Steel and Twist Barrels 
in 30 and 32-inch. 

12 Gauge. 




Harrington & Richardson Arms Co. 

Worcester, Mass., U.S.A. 

Descriptive Catalogue on request. 



We want progressive, hustling dealers to make 
...the... 

"London" Fence Machine 




a specialty, 
looking for. 



It is just what the farmers are 



Woodstock, Ont., July 27th, 1901. 



The London Fence Machine Co. 

Gentlemen, — We beg to report that the " London " Fence Machine seems to 
be exactly what the farmers have been looking for, for some considerable time. It 
appears to do most excellent work and bas given our customers universal satisfac- 
tion. We are very much of the opinion that the sales of your machine* *,ust 
necessarily grow to large proportions. Yours very truly, 

J. H. BUCHANAN & CO. 

High-Grade High Carbon Coiled Spring Wire. "London" Pulley 
Stretchers, Reels, Steel Gates, Soft Galvanized Wire, Barb Wire and 
Plain Twist. Special prices on cars of wire f.o.b. London or Cleveland. 



London Fence Machine Co., London, Can. 



CANADIAN HARDWARE AND METAL 



ESTABLISHED I860. 



INCORPORATED 1895. 



%.%.%>%. 




^ 3 ^ ^ 



COAL HODS 



and . . . 

All Other Pall Lines. 



Stove Boards, 
pipe Shovels, 

Elbouus, ete. 

We will be pleased to quote. 



THE THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO., Limited, MONTREAL, QUE. 



The 
Mower 

THAT WILL KILL 
ALL THE WEEDS 
IN YOUR LAWNS 

If you keep the 
weeds cut so they cio 
not go to seed, and 
cut your grass with- 
out breaking the small feeders of roots, the grass 
will become thick and weeds will disappear. The 
Clipper will do it. 




BURMAN & SONS' clippers 



Established 1871. 



for Horsemen 

BIRMINGHAM, ENG. — ■•"»•«■ 




NO. 297. 



NO 



3— POWER CLIPPER, with "Wrist Joint. 

("The Czar of Russia. 
As sup